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Doug D. Eigsti

Increasing my ops tempo by allowing storytellers to whisper in my ear(buds).

Colorado Springs, Colorado United States | Member Since 2013

141
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 159 reviews
  • 169 ratings
  • 627 titles in library
  • 10 purchased in 2015
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FOLLOWERS
9

  • The Prefect

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By Alastair Reynolds
    • Narrated By John Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1320)
    Performance
    (1062)
    Story
    (1060)

    Tom Dreyfus is a Prefect, a law enforcement officer with the Panoply. His beat is the multifaceted utopian society of the Glitter Band, that vast swirl of space habitats orbiting the planet Yellowstone, the teeming hub of a human interstellar empire spanning many worlds. His current case: investigating a murderous attack against one of the habitats that left 900 people dead, a crime that appalls even a hardened cop like Dreyfus.

    Michael G. Kurilla says: "Best yet of the Revelation Space series"
    "A Few Good Things"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    What is going on here? I don’t know if there is something wrong with me or that Alastair Reynolds is just a very inconsistent writer. I have truly enjoyed some parts of every one of his books, but, except for CHASM CITY, none has kept up the magic all the way through. His other works all seem to get bogged down with convoluted far-future concepts that are so far removed from actual human experience so as to be incomprehensible. You can listen to them just for those gems but there is a lot mush to slog through to get to those precious stones. I began listening to Alastair Reynolds based on the recommendation of several fellow listeners who had touted him as the modern-day master of Space Opera Science Fiction. They recommended the novel CHASM CITY as the best introduction to his Revelation Space series. And they were right. CHASM CITY is fantastic. It is the most accessible of all the novels in the series. It is the best written, has the best characters and the most fantastic “sense of wonder” technology of them all. I have now listened to, REVELATION SPACE, REDEMPTION ARK, ABSOLUTION GAP, and now THE PREFECT.. This novel THE PREFECT does have some nice blending of detective fiction with SF but is misses on so many levels. One of the prime characteristics of the Detective Fiction genre are the gritty hard-edged characters. Listening to this book actually affected my mood. My expectations were so high going in that I really needed this one to be great. After the wonderful introduction to Alastair Reynolds that I had with CHASM CITY; I hung in there through the three central novels of the series, and THE PREFECT, thinking that surely there would be a big, big payoff after so much SF world building background. I mean I hung in there for over 100 hours of John Lee whispering in my ear about indoctrinal viruses, Inhibitor genocide machines, processing Cathedrals, inertial inhibitors, Alternate Universes, longevity treatments, baseline humans, Conjoiner Ultras, Time Travel, Cryo-arithmetic engines, and talking pigs, and I wanted some reward. I got bupkis. I believe I can safely say that the best way to enjoy the Revelation Space series is to start by listening to CHASM CITY and then…stop.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Raven

    • UNABRIDGED (8 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe
    • Narrated By Anthony Donovan
    Overall
    (7)
    Performance
    (6)
    Story
    (6)

    This is a story from the Chilling Ghost Stories collection. The Raven, by Edgar Allan Poe, tells of a talking raven's mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man's slow fall into madness. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "…..Hannibal Lector Quoth ‘Nevermore’….."
    "…..Hannibal Lector Quoth ‘Nevermore’….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The first thing that struck me is that the voice of the narrator Anthony Donovan sounds to my ear to be identical to that of Sir Anthony Hopkins. So, while listening, I automatically imagined Hannibal Lector reading aloud from a small tattered volume of The Collected Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe while in his cell, nibbling on some fava beans. This adds to the unease this poem naturally evokes. This is a fine version of this most wonderful poem.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Raven and Selected Short Stories

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe
    • Narrated By Stefan Rudnicki, Bronson Pinchot
    Overall
    (23)
    Performance
    (19)
    Story
    (19)

