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Doug D. Eigsti

Increasing my ops tempo by allowing storytellers to whisper in my ear(buds).

Colorado Springs, Colorado United States | Member Since 2013

157
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 169 reviews
  • 179 ratings
  • 648 titles in library
  • 22 purchased in 2015
FOLLOWING
55
FOLLOWERS
9

  • The Stress of Her Regard

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Tim Powers
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (113)
    Performance
    (96)
    Story
    (98)

    When Michael Crawford discovers his bride brutally murdered in their wedding bed, he is forced to flee not only to prove his innocence but to avoid the deadly embrace of a vampire who has claimed him as her true bridegroom. Joining forces with Byron, Keats, and Shelley in a desperate journey that crisscrosses Europe, Crawford desperately seeks his freedom from this vengeful lover who haunts his dreams and will not rest until she destroys all that he cherishes.

    Dave says: "Terrifying - A New Benchmark for Vampires Stories"
    "Vampire Lamia as Poetic Muse"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Tim Powers offers up an alternative mythology that is more intriguing than the inanity of the pop-culture version of Greeks and Romans that infest the social dialog. Tim Powers builds a complex world where the Biblical Nephilim are at once a source of immortality and the lamia and succubae of vampire lore. Counter that with other forces whose foresight cancels human volition and you have this odd fantasy novel. My mind was fascinated by the complicated inter-workings of the fantastical rules that govern Powers’ world; so much so, that the story lost any aspect of horror it might otherwise have had for me. It is a vampire story that is so detached from the real world that it retains nothing scary. But that is not a bad thing unless you are looking to be frightened. I was looking for Tim Powers to show off his capacity for strangeness and intricate plotting; that I did find. Powers effectively weaves his love for poetry throughout this novel. As is the case with most of his work, each section is introduced with quotes that are quite appropriate with the times and the themes of the book. Incidentally, if you are of a mind to trace the quotations, realize that the poet William Ashbless is a fabrication of Tim Powers and his friend Jim Blaylock that both draw upon to provide period citations whenever required in their books.

    Simon Vance provides a journeyman effort. His delivery is soothing and so very British. Sometimes I found that I was momentarily confused at some of his gender voicings. As soon as I thought I was able to recognize his typical intonation for one of the female characters one would turn out to be a male. His talent is that of having a great accent and excellent enunciation. He is not always consistent with giving each characters his own voice, or being consistent with a voice at every appearance.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • East of Eden

    • UNABRIDGED (25 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By John Steinbeck
    • Narrated By Richard Poe
    Overall
    (1542)
    Performance
    (1319)
    Story
    (1336)

    This sprawling and often brutal novel, set in the rich farmlands of California's Salinas Valley, follows the intertwined destinies of two families - the Trasks and the Hamiltons - whose generations helplessly reenact the fall of Adam and Eve and the poisonous rivalry of Cain and Abel.

    karen says: "American classic, not to be missed."
    "American Horror Story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is Steinbeck’s masterpiece. Here is exposed the evil that is in men’s hearts. John Steinbeck depicts some people as monsters. Not the creepy paranormal monsters of Stephen King but a much more horrifying type of monster; the kind that lives in the head of everyone. The people in this book are complex and realistic, all the more so because their proclivities toward evil are uncomfortably familiar to anyone of Adam’s race. I recommend this as a lofty example of American novel writing, and an engrossing excursion into the true nature of man. Richard Poe narrates in a voice that just seems perfectly apt for that of a young Steinbeck. This is everything I look for in an audiobook: captivating entertainment with a hook that forces your mind to ponder.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Lonesome Dove

    • UNABRIDGED (36 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Larry McMurtry
    • Narrated By Lee Horsley
    Overall
    (3579)
    Performance
    (2005)
    Story
    (2034)

    Larry McMurtry's American epic, set in the late 19th century, tells the story of a cattle drive from Texas to Montana, a drive that represents not only a daring foolhardy adventure, but a part of the American Dream for everyone involved.

