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CHET YARBROUGH

Faced with mindless duty, when an audio book player slips into a rear pocket and mini buds pop into ears, old is made new again.

LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States | Member Since 2014

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HELPFUL VOTES
  • 278 reviews
  • 686 ratings
  • 0 titles in library
  • 34 purchased in 2015
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  • The Director

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By David Ignatius
    • Narrated By George Guidall
    Overall
    (420)
    Performance
    (372)
    Story
    (370)

    In David Ignatius' gripping new novel, spies don' t bother to steal information...they change it, permanently and invisibly. Graham Weber has been director of the CIA for less than a week when a Swiss kid in a dirty T-shirt walks into the American consulate in Hamburg and says the agency has been hacked, and he has a list of agents' names to prove it. This is the moment a CIA director most dreads. Weber isn' t sure where to turn until he meets a charismatic (and unstable) young man named James Morris who runs the Internet Operations Center.

    Charles says: "Well Done."
    "CONSPIRACY THEORIES"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Conspiracy theories are a jaded genre of fiction. The Director is marginally interesting because of Assange’s WikeLeaks, and Snowden’s NSA’ fiasco.

    The Director fails as a conspiracy theory thriller but succeeds in scaring anyone that believes in freedom (which does not infringe on others), and the right to privacy. If 50% of what Ignatius suggests cyber criminals are capable of is true, no economy; no government agency; no private individual is safe.

    Ignatius writes a story that suggests no security system exists that is not crack-able by a good hacker that understands computer coding and the gullibility of human beings. Ignatius infers–a good hacker with social engineering skill can crack any security system that is dependent on 1s and 0s. As a conspiracy theory story, The Director is boring and predictable but, as an exposé of cyber-crime, it is frightening.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • The Golem and the Jinni: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By Helene Wecker
    • Narrated By George Guidall
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4566)
    Performance
    (4183)
    Story
    (4177)

    Helene Wecker's dazzling debut novel tells the story of two supernatural creatures who appear mysteriously in 1899 New York. Chava is a golem, a creature made of clay, brought to life by a strange man who dabbles in dark Kabbalistic magic. When her master dies at sea on the voyage from Poland, she is unmoored and adrift as the ship arrives in New York Harbor. Ahmad is a jinni, a being of fire, born in the ancient Syrian Desert. Trapped in an old copper flask by a Bedouin wizard centuries ago, he is released accidentally by a tinsmith in a Lower Manhattan shop.

    Janice says: "What does it mean to be human?"
    "IMAGINATION"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Helene Wecker’s first novel opens a new world of imagination. As in all stories built on myth or legend, “The Golem and the Jinni” draws on universal human interest. Wecker explores differences between men and women, faith and religion, caring and not caring, love and friendship. The choice of George Guidell as narrator makes a good story even better.

    Forget what you think you know about a golem or jinni as a monster. In Wecker’s novel, the monster under the bed, or in your dream, is not a golem or jinni. The monster is you, a human being. Wecker cleverly reveals myths of Jewish and Islamic demons in a story that blends human nature with a perception of differences between masculine and feminine mystique. Along the way, Wecker raises issues of faith and religion; caring and not caring; love and friendship. Wecker creates two powerful mythological characters with a supporting cast that contrast and reveal the nature of human beings. Wecker’s golem is feminine; her jinni is masculine.

    At the story’s end, one hears an echo of the author’s view of love and friendship. Love and friendship lays somewhere between trust in what one says and the reality of what one does.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Rights of Man

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 18 mins)
    • By Thomas Paine
    • Narrated By Bernard Mayes
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (111)
    Performance
    (25)
    Story
    (24)

    Originally published in 1791 as a reply to Edmund Burke's Reflections on the French Revolution, as a vindication of the French Revolution, and as a critique of the British system of government, Rights of Man is unquestionably one of the great classics on the subject of democracy. Paine created a language of modern politics that brought important issues to the common man and the working classes. Employing direct, vehement prose, Paine defended popular rights, national independence, revolutionary war, and economic growth - all of which were considered, at the time, to be dangerous and even seditious issues. Paine's vast influence was due, in large measure to his eloquent literary style, noted for its poignant metaphors, vigor, and rational directness. With Rights of Man, Paine defended the dignity of men in all countries against all those who considered the average person to be merely one of the "swinish multitude." In the United States it fostered sympathy for France, while in Britain, it circulated among republican clubs and became a classic document in the working-class movement.

