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Cristina

Princeton, NJ, United States | Member Since 2010

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  • 170 titles in library
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  • The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Andrew Solomon
    • Narrated By Barrett Whitener
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (51)
    Performance
    (43)
    Story
    (42)

    With uncommon humanity, candor, wit, and erudition, National Book Award winner Andrew Solomon takes the listener on a journey of incomparable range and resonance into the most pervasive of family secrets. The Noonday Demon examines depression in personal, cultural, and scientific terms. Drawing on his own struggles with the illness and interviews with fellow sufferers, doctors and scientists, policymakers and politicians, drug designers and philosophers, Solomon reveals the subtle complexities and sheer agony of the disease.

    Daphne Stevens says: "If you want to get depressed...."
    "Moments of awesome but not clear message"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a great book if you want to hang out with depression in its many forms. It's like a fleamarket for depression-related thoughts, scenes, and events. There are moments of perfection - stories of assisted suicide, of people who attempt to get infected with HIV, insides of mental hospitals, individuals with moving life stories and many more.

    If this book had been written as a series of focused short stories, like 'The man who mistook his wife for a hat' or 'phantoms in the brain', it would have worked perfectly.

    As it is, the book seems long, at times a little scattered, and one sometimes can feel that they are reading a memoir of the author rather than a book about depression itself. It lacks a clear message: based mostly on personal stories with little synthesis, it is reminiscent of many other books about scientific topics that are written by non-experts with a journalistic bent - while fun, you may not really learn anything new.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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