    The title work in this collection of ten short stories and poems is widely regarded as the most famous of Edgar Allan Poe’s writings. This unsettling tale in verse tells of a man’s slow descent into madness as he mourns the loss of his lover. The mysterious visit of a talking raven that utters only one word sparks the man’s steady decline.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Sedate Rendition of Growing Madness"
    "Sedate Rendition of Growing Madness"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Having just completed my listening excursion into Poe with Christopher Aruffo’s masterful thirteen volume Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection, I longed to hear another interpretation. And, being a fan of the narration of Bronson Pinchot, I was anxious to discover his interpretation of the fantastic tales of Mr. Poe. What I discovered is a competent, if uninspired rendition of these tales of terror and insanity. I realize that the slow descent into insanity, typical of Poe’s tales, is appropriately related in a calm and sane voice, at first, then becoming increasingly anxious as the character’s underlying lunacy is progressively revealed. Pinchot and Rudniki do this expertly. What I was looking for, however, was an over-the-top melodramatic performance; that I did not find. True, there are brief moments of hysteria in the narration such as Pinchot screaming in Rodderick Usher’s voice, “Madman, I tell you that she now stands without the door!” This brief example dramatic acting-out was what I hoping for. Alas, it is only extant in a few places in this collection. This is a fine production of these classic Poe stories. The sound quality is clean and resonant. Both of the narrators are a pleasure to listen to. So, if you want a faithful respectable reading of Edgar Allan Poe, you will not be disappointed. My search for a crazed maniacal unhinged frenetic portrayal of derangement continues. I think Poe deserves at least one such performance, don’t you?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection 11-13: The Tell-Tale Heart and Other Stories

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Includes: "The Tell-Tale Heart": The unceasing pulse of a mysterious heart drives a man to both madness and murder. "Man of the Crowd": Through the dark streets of London, a man is compelled into relentless pursuit of a mysterious figure. "Hop-Frog": A misshapen jester enlivens the king's masquerade ball in a most unexpected manner. "Metzengerstein": The savage Baron Metzengerstein is obsessed with a monstrous and unaccountable horse. And six more classic tales of horror!

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection 10: Deus ex Machina

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Christopher Aruffo, Edgar Allan Poe
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    From the spiritual to the mechanical, Deus Et Machina gathers many never-recorded stories and essays by Edgar Allan Poe. Included: The Facts In The Case Of M. Valdemar: By the power of a mesmeric spell, an invalid's soul is trapped at the exact moment of death. Von Kempelen and His Discovery: The legendary formula-- pursued by alchemists throughout the ages-- will finally be secret no more.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook: Collection 9: The Pioneers

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe, Christopher Aruffo
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    Travel with Poe across the vast Atlantic, to the wild uncharted regions of the Americas, and even to the moon!

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection 6-8: The Cask of Amontillado and Other Stories

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe, Christopher Aruffo
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    This audiobook collection contains a selection of eight short stories by Edgar Allan Poe, one of the most influential authors in American literature.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection 5: Eureka

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe, Christopher Aruffo
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Poe's masterpiece of cosmology unites the laws of Nature with the infinite Universe - to its Creation, its Material and Spiritual Essence, and its ultimate Destiny. At once thoughtful, heretical, and beautiful, the author himself proclaims Eureka as his life's greatest achievement.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Poe on Poetry: Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection, Volume 4

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe, Christopher Aruffo
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    The author reveals his craft in the structure of story, the creation of Beauty, the role of the critic, and the mechanics of verse - including a complete, step-by-step explanation of how he wrote his most famous poem, The Raven.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Edgar Allan Poe Audiobook Collection 1-3: The Black Cat and Other Stories

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Edgar Allan Poe, Christopher Aruffo
    • Narrated By Christopher Aruffo
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    A collection of short stories by Edgar Allen Poe. Includes The Black Cat, The Pit and the Pendulum, William Wilson, The Masque of the Red Death, The Fall of the House of Usher, and The Imp of the Perverse.

    Doug D. Eigsti says: "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    "Christopher Aruffo Speaks With Poe’s Voice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am reviewing this entire series narrated by Christopher Aruffo: Volumes 1 through 13

    Some of the volumes have been grouped together. It is therefore possible to acquire all 13 volumes contained in just 7 different audiobook titles.

    Since Edgar Allan Poe is such a familiar figure of American literature I will focus my attentions on the quality of this particular audiobook production. The sound is clean and pure. The occasional sound effects are appropriate and enhance the enjoyment of the stories. The pronunciation leans toward the British occasionally, as is justified by the characters, but Christopher Aruffo’s voice is resoundingly American.

    Christopher Aruffo has a fine and versatile voice. His rendering of these Poe stories is wonderful and urgently demands your attention making it difficult for your mind to wander. Aruffo’s ability to voice different characters makes me wish that Poe had constructed his tales utilizing a larger cast of characters and with more dialog. I had always enjoyed the stories of Edgar Allan Poe but now that I can hear Christopher Aruffo narrate them I find that Poe makes more sense. It seems that it takes a faithful and entirely devoted rendering by a scholar such as Aruffo to get inside Poe’s head and then voice them for me in order for me to fully appreciate Poe. I do think that Aruffo deeply understands Poe at a level that only someone fully immersed in Poe’s oeuvre can hope to do. I even found that the many articles included in this collection were made enjoyable—even artistic—by Christopher Aruffo’s sublime delivery.

