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Deanna

.

United States | Member Since 2012

8
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 9 reviews
  • 62 ratings
  • 367 titles in library
  • 97 purchased in 2014
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  • The Quilter's Apprentice: Elm Creek Quilts, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Jennifer Chiaverini
    • Narrated By Christina Moore
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (266)
    Performance
    (238)
    Story
    (241)

    An engaging tale full of warmth and wisdom, The Quilter’s Apprentice is the first novel in best-selling author Jennifer Chiaverini’s Elm Creek Quilts series. Sarah McClure takes a job helping elderly Sylvia Compson prepare her family estate for sale. Sylvia, a master quilter, agrees to share the tricks of the trade with Sarah. As the two women grow close, Sylvia shares her family’s tragic past, compelling Sarah to look at her own life more closely.

    jenny says: "I'm hooked!"
    "A Mixed Bag"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    While I finished the book, the story was slow and only mildly interesting. It was a struggle to finish, but I neither liked nor hated it. The narrator was good, and created a large variety of voices.

    This book is about a woman that is temporarily employed to clean up a mansion. She begins to learn quilting from the owner, and eventually learns about the owner and her family's past.

    I liked the realistic quality of the human interactions and conflict. That being said, I found the main character's low self esteem and lack of confidence to be grating, sometimes. She's supposed to be older than I am, but her spineless moments seem better suited to a teenager with little experience in the real world. Also, there were times when a character wouldn't make a logical jump, but they had all the information necessary to make it. There is nothing more frustrating than a writer that makes her characters slow on the uptake. Oh, and the men in the story are all flat, two-dimensional characters--even Sarah's husband and Sylvia's "wild" brother!

    I think I enjoyed the end more because it meant I was finished with the book than because it actually satisfied me. Everything came together too neatly, like a fairy tale, and all the flaws that made the people realistic before the last two chapters suddenly disappeared or were resolved in a day--including 50 years of bitter animosity.

    Altogether, I only recommend this if you really like quilting and repressed people, or quaint stories with strong morals and a PG-rating, and not a lot of introspection, deep or otherwise. If you have never quilted, expect your eyes to glaze over when they discuss technique--which is not too often, thankfully.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Soul Mirror: A Novel of the Collegia Magica

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By Carol Berg
    • Narrated By Angele Masters
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (134)
    Performance
    (127)
    Story
    (126)

    With no magic talent of her own, Anne de Vernase must take on her sister's magical legacy to unravel the secrets behind the dark sorcery besieging the royal city of Merona-and to uncover the truth behind her sister's death. For Portier de Savin-Duplais, failed student of magic, sorcery's decline into ambiguity and cheap illusion is but a culmination of life's bitter disappointments.

    Karen says: "Excellent Story!"
    "Not my Favorite"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    To begin, you should know that I absolutely loved "The Spirit Lens," which got its fair share of ho-hum reviews. It would appear that, once again, I am in the minority of reviewers on this book, as I did not find it nearly as engaging as its predecessor.

    Why? Anne is an alright character, but she spends a heck of a lot of book time "discovering" things that the listener should already know from The Spirit Lens--like certain secret events or the true morality of characters that Anne is initially prejudiced against. I had more than a few moments of dislike for Anne in the beginning because of this--how dare she say anything negative about Duplais, the brat??

    My next issue is this: nothing happens. I mean, really--the story is stagnant until the last 3 hours. Interspersed with Anne's "new" discoveries were a lot of unnecessary details--it felt as if I were listening to different characters conversing on a topic where they had all read the same textbook (they all spouted the same information, just with different speach patterns). It was enough to make me want to tear my hair out!

    In the first book, I was on the edge of my proverbial seat as Duplais discovered more secrets and intrigue, shared nuggets of wisdom, recalled pertinent experiences, or struggled with shifting loyalties. Not to mention the several deaths and/or assassination attempts, the torture, kidnappings, and hilariously air-headed comments from Ilario!

