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David

Golden, CO, USA

17
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 3 reviews
  • 18 ratings
  • 215 titles in library
  • 8 purchased in 2014
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  • Basin and Range: Annals of the Former World, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By John McPhee
    • Narrated By Nelson Runger
    Overall
    (196)
    Performance
    (52)
    Story
    (52)

    To geologists, rocks are beautiful, roadcuts are windowpanes, and the earth is alive, a work in progress. The cataclysmic movement that gives birth to mountains and oceans is ongoing and can still be seen at certain places on our planet. One of these is the Basin and Range region centered in Nevada and Utah.

    Julie says: "Wow."
    "Top notch"
    Overall

    McPhee does an excellent job of introducing geology. However, despite his excellent prose, pictures and maps would add to the experience.

    Worst thing is Nelson Runger's narration--while his avuncular style is well suited to McPhee's prose, the microphone picks up all of his lip-smacking noises. Once I became attuned to this, I couldn't get it out of my mind--he sounded like a dog eating peanut butter. Please, filter this out on your next book.

    11 of 14 people found this review helpful
  • The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Michael Pollan
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3568)
    Performance
    (1313)
    Story
    (1311)

    "What should we have for dinner?" To one degree or another, this simple question assails any creature faced with a wide choice of things to eat. Anthropologists call it the omnivore's dilemma. Choosing from among the countless potential foods nature offers, humans have had to learn what is safe, and what isn't. Today, as America confronts what can only be described as a national eating disorder, the omnivore's dilemma has returned with an atavistic vengeance.

    Stephen Redding says: "Great presentation of a moral dilemma"
    "Not exactly balanced, but pretty darn good"
    Overall

    Pretty interesting read, but too often lapses into knee jerk big farm=bad, agribusiness=evil, mentality without ever acknowledging the tremendous success of the agricultural revolution that produces more food than the world needs for the first time in history. And he never seems to understand the benefits of economies of scale. To be certain, corporate farming has gone too far and needs to be cut off from the government teat, but I don't think chicken coops and pig pens in every back yard is the answer either. a

    BUT THE NARRATOR!!! UGGGHHH Looking at the reviews here, he's a love him or hate him guy. If you liked Niedermayer's harangue in Animal House, you'll love Scott Brick. Every sentence is dripping with over the top theatrics.

    4 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Firoozeh Dumas
    • Narrated By Firoozeh Dumas
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (340)
    Performance
    (87)
    Story
    (85)

    In 1972, when she was seven, Firoozeh Dumas and her family moved from Iran to Southern California, arriving with no firsthand knowledge of this country beyond her father's glowing memories of his graduate school years here.

    Jerry says: "The melting pot, next generation"
    "Boring in English"
    Overall

    Mildly amusing but too lighthearted. Maybe I'm mistaken, but it would have been a little more interesting to offer a few more insights into what happened to her relatives in Iran, how they viewed the revolution, etc. I know this isn't supposed to be a treatise on the state of Muslims in America, but a few more insights into her beliefs would have been enlightening.

    Finally, while I love books read by the author (guaranteed to pronounce the names correctly), Firoozeh Dumas too often sounds like she is reading to a group of kindergartners.

    2 of 5 people found this review helpful

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