    A. Wright says: "Inspired reading of a great book"
    "Death on the Plains"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Listening to this was like reliving the TV miniseries from years ago. Every chapter brought to mind a scene from the video production and I realized that the movie was very faithful to the book. There are very strong influences of the television production evident in this audiobook. Lee Horsley is wonderful as the narrator, and his voicing of the character Gus is a perfect impression of Tommy Lee Jones. There is so much beauty of characterization in this book that one must wonder what cruel intention was in McMurtry’s mind when he penned such fixation on death that pervades every story arc in this novel.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Revenge of Geography: What the Map Tells Us About Coming Conflicts and the Battle Against Fate

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Robert D. Kaplan
    • Narrated By Michael Prichard
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (188)
    Performance
    (158)
    Story
    (158)

    In The Revenge of Geography, Robert D. Kaplan builds on the insights, discoveries, and theories of great geographers and geopolitical thinkers of the near and distant past to look back at critical pivots in history and then to look forward at the evolving global scene. Kaplan traces the history of the world's hot spots by examining their climates, topographies, and proximities to other embattled lands.

    C. Telfair says: "Why Don't They Teach This Stuff?"
    "Inside the Geo-Political Think-Tank"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I recently concluded listening to several books on various elements of world history and this was the best. At first I thought this was too dry for my taste and the narration by Michael Prichard brought to mind the voice-overs of old Cinema news-reels. But after paying attention for several hours I began to track with the writer and discovered that Kaplan is in touch with current academic thought and is able to distill information from a wide variety of sources and relate it in a fashion that is understandable for the layman. Despite the title, this is not an unmitigated defense of geographical determinism. This books does, however, put forth many examples from history of people groups who—for a time—defy the restrictions of topography, in ambitious exploits of martial glory, only to succumb to the inevitable forces of the lands in which they live. For me, this book was a glimpse into the realm of the political experts that advise the movers and shakers of the world. It is useful for those trying to make sense of the ebb and flow of ancient civilizations—and attempt to predict what may transpire in our own time.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Swerve: How the World Became Modern

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Stephen Greenblatt
    • Narrated By Edoardo Ballerini
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1164)
    Performance
    (1012)
    Story
    (1006)

    Nearly six hundred years ago, a short, genial, cannily alert man in his late 30s took a very old manuscript off a library shelf, saw with excitement what he had discovered, and ordered that it be copied. That book was the last surviving manuscript of an ancient Roman philosophical epic by Lucretius—a beautiful poem containing the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of very small particles.

    Ethan M. says: "Very compelling history, a less compelling thesis"
    "Making the World Safe for Epicurean Atomism"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book is less a history lesson than it is a worshipful panegyric extolling the virtues of materialistic atheism. I found it to be well written and wonderfully narrated by Edoardo Ballerini. What I did not find it to be was correct. Greenblatt’s premise is that the lost poem of Lucretius, “On the Nature of Things” was instrumental in shaping the modern way of thinking. And what was this great rediscovered revelation so nearly lost to history? “The denial of divine providence and the denial of the afterlife were the twin pillars of Lucretuis’ whole poem” (8:29). I hardly think that atheism was in danger of being forgotten. Greenblatt succumbs to the common error of many who spend their lives in the hollowed halls of higher learning: he fails to consider that the normal state of man is a life lived in rebellion against God. For Greenblatt the recovery of this lost poem of Lucretius was not just a boon to literature but to epistemology as well; for through it we remain connected to our classical atomistic roots. He attributes Lucretius the virtue of restoring our atomistic understanding of the ontological nature of the universe. This was summed up in the words of the modern popularizer of atheistic thought, Carl Sagan, who famously, and nearly reverentially, put mankind in his place with the words, “We are star stuff.” No humanistic, materialistic atheism was never in danger of extinction. That said, this book is an entertaining excursion exploring humanistic thought and Greenblatt makes his case as well as he can considering his presuppositional basis of Godlessness.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly, and the Making of the Modern Middle East

    • UNABRIDGED (23 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Scott Anderson
    • Narrated By Malcolm Hillgartner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (535)
    Performance
    (461)
    Story
    (462)

    Based on four years of intensive primary document research, Lawrence in Arabiadefinitively overturns received wisdom on how the modern Middle East was formed. Sweeping in its action, keen in its portraiture, acid in its condemnation of the destruction wrought by European colonial plots, this is a book that brilliantly captures the way in which the folly of the past creates the anguish of the present.