    In this book, Anne is brought to court by Duplais and is living a life with the ladies-in-waiting to the Queen. How in the WORLD is there not more interaction with these girls if she is expected to do her adventuring in stolen moments between lessons on court life, or in the middle of the night? How are the other ladies at court so vapid compared to her? It was almost like the author was shoving Anne's brilliance down my throat. The only people worth notice by the author are those in power--or those conveniently placed to deliver messages (ie. servants). At one point, Anne claims one of the servants as her first friend at court and I had an "Ergh!?" moment, as she had only spoken to her about three times and never had any real downtime with her--she was always the mistress and the servant was always a tool for her, despite Anne benevolently allowing her to cry on her shoulder once.

    Plus, all of the characters that I was fascinated with in The Spirit Lens were background fodder here. Most of the story is about Anne, and Anne's thoughts on her late sister, her missing father, her hostage brother, her insane mother, her readings, her suspicions of intrigue, and her re-consideration of past events, etc. I would say 80% of this book takes place in her head, as it is not "safe" for Anne to interview anyone and most everyone despises her. Rather, she finds notes and letters and trinkets littered throughout the castle--as if these people would be stupid enough to leave a paper trail!

    I will say, when she gained the ability to converse in her head with a mysterious Friend I was so starved for character interaction that I was practically shaking with anticipation for each scene. On the other hand, I knew who it was almost immediately and kept waiting for some side scenes during which their real-life interactions could contrast with the mental ones. Never happened. Anne ends up becoming busom buddies with her Friend in about 5 minutes, which belies her previous tendencies toward extreme prejudice. I don't buy the magical explanation.

    I've already read the third book (actually, before I finished this, shame on me!), and I can say that there is a lack of emotion in The Soul Mirror and the Daemon Prism that disappoints me. There is NO humor in this book, and the constant negativity exhausted me. Plus, HELLO, Ilario was totally in love with Duplais at the end of The Spirit Lens--I can read between the lines! That aspect is completely gone from this book onward, but rather is explained away as Ilario's "wondering" epiphany that Duplais must be a saint reborn. HA! I scoff at that. Way to ruin one of the most interesting and delicate facets to the story, Berg!

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Spy Glass

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Maria V. Snyder
    • Narrated By Jennifer Van Dyck
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (276)
    Performance
    (150)
    Story
    (151)

    Opal Cowan has lost her powers. She can no longer create glass magic. More, she's immune to the effects of magic. Opal is now an outsider looking in, spying through the glass on those with the powers she once had, powers that make a difference in the world. Until spying through the glass becomes her new power. Suddenly, the beautiful pieces she makes flash in the presence of magic. And then she discovers that someone has stolen some of her blood--and that finding it might let her regain her powers.

    Elizabeth says: "Satisfying conclusion to the Glass trilogy"
    "A Rebuttal"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The only reason I'm reviewing this book is because of all of the low reviews. Many people are claiming they loved Snyder's previous books, but hate these, and that the main character is sick and twisted and the torture is horrible, etc.

    If you've liked Storm Glass and Sea Glass, you'll probably like Spy Glass. Rather than a story of Stockholm Syndrome (puh-lease, if anyone had that it was Yelena!), this is a story about redemption, forgiving people, and facing your fears and inner shame. If you're worried that you might be about to listen to some abuse-supportive material, read on and be reassured. As someone that has been the victim of abuse, I can tell you this story did not raise any alarms for me. Doesn't mean it won't for others, but I don't speak for others anyway.

    Have you ever dated someone that had a drug problem? That's how I see Devlin in this series--controlled by his vices and out of touch with society--but then he gets rehab and is slowly becoming someone free of that. I know I have trouble avoiding M&Ms some days--I can't imagine struggling with something as addicting as blood magic (or drugs). Of course, when Devlin becomes a major part of Opal's life, all of the terrible things he did are firmly behind him. The fact that people have such violently disapproving reactions to him shows an intolerance for imperfection in the literary fantasy world. Let me make it clear--there is a gradual development of friendship which is almost a self-healing process for Opal that develops into more. She is not being tortured or treated maliciously by him at any point after this begins. She meets with him in very controlled environments at first, and she struggles with her past experiences. It is in no way an easy transition for her! She goes back and forth internally for MONTHS with the idea of a reformed Devlin.

    I think the main reason people dislike this book so much is because it doesn't follow the typical pattern for redeemed characters: 1) the bad deeds happened a long time ago or the person was "duped" in some way, thus distancing and/or excusing the actions; 2) the horrible deeds were never done to the same person that chooses to love them, ugly past and all. I admire Snyder for tackling such a difficult character and laying it all out there.