    The HIGHLIGHTS of this collection include the following:

    Poe’s Erueka (Collection 5) reveals that Poe was up to date with the latest scientific discoveries of his day. In it he expounds at length upon the nature of the universe and the primary forces that affect it. It is less dated than I would have supposed considering its nineteenth century origin. Poe calls this a prose poem and wished for it to be judged by the standards of poetry.

    In “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” (Collection 10) Aruffo gave me such a shock in delivering the voice of the mesmerized M. Valdemar that I had to go back and listen to it again to hear what was being said. Here Aruffo enhances the impact of Poe’s story even beyond that possible from the printed version.

    When reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” (Collection 11) it is clear that Christopher Aruffo is in danger of succumbing to the insanity of Poe’s main character. This is perfectly done.

    Any fan of The Raven will find their understanding and appreciation of the classic poem by listening The Philosophy of Composition in Collection 4. This very technical essay will help you understand that this masterpiece was approached in a very careful and mathematical fashion. The result achieved was exactly the one designed. The famous poem is not included in this collection but extensive excerpts, given for example, make it seem as if Aruffo has read the poem.

    Christopher Aruffo’s voicing of the title character in “Hop Frog” (Collection 12) is wonderful. I remember reading this years ago and not really getting the point. Now that Aruffo has read it to me, I can say that it is one of Poe’s most entertaining stories.

    “The Cask of Amontillado” (Collection 7) demonstrates Poe’s great sense of timing. Also here Aruffo is spot on in his rendering of the tricky pacing. Here also is a fine chance for his to display his knack for character voices, since much of the story is told through a dialog between the main characters.

    “The Oblong Box” (Collection 6)somehow manages to be simultaneously surprising and inevitable. And hearing Aruffo adds some heightened drama.

    Bottom line: I recommend that anyone desiring to cultivate their appreciation for the works of Edgar Allan Poe obtain this quality edition by Christopher Aruffo

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Vampire$

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By John Steakley
    • Narrated By Tom Weiner
    Overall
    (137)
    Performance
    (78)
    Story
    (79)

    Suppose there really were vampires. Dark, stalking, destroying. They’d have to be killed, wouldn’t they? Of course they would. But what kind of fools would try to make a living at it? In best-selling author John Steakley's vampire classic, one tightly knit band of brothers devotes itself to hunting down the monsters that infest the modern world—for a price.

    Andrew Pollack says: "Great to see Steakley back - and in good form"
    ".....ARMOR Coda. Felix is Back!....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As a fan of Steakley’s military SF novel ARMOR—and realizing that Steakley only managed to complete this one final book before his untimely death—I was compelled to listen to VAMPIRE$. It is true that the main character from ARMOR, Felix, reprises his role as the reluctant warrior in this second book. But there is scant evidence to connect the Felix here with the Felix of the earlier book save for his struggle to overcome fear and his incredible aptitude for destruction in the face of impossible odds. One wonders if John Steakley would have continued in this vein; reprising Felix in this same role in a number of different genre stories, had his career not been cut short. Alas, we will never know. Fortunately Steakley did leave us with this fine coda to the sometimes profound and sometimes paradoxical Military yet Anti-War novel ARMOR. I like to think that Steakley is exploring the very nature of heroism through Felix the fearful juggernaut that is always expecting death but lives to fight another day.

    Along the way in VAMPIRE$ we get a rousing action novel with vampires that are but repulsive and yet irresistibly seductive. One of the things I have come to appreciate about Steakley’s work is his fondness for paradox.

    Tom Weiner, fittingly, is one of those paradoxes. He has a tender softness in his voice when portraying female characters; a boyish jocularity when voicing the jester Cat; and delivers Felix with the appropriate nervous confidence that his character demands. His flexibility in performing multiple character voices is contrasted by his intransigent, almost overbearing, through the narrative sections. He never becomes the voice in my head. His narration in between dialog scenes gives the book an intensity that I would have missed reading it own my own. I recommend him highly. And if you haven’t yet heard ARMOR go and get it. You can thank me later.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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