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Damian

Portland, OR, United States

30
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 6 reviews
  • 39 ratings
  • 168 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
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  • Does the Noise in My Head Bother You?: A Rock 'n' Roll Memoir

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Steven Tyler
    • Narrated By Jeremy Davidson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (416)
    Performance
    (292)
    Story
    (296)

    The son of a classical pianist straight out of the Bronx of old Archie comics, Steven Tyler was born to be a rock star. Weaned on Cole Porter, Nat King Cole, Mick and his beloved Janis Joplin, Tyler began tearing up the streets and the stage as a teenager before finally meeting his "mutant twin" and legendary partner, Joe Perry. In this addictively listenable memoir, Tyler unabashedly recounts the meteoric rise, fall, and rise of Aerosmith over the last three decades and riffs on the music that gives it all meaning.

    Damian says: "Reads true to the man and true to music"
    "Reads true to the man and true to music"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This reads as unadulterated Steven Tyler, his language, his world view, coming through clear. What really makes the book worthwhile is Tyler's love of music and his focus on that. The narrator is fine, though sounds like more of a tough guy than Tyler himself.

    Yes the endless litany of drugs, the sense of a whole life spent stoned, is a little disappointing, but that's part of the Tyler package...love of music and language and a mostly unexamined love of altered states...

    10 of 10 people found this review helpful
  • Spindrift

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Allen Steele
    • Narrated By Andy Caploe
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (244)
    Performance
    (137)
    Story
    (136)

    June 1, 2288 - Europe's first starship, the EASS Galileo, launches on its maiden voyage to investigate an unidentified object, code-named Spindrift, which is traveling outside our solar system. An object that may be alien in origin. The Galileo disappears soon after...February 1, 2344 - The Galileo's shuttle returns to Earth carrying three surviving expedition members, who still appear to be the same age they were when they departed. They report that they have, indeed, made contact with an extraterrestrial race.

    Ingar says: "Not bad"
    "Fun story, peters out a bit at the end"
    Overall

    I disagree with some of the other comments about the narrator. I liked his reading quite a bit, and thought it went very well with this kind of "hard science fiction." He only fell down on the voice of one character which is done as a bad Tommy Chong / 70's stoner impression--that just didn't work. (I think it's usually better when a narrator doesn't push "voices" and accents too hard).


    The book itself is a nicely paced space exploration story, very traditional and well worked out. Nothing innovative, but satisfying, until the final chapter or two when the story just kind of fades away. It might be because important revelations are being saved for other "Coyote" novels.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Songs of the Dying Earth: Stories in Honor of Jack Vance

    • UNABRIDGED (28 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Glen Cook, Gardner Dozois (editor), Neil Gaiman, and others
    • Narrated By Arthur Morey, Arthur Morey
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (109)
    Performance
    (61)
    Story
    (61)

    The anthology Songs of the Dying Earth has assembled one of the most distinguished casts of authors ever - including Dan Simmons, Neil Gaiman, George R. R. Martin, Paula Volsky, Mike Resnick, Robert Silverberg, Lucius Shepard, Tad Williams, Tanith Lee, Liz Williams, Glen Cook, and eleven other famous writers - to write stories in honor of the genius of Jack Vance, stories using the bizarre and darkly beautiful far future setting of the Dying Earth, near the very end of Earth's lifespan.

    Gary says: "The Snack that left me Ravenous"
    "Great Stories, So so reading"
    Overall

    I would have given this 5 stars--except for the fact that the reader is a real mis-match for the material. Morey has a voice and approach that would be great for a gritty realistic crime novel, but for these flights of fantasy, with an emphasis on flowing language and exotic locales Morey works against the material.

    You don't have to be a Vance fanatic to enjoy these tributes to his most famous creation - they are all finely wrought far future fairy tales, visionary and playful. This collection provides excellent storytelling for any lover of fantasy.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • The Name of the Wind: Kingkiller Chronicles, Day 1

    • UNABRIDGED (27 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Patrick Rothfuss
    • Narrated By Nick Podehl
    Overall
    (12240)
    Performance
    (9888)
    Story
    (10000)

    This is a tale of sorrow, a tale of survival, a tale of one man's search for meaning in his universe, and how that search, and the indomitable will that drove it, gave birth to a legend.

    Joanna says: "Wow!"
    "A little overhyped"
    Overall

    This was the "big debut" fantasy novel a year or two ago. Ultimately, it's just alright--just interesting enough that you might want to listen to the sequel, when it comes out, because none of the mysteries or questions or plot threads are even close to being wrapped up here.

    It is a very uneven novel, at points boring or too obvious or silly. Sometimes you can hear the author working too hard to make this a book about storytelling. At other times it is engaging and gripping. There are some good ideas here--but it is also very derivitive of Harry Potter and of A Wizard of Earthsea--the main action taking place at university for magic. It hooks you in enough that you then are frustrated with the parts of the book that seem amaeturish.

    The narration is excellent, and makes the novel hang together much better than it might have.

    5 of 14 people found this review helpful
  • The Secret Sharer and Other Stories

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Robert Silverberg
    • Narrated By Robertson Dean
    Overall
    (17)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (5)

    In "The Secret Sharer", a young untested officer is in command of a large starship carrying passengers in the form of digitized matrices. When a matrix breaks free of the storage circuit, crewmembers warn the young commander that the invisible matrix will try to inhabit a body.

    Abby Goldsmith says: "Held my interest"
    "Great stories, decent narration"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    There's something magical about Silverberg's best fiction--and the narration is decent enough, if a bit tinny sounding.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Modern Scholar: From Here to Infinity: An Exploration of Science Fiction Literature

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Michael D. C. Drout
    Overall
    (216)
    Performance
    (118)
    Story
    (116)

    The best science fiction asks essential questions: What does it mean to be human? Are we alone in the universe, and what does it mean if we're not? Esteemed professor Michael D. C. Drout traces the history of science fiction in this series of stimulating lectures. From Mary Shelley's Frankenstein to today's cutting- edge authors, Drout offers a compelling analysis of the genre, including a look at the golden age of science fiction, New Wave writers, and contemporary trends in the field.

    Timothy says: "Nerdy? Probably... Enjoyable? Yes"
    "Mostly accurate history of science fiction"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This lecture series was a lot of fun to listen to, and gives a good sense of the importance of science fiction as literature. It's not a perfect intro to SF, but has lots of good stuff. There are some mis-steps and mis-statements along the way, such as listing Ray Bradbury as a new wave author, or veering away from Campbell's golden age Astounding SF to spend too much time on HP Lovecraft, etc.

    9 of 9 people found this review helpful

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