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Doug D. Eigsti

Increasing my ops tempo by allowing storytellers to whisper in my ear(buds).

Colorado Springs, Colorado United States | Member Since 2011

127
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 139 reviews
  • 149 ratings
  • 599 titles in library
  • 124 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
36
FOLLOWERS
7

  • Count Zero

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By William Gibson
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (668)
    Performance
    (444)
    Story
    (450)

    A corporate mercenary wakes in a reconstructed body, a beautiful woman by his side. Then Hosaka Corporation reactivates him, for a mission more dangerous than the one he's recovering from: to get a defecting chief of R&D-and the biochip he's perfected-out intact. But this proves to be of supreme interest to certain other parties-some of whom aren't remotely human.

    Michael says: "Where've you been all my life?"
    "Situation Normal"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This sequel to NEUROMANCER manages to keep the feel of its predecessor but lacks the panache I would have hoped for. I did find Bobby, the Count, to be more interesting than Case from the first book.

    Jonathan Davis delvers a steady, if a bit subdued, for him, performance; much like the effort Robertson Dean put forth in the first book. Perhaps this was a conscious decision to retain some conformity for the series. I would have liked to have heard a hyped-up version of the story. It could have used the help.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Red Seas Under Red Skies

    • UNABRIDGED (25 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Scott Lynch
    • Narrated By Michael Page
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2309)
    Performance
    (1844)
    Story
    (1845)

    After a brutal battle with the underworld that nearly destroyed him, Locke Lamora and his trusted sidekick, Jean, fled the island city of their birth and landed on the exotic shores of Tal Verrar to nurse their wounds. But even at this westernmost edge of civilization, they can't rest for long - and they are soon back doing what they do best: stealing from the undeserving rich and pocketing the proceeds for themselves.

    Anthony says: "This is how you write a series!"
    "…..Blackmailed to Fly the Jolly Roger....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This series came to life with this second book. Now that we know the characters of Locke and John their exploits take sail. Their love for pilferage gets them into some very dicey situations that are festooned with danger, (mis)adventure and comedy. This is a great big fun book that will keep you entertained from the first chapter to the last. Unexpectedly tightly plotted, the action takes Locke and John from one peril to another, first operating within their comfort zone—thieving and running confidence games—to being cast adrift in a nautical word of freebooters where their only assets are their wits. This novel has a strong plot that elevates is far above the first.

    Michael Page tailors his performance to the over-the-top nature of the action in the story. His voicing is expertly energetic and melodramatic as the story requires. As a result this fun book is made even more fun by listening to his dramatic portrayal. Sit back and let Michael Page tell you a rousing story.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Lies of Locke Lamora

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Scott Lynch
    • Narrated By Michael Page
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3618)
    Performance
    (2879)
    Story
    (2879)

    An orphan's life is harsh---and often short---in the island city of Camorr, built on the ruins of a mysterious alien race. But born with a quick wit and a gift for thieving, Locke Lamora has dodged both death and slavery, only to fall into the hands of an eyeless priest known as Chains---a man who is neither blind nor a priest. A con artist of extraordinary talent, Chains passes his skills on to his carefully selected "family" of orphans---a group known as the Gentlemen Bastards.

    Luke A. Reynolds says: "Stupendous, but be warned."
    "…..Meet Two Lovable Rogues ....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a very likable start to the series. Scott Lynch gives his main characters a detailed back-story so that we feel that we know and understand the life of crime that Locke and John are thrown into. A variety of misadventures ensues to let us know that crime does not pay, at least not forever. As is typical of caper stories humor is a steady companion to these exploits of the Gentlemen Bastards. This book is entertaining and the next is even more fun.

    Michael Page gives an enthusiastic performance, attaining emotional heights that lend to the already considerable fun.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Dark Defiles: A Land Fit for Heroes, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (24 hrs)
    • By Richard K. Morgan
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    Overall
    (55)
    Performance
    (52)
    Story
    (52)

    Ringil Eskiath, a reluctant hero viewed as a corrupt degenerate by the very people who demand his help, has traveled far in search of the Illwrack Changeling, a deathless human sorcerer-warrior raised by the bloodthirsty Aldrain, former rulers of the world. Separated from his companions - Egar the Dragonbane and Archeth - Ringil risks his soul to master a deadly magic that alone can challenge the might of the Changeling.