    Res Cogitans says: "poor recording"
    "OCCUPY WALL STREET"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It is past time for Americans to re-read Thomas Paine’s “Rights of Man”. Though his primary purpose is to refute Edmund Burke’s condemnation of the 1789 French revolution, his observations on British Aristocracy are the essence of today’s American “Money-ocracy”.

    The Occupy Wall Street demonstrations are an amorphous scream of disgust by an educated population that resents American “Money-ocracy’s” control of the economy, elected representatives, the election system, and the “Rights of Man”. “Money-ocracy” is an inheritable line of an American aristocracy.

    Stockholders in American companies need to fight employee compensation inflation that is disconnected from human productivity. Entrepreneurs that create productive enterprises should be rewarded by as much money, power, and prestige as their contribution warrants but not by ridiculous salaries that make a mockery of human productivity.

    “Occupy Wall Street” is an unlikely precursor of another American Revolution; however, it may be a symptom of an American cancer that debilitates productive life without killing the patient. “Occupying Wall Street” is not a hippie “sit in” but a plea for reform of American “Money-cracy” just as Thomas Paine’s “Rights of Man” was a plea for reform of Aristocratic inheritance.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Erik Larson
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1322)
    Performance
    (1110)
    Story
    (1110)

    On May 1, 1915, a luxury ocean liner as richly appointed as an English country house sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool, carrying a record number of children and infants. The passengers were anxious. Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone, and for months, its U-boats had brought terror to the North Atlantic.

    L. O. Pardue says: "What a Ride!"
    "THE LUSITANIA"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    History of the Lusitania is only vaguely, if at all, remembered by young Americans in 2015. Erik Larson spectacularly revivified WWI by chronicling the sinking of the Lusitania by a German’ submarine in 1915. In Larson’s detailed exposition, a reader/listener learns about early submarine warfare and its role in indiscriminate slaughter of civilians in war.

    In the beginning chapters of “Dead Wake”, the choice of Scott Brick as narrator seems inept. However, as the brutality of the story rises, Brick’s somber delivery fits the tone of Larson’s sharpened history of the Lusitania. After leaving New York, the Lusitania slipped beneath the sea in 18 minutes on May 1, 1915, only 11 miles off the Irish’ coast; on that date, 1,193 men, women, and children became victims of a torpedo attack by a German’ submarine. The submarine, christened the U20, sinks the Lusitania at sea between Ireland and England.

    Listeners will draw their own conclusion from Larson’s history of the sinking of the Lusitania. John F. Kennedy said, “Mankind must put an end to war before war puts an end to mankind”. Kennedy may have been referring to nuclear war but the story of the Lusitania suggests weapons are only a part of a slippery slope destined to end civilization.

    After World War I, “the number of people killed today” became a measure of success in war. Adolph Hitler, Winston Churchill, and Harry Truman reinforce belief in bombing civilian targets as a way of ending war. (Joseph Stalin is in the same group, but not so much as a bomber but as an amoral mass murderer.) The fundamental argument is that civilian deaths demoralize the enemy. Once war is declared, morality disappears. In war, there are no “good guys”. There are only victims.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Beethoven's Shadow

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 57 mins)
    • By Jonathan Biss
    • Narrated By Jeff Woodman
    Overall
    (594)
    Performance
    (521)
    Story
    (519)

    The American pianist Jonathan Biss is known to audiences throughout the world for his artistry, musical intelligence, and deeply felt interpretations. What is less known until now is that Jonathan Biss writes about music in a most compelling and engaging way. For anyone who has ever enjoyed a Beethoven concert or a Beethoven recording, or one of the many films about Beethoven, this audiobook is an inspiring listening experience.

    Carol C. Buchalter says: "An amazing glimpse into musical interpretation"
    "BEETHOVEN AND MUSICIANSHIP"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a panegyric for Beethoven and musical artists; i.e. a tribute to what makes Beethoven great and musicians talented.

    In this two-hour narration, one begins to understand why Beethoven’s music is important; what makes the difference between a good musician’s performance, and a great musician’s performance.

    Jonathan Bliss began taking Beethoven seriously at the age of ten. Bliss’s introduction to music became an obsession that began with emotion felt in listening to Beethoven’s Sonatas. He began practicing Beethoven’s most difficult pieces to develop muscle memory to exercise his technical talent but left an “in the moment” appreciation of Beethoven’s genius to future maturation. Bliss debuted at the New York Philharmonic in 2001 at the age of 21. He is the winner of the 2005 Leonard Bernstein Award and the Borletti-Buitoni Trust Award which suggests high qualification for his insight to musical quality and musicianship.