    carolyn says: "A Middle East Built on Lies"
    "Dissembling the Myth of Lawrence of Arabia"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Any attempt to understand the modern world must explain the shape of the Middle East. This is a serious attempt to dismantle the Middle East turmoil from the perspective of World War One and the enigmatic figure of T. E. Lawrence. After listening, I can say that I think I grasp the shape of the political forces of the Middle East a lot better but that I fail to know the strangely paradoxical figure of Lawrence. Far from the romantic Peter O’Toole version of Lawrence of Arabia, Scott Anderson paints a portrait of the man that is more realistic and contradictory.
    Malcolm Hillgartner submits a journeyman’s effort here. Nothing spectacular, but clear and unobtrusive.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Origins of Political Order: From Prehuman Times to the French Revolution

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Francis Fukuyama
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (553)
    Performance
    (455)
    Story
    (455)

    Virtually all human societies were once organized tribally, yet over time most developed new political institutions which included a central state that could keep the peace and uniform laws that applied to all citizens. Some went on to create governments that were accountable to their constituents. We take these institutions for granted, but they are absent or are unable to perform in many of today’s developing countries—with often disastrous consequences for the rest of the world.

    blah says: "Best Summary of Political History I've Read"
    "Bureaucrat’s Perspective on World History"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Consider the sweep of world history from the perspective of governmental structure. This book is useful to gain an understanding of our modern world by looking at the development of the various strategies employed by the ancients. I now have a better understanding of how China can have a tradition of central government going back thousands of years and still not have any sense of ethics in their leadership. I now know how Russia seems to have difficulty implementing Western-style democracy when all they have ever known is authoritarianism. Of course, for it to fully sink in I will have to listen to it a second time; but first I may tackle volume two. This book is structured much like a series of scholarly lectures. Narrated by the always excellent Jonathan Davis.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed

    • ABRIDGED (9 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Jared Diamond
    • Narrated By Christopher Murney
    Overall
    (1177)
    Performance
    (314)
    Story
    (319)

    In his million-copy best seller Guns, Germs, and Steel, Jared Diamond examined how and why Western civilizations developed the technologies and immunities that allowed them to dominate much of the world. Now in this brilliant companion volume, Diamond probes the other side of the equation: what caused some of the great civilizations of the past to collapse into ruin, and what can we learn from their fates?

    Rebecca says: "an fascinating book, but better on paper"
    "Environmental Damage Will Get Us All in the End"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book has been in my library for years, and since I was on a history kick I decided to tackle it now. The first thing that struck me was the disparity in narrative impact between Diamond’s Guns, Germs and Steel and this book. Collapse has none of the human interest of the earlier work. He does give several examples of his theory of the reasons for cultural collapse—all of which are some variation of environmental damage. This reads (listens) like a piece of propaganda for the Climate Change believers.
    At first I was disappointed that I had mistakenly obtained the abridged version, but after the first hour I began to wish for the end to come even sooner. I can recommend Guns, Germs and Steel as a thought provoking book; important for the cultural literacy of any conversationalist. Reading this book will not make you the life of any party. Hearing the doom and gloom of such cautionary tales from those looking to government to solve all of society’s ills is tedious and not at all entertaining.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Charlemagne

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Richard Winston
    • Narrated By Charlton Griffin
    Overall
    (790)
    Performance
    (371)
    Story
    (375)

    Charlemagne was easily one of the most fascinating figures in Western civilization, as well as the most heroic and romantic. The 47 years of his reign marked some of the most significant and far reaching events of the Middle Ages. Undoubtedly, it was his enlightened vision for Europe that resulted in the Carolingian Renaissance, a period of cultural flowering that never really ceased to develop, and which led in a straight line directly to that period of astonishing achievement we now call the High Gothic.

    Frank says: "A wonderful biography"
    "Prototype of Holy Roman Emperors to Come"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book filled in some gaps in my understanding of the history of Western Civilization but failed to thrill me as some other periods of history were able to do.

    Charlton Griffin is a fine choice for narrator here. The production values employed here are quite high. I particularly enjoyed the treatment of quotations in this audiobook: When quoting, Griffin’s voice is given some reverb, thus setting the quotation material apart from the explanatory text.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Jack Weatherford
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis, Jack Weatherford
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4512)
    Performance
    (3006)
    Story
    (3033)

    The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in 25 years than the Romans did in 400. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization.