    Trip Williams says: "Waited A LONG Time For This one!"
    "…..NC-17 Sword and Sorcery….."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Richard Morgan’s third entry into the fantasy genre again downplays the explicit scenes that were so prominent in the first book. I am trying to be discrete here. It is evident that there has been a conscious decision to be a little less in-your-face on such gratuitous scenes at the end of this series. Here the events of the trilogy are allowed to unfold without too much of the rainbow desensitization techniques he employed so copiously in the first installment—and for this I am grateful. What we are left with is a quite mundane sword-and-sorcery novel. The three main characters are back again and live up to their nicknames in every sense. It is fun to see them in action. And nobody does action better than Morgan.

    At the end of the day I think that I failed to fully engage with this series because of the aforementioned salacious elements and so have not really much cared what happens to the characters. There is a dearth of redeeming social value here. As a result I just let the audio play out and tried to follow the plot, which at times was difficult because the action seems focused more on the grubby details of mercenary life than it does on the grander story arc with the fate of the world at stake. This is not, therefore, an epic fantasy by any means. The unfolding Duenda war feels like little more than a manufactured crisis to allow the characters to misbehave. Alfred Hitchcock would call this the MacGuffin—the thing the characters in the story care about who facilitate the action that the audience cares about. The characters want to save the world and we in the audience want to witness them hacking and slashing their way to victory. So, while this series may have broken ground in introducing the genre to a sympathetic portrayal of an openly gay main character, it is pretty standard Sword and Sorcery fare otherwise. Knowing the dizzying heights that Richard Morgan is capable of hitting in his Science Fiction novels, this is a bit of a letdown.

    Simon Vance is a little too subdued for my tastes in his reading of this book. With such flamboyant characters the story would have been better served with a more emotional rendering in the dialog scenes. Vance is excellent in translating the words on the page into sounds in your ear. For the most part he is unobtrusive and this makes it possible for him to become the sub-vocal voice-in-your-head that every reader experiences when reading a book on your own.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Tokyo Raider: A Tale of the Grimnoir Chronicles

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 8 mins)
    • By Larry Correia
    • Narrated By Bronson Pinchot
    Overall
    (128)
    Performance
    (125)
    Story
    (125)

    With the Japanese Imperium at war with the Soviet Union, and the United States watching cautiously on the sidelines, Second Lieutenant Joe Sullivan of the U.S. Marines is sent on a dangerous mission to Tokyo. The Russians have Summoned a demon of epic proportions to attack the city, and all that stands in its deadly path is an untested Japanese super-robot. Now, Joe is at the controls, his gravity-spiking Power at the ready. But that is one huge, mean Demon....

    Michael says: "Correia and Pinchot Hit A Grand Slam"
    "…..The Enemy of My Enemy is My Friend....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Now twenty years after WARBOUND we learn, in passing, what Francis and Fae are up to. The son of Jake and Origami joins forces with the Imperium to defeat a foe that could threaten the world if not stopped on the Island. Knowing that Larry Correia is still playing in the Grimnoir world leaves hope for a follow-up novel in the future. This little teaser makes me want more.

    Bronson Pinchot is top-notch as usual.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Murder on the Orient Elite: A Tale of the Grimnoir Chronicles

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 14 mins)
    • By Larry Correia
    • Narrated By Bronson Pinchot
    Overall
    (59)
    Performance
    (56)
    Story
    (56)

    In this brand-new Grimnoir Chronicles story written exclusively for Audible, it's 1937 - four years after the Grimnoir Society defeated the magical alien force known as The Power. "Heavy" Jake Sullivan is summoned by his oddest ally, Dr. Wells, to stop the bombing of a new ultra-luxury airship. Amid the glitz, the gambling, and the high-society types, Sullivan races time to hunt for the saboteur. But surrounded by a blimp-full of Germans, Russians, Imperium Iron Guard, and other magical enemies - where can he even begin?