    Having said all that ... This book is not all centered around Devlin (he is serving a 5 year prison sentence, for goodness sake (!) and appears mostly during Opal's inner musings). There is still an action-packed plot with lots of twists and turns. Opal is trying to continue finding ways to help people despite her loss of glass magic, and she encounters a brand new enemy that arises from deeply rooted past conflicts. (Unlike Devlin, the bad guy acts with his rational thinking mind and shows acute pleasure in others' pain.) About three hours from the end, the stuff really hits the fan. Be prepared to listen to all of that in one go. Enjoy!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Bloodlust: Blood Destiny, Book 5

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Helen Harper
    • Narrated By Saskia Maarleveld
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (164)
    Performance
    (153)
    Story
    (155)

    Life's no fun being a dragon, especially when you are forced into responsibilities that involve trying to keep the peace between an array of shifters, mages, and faeries in order to bring down the scariest and deadliest foe the Otherworld has ever seen. And that's not to mention the fact that your own soul mate hates your guts. Mack Smith, a fiery Draco Wyr, is battling to come to terms with her emotions, her heritage, and her true capabilities. All she has to do is defeat Endor, win back Corrigan, and live happily ever after.

    Deanna says: "Mixed Emotions"
    "Mixed Emotions"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Unfortunately, this final installment was a little bit of a dud for me. It started out alright, with some fun scenes that quickly deteriorated to the illogical. In a way, I was reminded of the first book a lot. Mack was obtuse in some seriously annoying and (to me) unrealistic ways, and the entire novel is centered around her anger and resentment at feeling like she has to be self-sacrificing. Added to this is the fact that, suddenly, she does not feel like it is appropriate to hold her friends accountable for their behavior! I don't know where this attitude came from, but she just kept rolling over for others and then complaining about it in her head the entire time. At one point, she justifies it because of her fear of being alone. That just DOES NOT wash with me. If she really felt concerned about being alone, she wouldn't have dropped her lifelong shifter friends (Tom, Betsy, Julia) without so much as a spare thought. Also .. Alex, Solus, Corrigan, Aubrey, the pink demon librarian, Mrs. Alcoon ... how is she alone?!

    The bad guy is never really fleshed out this time around. He has got to be the least memorable of all the bad guys in this series, which is completely at odds with the fact that he's supposed to be the biggest nasty they've faced so far. What were his motives? He reminded me of a robot with no feelings that just went through the motions, as if he were just a vessel for someone else to work through.

    Also, there are some very unnecessary scenes in this story, which is even more disappointing because of how well I thought the previous book was handled. There is a scene in an Unseelie club that just seems pointless, a sudden love interest for Solus that does not make any sense, and some random and sloppy gallivanting that could very well have happened behind the scenes.

    I wanted to give the story 4 stars due to my relief at a happy ending ending and some closure on previously unexplored subjects, such as Mack's secret dragon nature and her mysteriously absent family. Honestly, with the way Harper had been increasing the severity of character deaths in the previous books, I wasn't expecting either Mack or Corrigan to be alive by the end of it all. Then again, maybe that's how it should have ended, because the bogus happy ending is really what dropped my rating down to 3 stars.

    ******Extreme Spoilers!!!!******
    Before I address the ending, here's an example of Mack's rediscovered obtusity: after the first hour of this book, it will become painfully obvious to the reader that Mack is pregnant. In my experience, it is most definitely NOT the last thing on a woman's mind if she is a reproductively healthy female. Mack does not even admit to herself that there is a possibility she is pregnant, despite the fact that Mrs. Alcoon practically starts knitting baby booties and painting the spare bedroom in pastel colors. Barfing, stomach aches, detesting the smell of coffee, sudden uncontrollable shifting--come on! It would have been much more believable for Mack to recognize the possibility, then refuse to investigate out of fear or denial or putting it off because she's so busy being a martyr. Even in this scenario, we could have been introduced to her thoughts, worries, and curiosities on the subject. As it goes, Corrigan tells her she's pregnant in the last hour of the book--which I also find to be a ridiculous scenario--and she doesn't even have a "Holy crap, there's something invading my body and it's going to take over my life" moment. Her reaction is simply, "Oh, rats, I guess that makes sense! Babies are ... hmm. Well, time to go be badass again!"