    Peter says: "Brilliant, insightful, intriguing."
    "…..The Civilized Savage….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It is amazing what Genghis Khan was able to accomplish from the steppes of Asia. The empire he established would eventually reign over all of what are now Chinese lands and extended to the realms of Europe. Most interesting was the high level of organization the great Khan instilled in his government without a dominant centralized capitol city. I found this to be an interesting historical account.

    Jonathan Davis is one of my favorite narrators. I found his effort here to be a bit slow-paced. Increasing the playback speed to 1.5X retained all the qualities needed to understand his voice and helped me retain my interest.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Never Give In!: The Best of Winston Churchill's Speeches

    • ORIGINAL (17 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Winston Churchill, Winston S. Churchill (compilation)
    • Narrated By Winston Churchill
    Overall
    (18)
    Performance
    (15)
    Story
    (16)

    Winston Churchill was the most eloquent and expressive statesman of his time. It was as an orator that Churchill became most completely alive, and it was through his oratory that his words made their greatest and most enduring impact. While the definitive collection of Churchill's speeches fills eight volumes, here for the first time, his grandson, Winston S. Churchill, has put together a personal selection of his favorite speeches in a single, indispensable volume.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "…..Churchill Was the Anti-Nahzee….."
    "…..Churchill Was the Anti-Nahzee….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Winston Churchill is a towering figure in the history of the twentieth century, and a master of the English language. I recommend that you listen to the three volume, 132 hour-long, biography by William Manchester (vol. 3 with Paul Reid)— titled collectively, The Last Lion—in order to get a picture of the man Churchill before delving into his voice in these speeches.

    Churchill has been called a great orator, and that is certainly true, but this not because he possessed a Stentorian voice, or even great talent of diction. On the contrary, his voice is almost comically wispy and his annunciation is often muddled. He had a slight speech impediment that brings to mind Elmer Fudd when you hear him speak. The monumental force of his will, his penetrating mind, and his razor sharp wit combined to force him into the public forum. He knew that he had to become a great public speaker and set out to achieve that goal with his typical purpose and drive. Reading his biography we learn that he had to overcome his fear of public speaking with designed determination. He spoke from notes, and not just from a brief hand-written outline: He had his speeches typed out in what his staff called “Psalm form.” By this they meant that each line was printed on a separate line, like a poem. He made notes on inserting effective pauses, on where to raise his voice, and where to pound the podium. Just like he overcame his weak body to become a star on the Polo field, overcame a learning disability to become a scholar, in like fashion he overcame his natural limitations, in diction and forcefulness of voice, to become the great public speaker that he knew he needed to become in order to motivate men to undertake the terrible task of fighting the forces of evil in this modern world.

    I thought I had a good grasp of the period of history and Chuchill’s place within it from reading his biography and his Memoirs. But listening to him speak lifted this history off of the page and made it real. He made it a point of mocking Hitler by consistently calling him “the Corporal” and purposefully mispronouncing “Nazi” as Nahzee. I have read of these disparaging tactics employed by Churchill but hearing them has forever cemented it in my mind. It is remarkable how spectacular it must have been to witness these events as they unfolded. Hearing Winston Churchill recount the progress of the war gave me a much better understanding of the mood and the times of the Second World War.

    Technical Notes:
    This production is billed at a 17:16 package. At about the 10 hour mark I noticed that the speeches were being repeated. For example: At time marker 2:25 there is a speech called “Broadcast from London to the United States,” which begins, “Alexander the Great remarked that the people of Asia were slaves because they had not learned to pronounce the word ‘no.’” This same speech is repeated at the 10:04 mark. From the ten hour point onward many, if not all, the speeches are duplicated. I skipped from chapter to chapter and noticed that up to the ten hour mark the speeches were in chronological order; taking the reader from the years leading up to WWII to the time of the surrender of Germany. After the ten-hour mark this production returns to the year 1939 and the speeches are duplicated.

    These are vintage recordings of speeches and readings from Churchill himself and the clarity of the recording is expectedly not up to modern standards. The words of Winston Churchill set their own high standard; one that no orator utilizing all the advanced technology nowadays can hope to equal.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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