    Matthew E. Bowman says: "An Excellent Teaser"
    "…..Travel in Style....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a fine short story set four years after the events in WARBOUND. It was great to keep up with Jake Sullivan and the Alienist. The real joy was hearing Bronson Pinchot exercise his talents again.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Chapterhouse Dune

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Frank Herbert
    • Narrated By Euan Morton, Katherine Kellgren, Scott Brick, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (753)
    Performance
    (444)
    Story
    (456)

    The desert planet Arrakis, called Dune, has been destroyed. Now, the Bene Gesserit, heirs to Dune's power, have colonized a green world - and are tuning it into a desert, mile by scorched mile. Chapterhouse Dune is the last book Frank Herbert wrote before his death and stunning climax to the epic Dune legend that will live on forever.

    Loren A Goodwin says: "Unchallenged Series Finale"
    "…..Bucket list complete....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Back in the day I read the original DUNE and then followed with DUNE MESSIAH and CHILDREN OF DUNE, but then I stopped because I didn't like the direction the series was going. Over the intervening years I kept hearing high praise for the rest of the series. I just wasn't motivated enough to undertake reading all six books. But now that they are available on Audio I thought I would give it a try. After all I had been richly rewarded in a similar situation involving the works of Neal Stephenson. (I had avoided The Baroque Cycle after loving Snowcrash but disliking The Diamond Age) So, in the case of the Dune novels I felt compelled to check off this nagging omission from my bucket list. I was hopefully expecting a buried treasure. Sadly, my original estimation was confirmed. The original DUNE is wonderful and inventive, fresh and new. The balance of the Dune novels are slow plodding—focused too much on fanciful, imagined philosophy. The second book, DUNE MESSIAH, reads like an outline—just advancing the plot so the third, CHILDREN OF DUNE can be told. This third book has some mildly interesting characters and promises a Space Opera scale expansion of the story for the remaining novels. The fourth, GOD EMPEROR OF DUNE, documents the tyrannical reign of human-turned-worm Leto II but does not make good use of the vast scale of a multiple-planet empire. The creepy giant larvae-like emperor, and his entire dialog, seems less then majestic or oppressive, as later recollections will portray his reign. The idea is there but the execution is lacking. The next, HERETICS OF DUNE, advances the plot but leaves much to be desired when it comes to holding my interest; which it could have done with more interesting people or with witty dialog (Again the reader is referred to The Baroque Cycle). And this last novel is no improvement. Mercifully, Frank Herbert ended his series with CHAPTERHOUSE DUNE. This last novel has the same feel as the previous two books. I did not like it. And unless someone can convince me that the other Dune books, written by Frank Herbert’s son are of a completely different quality, my exploration of Dune is at an end.

    As a public service I can say that if you enjoy exploring the outlining of a future society based on treachery and long range planning—but without fleshing out the characters or establishing an engaging storyline, then the last five Dune novels may be for you. My chief complaint is that the new characters which necessarily populate the later novels are just not very interesting. I was never made to care about them and so had a hard time following their concerns.

    I sympathize with the plight of the narrators. The dissertation-like nature of the text as a sociological treatise demands a slow monotone reading, and the narrators faithfully comply.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Heretics of Dune: Dune Chronicles, Book 5

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Frank Herbert
    • Narrated By Simon Vance, Scott Brick
    Overall
    (796)
    Performance
    (454)
    Story
    (459)

    On Arrakis, now called Rakis, known to legend as Dune, 10 times 10 centuries have passed. The planet is becoming desert again. The Lost Ones are returning home from the far reaches of space. The great sandworms are dying, and the Bene Gesserit and the Bene Tleilax struggle to direct the future of Dune. The children of Dune's children awaken as from a dream, wielding the new power of a heresy called love.

    John says: "Mixed Feelings"
    "…..Variations on a Theme....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Here many of the political and religious plot lines begin to converge. Set thousands of years after the time of Paul; this novel exemplifies one of the problems of a wide scope Space Opera that extends over such vast time scales: The writer has to introduce a new set of characters for every installment. Frank Herbert strives to overcome this problem in his series by always having an Atreides in a key role. He always has a Bene Gesserit trying to pull the strings behind the scenes. And, of course, the recurring figure of Duncan Idaho again makes an appearance in one of his many clones. This novel has some interesting personalities placed in these standard roles and for this reason holds my interest better than the other sequels so far. At the end of the day, it is still a far cry from the drama of the original. By the end I was longing for a conniving villain like baron Harkonnen to add a little drama.