    Oh, and Corrigan! Talk about character backsliding! I know he was dumped publicly, but he becomes more of a hostile decoration in this book than anything. I can totally dig some good arguments, but he and Mack don't even have a real conversation until the big baby reveal at the end. Pardon me for not buying that for one second, by the way, seeing as how in the previous books they were drawn to each other like magnets and they are supposedly soul mates.

    And the big happy ending? Yes, they fly off into the sunset together, but in doing so they abandon everyone they know and love. In what world is it better to leave everyone for the wolves and run away to live in hiding while simultaneously destroying your best friends' wedding? I never thought Mack and Corrigan would turn out to be cowards, but that's what this ending was. I wish they had found the inner strength to acknowledge that their own happiness was worth standing up for, even if it meant losing some political power or being criticized.

    In fact, the ending doesn't make sense from any viewpoint to me. In the story, everyone depends on Mack uniting the races as a neutral power and Corrigan being a newer, gentler breed of Lord Alpha. With their faked deaths, the races will never remain united and the shifters may very well return to their old massacring ways. Despite their arrogant demands, there is no way the Summer Queen and the Arch Mage have the ability to force Mack to stay away from Corrigan--especially considering she's been pregnant with his babies the whole freaking time. That ship sailed waaaaay before they even got to the pier. As it stands, the pair end up leaving the world exactly as it was before their rise to power.

    Why couldn't Corrigan just retire from being Lord Alpha and be Mack's right hand man? Why couldn't she marry Corrigan as Lord Alpha and have her children fostered in Fairyland every summer, then educated by the mages for the rest of the year in order to maintain a balanced relationship between the races? That little bit about dragonkind being cursed by auto assassins--well, there are ways to break a curse. If Mack could go off to Russia on the off chance of finding an almost extinct race of midget to get some precious metal that a friend of a friend read about in an old history document, then is it really so hard to believe in a happily married couple that kicks butt and saves the dragon race from genocide? Certainly not! Married couples can still have passion, witty dialogues, inner turmoil, and withstand hardships that separate family members under stressful circumstances. Just look at dual military families!

    Helen Harper, if you read this, I hope you write one more book in which Corrigan and Mack return with some adorably chubby toddlers to fix these wrongs! BAH!

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Blood Politics: Blood Destiny, Book 4

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By Helen Harper
    • Narrated By Saskia Maarleveld
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (244)
    Performance
    (223)
    Story
    (222)

    You'd think that life would finally be dealing Mack Smith a kind hand. Living in London and with the opening of the new and improved city version of Clava Books mere days away, things appear to be settling down. Other than the terrible nightmares about dragons, that is. Or the fact that she's being constantly tailed by a string of mages, shifters, and faeries, all of whom are constantly demanding her attention. And that's without even bringing the temptation of Corrigan, Lord Alpha of the Brethren, into the equation.

    Sarah Silverstone says: "Disappointing - Quality Sacrificed to Create Drama"
    "A Roller Coaster All the Way"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am not the kind of person that becomes absorbed by audiobooks easily, which is why these little-known books are such an incredible surprise to me. In the Blood Destiny series, Helen Harper has created an outstanding balance between world building and character development, often conveyed in a way that I am not expecting.

    This book, HANDS DOWN, has got to be the best so far in the series. I laughed myself silly multiple times--and cried a bit at the end. Mack's normal scathing wit is still present, but she continues to reflect personal growth through increased control and self reflection with none of the irritating back-sliding found in many other popular urban fantasies. A delightful turn leaves newer character, Aubrey (master vampire), as a constant source of ridiculous fun, though to be honest I almost had a nervous breakdown when he first appeared in this book. Additionally, Corrigan makes juuust enough frequent and short appearances when he is not directly involved in the proceedings to prevent the story from feeling like an obstacle to the wicked fun interactions between he and Mack.

    Oh, and the story? Instead of thrusting us directly into a stagnant world of magical intrigue, Mack's new situation is conveyed through a creative slant: taking a vacation from it all. Of course, the relaxation part of the vacation goes up in a ball of fiery death almost instantly when Mack volunteers to run a few harmless errands during her free time. Who knew helping out some gentle dryads and a greedy troll could cause so much mayhem?

    Almost every character that has been introduced in the series makes an appearance in either memory or reality, but their placement and timing are so well done that it doesn't feel like a single scene is frivolous. Of course, I do have some small complaints--several major characters are described exactly the same in every single book, and their descriptions are so sparse that it is a noticeable feature. It would be great to get a new detail thrown in every now and again to flesh out their image--though this may be done on purpose to allow the reader's imagination to fill in the blanks. Also, there is some rare word repetition (example: "She noticed the gleam of the silver, gleaming dagger," or something like that). The quality of the content tends to highlight these mistakes, although there are only one or two instances of it. Saskia Maarleveld does a fabulous job when this happens, never indicating any sort of awkward hitch or pause in her reading.

    Oh and, by the way, I had never heard of Saskia Maarleveld before listening to these audiobooks. I don't think there's any way I could forget her after her performance on this series, though! Her skill at conveying a variety of emotions for a multitude of different characters while maintaining their unique accents, pitches, and speech patterns completely amazes and captivates me. Would I love these books so much if I were reading them directly? I honestly don't think so because my reading voice sucks toads compared to her performance, and she lends a dimension to the story that I could never give. I hope Harper and Maarleveld continue to work together for the next forty years, because I don't think they would ever produce a novel I wouldn't want to listen to. In fact, I think I'm going to go listen to the next book right now!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Cocaine Blues

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Kerry Greenwood
    • Narrated By Stephanie Daniel
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (801)
    Performance
    (571)
    Story
    (574)

    It's the end of the roaring twenties, and the exuberant and Honourable Phryne Fisher is dancing and gaming with gay abandon. But she becomes bored with London and the endless round of parties. In search of excitement, she sets her sights on a spot of detective work in Melbourne, Australia. And so mystery and the beautiful Russian dancer, Sasha de Lisse, appear in her life. From then on it's all cocaine and communism until her adventure reaches its steamy end in the Turkish baths of Little Lonsdale Street.

    Barbara M. Sullivan says: "A series that just gets better"
    "Nobody likes a know-it-all"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I loved the setting and the subtly descriptive way that the author had of fleshing out the world in this novel--Australia in the 1920s, I believe it was. However, the main character does not grow in this book. She comes equipped with every skill she could possibly need to save her life, regardless of the ridiculousness and her young age. The author has Phryne accomplish these random and sometimes quite difficult tasks with no more effort than slipping on a new hat, and tries to make a joke of it by having Phryne mention how it was jolly good luck she'd slept with that gigalo in Paris or rubbed elbows that one time with a race car driver!

    In the end, while the story was entertaining, the main character came off as an inconsistently pretentious know-it-all without much thought in her head beyond social interactions, feminism, clothes, and sex. Luckily, the predictable mystery is tailored to her exact experiences, or I don't think I could ever have believed she would solve it.

    Unlike the fairly tame Royal Spyness novels, this book could be considered slightly racy, although not especially graphic. The content is a solid PG-13, and does not necessarily contain realistic consequences for anyone's actions. I don't think I would recommend it for men, as the only men in the story are witnesses, criminals, or foreign lovers that are never developed beyond a flat and stereotypical role.

    As for the narration, it was somewhat mediocre with the occasional spot on voice for a minor character. Nothing irritating, but also nothing incredible here.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Modern Witch: A Modern Witch, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Debora Geary
    • Narrated By Martha Harmon Pardee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (910)
    Performance
    (823)
    Story
    (844)

    Lauren is downtown Chicago's youngest elite realtor. She's also a witch. She must be - the fetching spell for Witches' Chat isn't supposed to make mistakes. So says the woman who coded the spell, at least. The tall, dark, and handsome guy sent to assess her is a witch too (and no, that doesn't end the way you might think). What he finds in Lauren will change lives, mess with a perfectly good career, and require lots of ice cream therapy.

    ShySusan says: "Perfect antidote for vampire & zombie overdoses"
    "PG-rated Nora Roberts meet Chicken Soup"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Here's what you need to know if you are debating about whether or not to buy this book.

    1. Do you like the *friendships* in Nora Roberts' books?
    2. Do you like Chicken Soup for the Soul?
    3. Do you prefer your audiobooks to have nothing more than a deep kiss here, a coy look there, and nary a swear word in sight?
    4. Do you live in Northern California, Oregon, or Washington, or find yourself drawn to people that are from these states?