    Simon Vance again reads the text. His delivery is uncomfortably dispassionate and leads to the depiction of strangely uncomfortable antiseptic coitus in more than one scene. This book gives me a chance to editorialize: There is something commendable in translating a book from the print to the audio format with as little deviation from the mood of the original. I would say that there is a higher commendation deserved in taking a stolid, phlegmatic novel and imparting some sense of drama to it that would make it a more entertaining listening experience.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • God Emperor of Dune

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Frank Herbert
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1159)
    Performance
    (691)
    Story
    (704)

    More than 3,000 years have passed since the first events recorded in Dune. Only one link survives with those tumultuous times: the grotesque figure of Leto Atreides, son of the prophet Paul Muad'Dib, and now the virtually immortal God Emperor of Dune. He alone understands the future, and he knows with a terrible certainty that the evolution of his race is at an end unless he can breed new qualities into his species.

    Joel D Offenberg says: "Almost as good as the original"
    "…..The Worm Turns....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    While a necessary part of the sequence of the saga, this is the most uncharacteristic novel in the series. Clearly the figure of the God Emperor is pivotal to the development of the series, but I found this installment merely a place-holder for the era of the Tyrant. I think the account of Leto II and his millennia-long empire could have been handled better as a brief retrospective in the next novel Heretics of Dune than it was executed here as a novel-length episode of its own. Herbert fails to impart the necessary sense of vitality and irresistible power that the figure of the God Emperor holds in the story. The dialog for Leto II is so feeble and mundane that it is a wonder that such an impotent personality could wield such megalomaniac power over all of mankind on many different worlds.

    Simon Vance again handles the reading. He is excellent at enunciating each word perfectly so Frank Herbert’s words come through without alteration. I would have enjoyed it more had he played Emperor Leto II with a bit of campy melodrama—it would have been so much more fun.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Children of Dune

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Frank Herbert
    • Narrated By Scott Brick, Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1548)
    Performance
    (888)
    Story
    (911)

    The sand-blasted world of Arrakis has become green, watered, and fertile. Old Paul Atreides, who led the desert Fremen to political and religious domination of the galaxy, is gone. But for the children of Dune, the very blossoming of their land contains the seeds of its own destruction. The altered climate is destroying the giant sandworms, and this in turn is disastrous for the planet's economy.

    Ziya says: "great story, more production problems"
    "…..Dune the Next Generation....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Here Herbert expands the scope of the story to make this a true Space Opera. This is a somewhat satisfying follow-up to the classic Dune. Here it becomes plain that he has an epic planned. He begins to lay down the political foundations for the balance of the series.

    Simon Vance handles the great majority of the narration. He is a fine reader. I find that his voices for young children do not have a youthful energy. This sometimes gets in the way when I was trying to visualize a scene in my mind.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Dune Messiah

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 57 mins)
    • By Frank Herbert
    • Narrated By Scott Brick, Katherine Kellgren, Euan Morton, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2376)
    Performance
    (1370)
    Story
    (1390)

    The second Dune installment explores new developments on the planet Arrakis, with its intricate social order and strange, threatening environment. Dune Messiah picks up the story of the man known as Muad'Dib, heir to a power unimaginable, bringing to fruition an ambition of unparalleled scale: the centuries-old scheme to create a superbeing who reigns not in the heavens but among men. But the question is: DO all paths of glory lead to the grave?

    Andrew says: "A nice continuation"
    "…..Bridge to Book Three....."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    My impression of this book remains unchanged from my reading of the print version many years ago: It is just a necessary linking novel to the next volume.

    Again the production is quite good, with several narrators taking the task of delivering certain sections. Simon Vance handles the bulk of the narration. And while I appreciate Vance’s obvious talents in sight reading, his limited range of characterizations sometimes causes the various characters to blend together.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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