    If you answered yes to all of these, you will probably adore this book. If you answered yes to 1-3, you will probably really enjoy this book.

    Still unsure? Let me give you some more details.

    The narrator does not have an incredible range of voices, but she does have the perfect cadence. Her voice hypnotized me without putting me to sleep, and her slow, careful reading caused me to slowly and carefully soak up the world within this audiobook.

    The plot is pleasant and without suspense. A woman is told she is a witch after stumbling across an internet spell, and she meets a witch family and starts training with them. Most of the characters in this story are family or lifelong friends, so there is an undertone of affection in almost all of the interactions. The second book introduces a few characters that do not always get along or like everyone, so if you need a little conflict I would recommend that you skip to that one. If you're looking for a cheerful, relaxing listen that will give you a dose of positivity, you've found it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Touch of the Demon: Kara Gillian, Book 5

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Diana Rowland
    • Narrated By Liv Anderson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (355)
    Performance
    (325)
    Story
    (326)

    Kara Gillian is in some seriously deep trouble. She’s used to summoning supernatural creatures from the demon realm to our world, but now the tables have been turned and she’s the one who’s been summoned. Kara is the prisoner of yet another demonic lord, but she quickly discovers that she’s far more than a mere hostage. Yet waiting for rescue has never been her style, and Kara has no intention of being a pawn in someone else’s game.

    Leesa says: "Best one yet!!"
    "Unexpected"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book was a surprise to me, and I know from browsing other reviews that a lot of people were disappointed by it. However, that disappointment seems to stem from the shift in setting, and less from a change in the ability of the author.

    First, the setting of this book is like a classic fantasy novel, with little to no relation to the settings of the previous novels (urban fantasy vs high fantasy). If you hold extreme dislike for high fantasy, you may not like this book.

    Second, as with most high fantasy novels, there is a lot of world building, which accounts for the length of this novel. It is more than twice the length of the previous books.

    Third, a lot of character development takes place in this book. Characters make choices that have a permanent effect on their place in Kara's life, as well as affecting her behavior and feelings. Many of these changes are negative, and a lot of people appear to dislike the betrayals, newfound friends, etc.

    Fourth, there is only an abstract mystery versus the normal "examine the clues to catch the killer." Everything about the world she is in is a mystery, with no clear resolution to be had.

    Normally, I would not enjoy a book like this. However, the characters are what make the books so awesome for me, and it is why I spent all of my free time enjoying this audiobook. Rowland does not lose her touch with the realistic portrayal of emotional reaction, and she never forgets to question things in the right places or address sticky situations. Despite all of the world building, there is still a lot of time devoted to dialogue, and the plot is never allowed to grow stale or stagnate. I felt what Kara felt, and it is why I loved this book.

    As always, the narrator is excellent. In fact, if I read this book instead of listened to it, I may have had more trouble with the transition from urban to high fantasy. If you're on the fence about this one, I recommend trying it out. You can always return it if it's not for you!

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Jack Blank and Imagine Nation: Jack Blank Trilogy, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By Matt Myklusch
    • Narrated By Norbert Leo Butz
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (67)
    Performance
    (52)
    Story
    (53)

    A boy survives an attack by a robot-zombie and is smuggled away to a secret island full of aliens, super heroes - and the answers to his mysterious past. Matt Myklusch's Jack Blank and the Imagination Nation combines action, humor, adventue, heroes, villains, and superpowers for a knockout epic story.

    Michael says: "Needed More 'Imagine-Nation'...Zzzzzz"
    "Just not good"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    For the most part, my 10 year old was bored with this book. There were brief periods that she showed interest in the story, but they were very, very brief.

    As a parent, listening to this was painful. The characters are shallow, the narration is overly earnest (like someone might speak to a 3 year old), and the action drags along. There is, of course, a child trying to win against adults in this story--but nothing Jack does makes me think he *should* win against the adults. He does not go through any real struggle--rather, everything just seems to fall into his lap by luck or else because kind adults were looking out for him. This might be good for very young children that don't question magic and superheroes, but if you have a kid that likes a smart story, this one is not for you.

    Admittedly, I only made it halfway through the story, but I seriously wish I could get my time back.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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