    There is an element of salesmanship in this vignette because Bliss is planning to produce recordings of all 32 Beethoven’ Sonatas. One is tempted to buy his first two albums to see how he escapes recording studio mediocrity.

    On balance, “Beethoven’s Shadow” offers insight to how far Beethoven’s shadow extends into the music world, what “real talent” is in composers and musicians, and what is gained and lost in studio recording of great music.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Atul Gawande
    • Narrated By Robert Petkoff
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (912)
    Performance
    (763)
    Story
    (753)

    In Being Mortal, bestselling author Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending. Medicine has triumphed in modern times, transforming birth, injury, and infectious disease from harrowing to manageable. But in the inevitable condition of aging and death, the goals of medicine seem too frequently to run counter to the interest of the human spirit.

    George K. says: "A Walk through the Valley of the Shadow"
    "LIFE'S LAST CHAPTER"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    “Being Mortal” is about life’s last chapter. Atul Gawande is an American surgeon and experienced author who is well qualified to write about human mortality; i.e. Gawande’s exceptional qualification is from a Stanford and Harvard education, and personal family’ experience. As a doctor, he understands the medical profession. As a son of a father that dies from complications of cancer and old age, Gawande experiences firsthand the complex nature of decision-making when one’s life is nearing its end.

    Gawande explains that doctors are principally trained to treat symptoms and causes of disease. “Being Mortal” suggests a medical customer’s desire at the end of life is as important as medical treatment. Gawande suggests modern medicine, by training, education, and experience, is frequently biased toward treatment rather than quality-of-life issues. Quality-of-life is a big part of the conscious and subconscious concern of terminal patients. Gawande argues that medical treatment for terminal patient’s is often too narrowly focused. If medical treatment only offers misery and pain from disease or old age, continuation of life should be a collaborative decision between doctor, patient, and family.

    Gawande suggests medical treatment should be customized to increase the number of moment to moment enjoyments that make life worth living for the elderly and terminally ill. There is no cure for death.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • 1984: New Classic Edition

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By George Orwell
    • Narrated By Simon Prebble
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4827)
    Performance
    (3289)
    Story
    (3320)

    George Orwell depicts a gray, totalitarian world dominated by Big Brother and its vast network of agents, including the Thought Police - a world in which news is manufactured according to the authorities' will and people live tepid lives by rote. Winston Smith, a hero with no heroic qualities, longs only for truth and decency. But living in a social system in which privacy does not exist and where those with unorthodox ideas are brainwashed or put to death, he knows there is no hope for him.

    Customer Bob says: "Great Book, With an Amazing Narrator"
    "Orwells' Relevance"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    George Orwell published “1984” in 1949. Orwell’s vision of totalitarianism, technology, and thought control match fears and failures of nations from the time of Churchill’s 1946 “Iron Curtain” speech to the present day. Orwell’s relevance seems as spot-on today as it was in 1949.

    Totalitarianism continues to reign in many parts of the world; particularly in the Middle East, parts of Asia, and Africa. Technology then and now is a threat to everyone’s privacy and self-determination. Advances in social media through Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, with the help of Google, Yahoo, and Bing, are encroaching on everyone’s right to privacy and personal thought.

    A striking parallel between Orwell’s “1984” and today is the inchoate and confused revolutionary zeal of Orwell’s hero/victim and the 21st century “Occupy Wall Street” movement. The “Occupy Wall Street” movement has little focus with protesters that cannot formulate an action plan to actualize their revolution. Today’s Moneyocracy is the Upper Class Comradeship in “1984” and the “Occupy Wall Street” protester is Orwell’s revolutionary hero/victim.

    Orwell is as prescient today as he was in 1949. However, a monumental difference lays in the rise of non-state terrorism. The statelessness of AL Qaeda like movements add a different dimension to Orwell’s “1984”. Invasion of privacy by nation-states, with a status qua objective, become more acceptable, even to democratically inclined nations. Drawing the line between freedom of choice and government control becomes more difficult.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Art of Critical Decision Making

    • ORIGINAL (12 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By The Great Courses, Michael A. Roberto
    • Narrated By Professor Michael A. Roberto
    Overall
    (318)
    Performance
    (275)
    Story
    (265)

    Learn to approach the critical decisions in your life with a more seasoned, educated eye with this fascinating 24-lecture series that explores how individuals, groups, and organizations make effective decisions. The heart of this accessible series is a thorough examination of decision making at three key levels. First, you'll look at decisions made at the individual level, where, among the many things you'll learn is that intuition is more than just a gut instinct and, in fact, represents a powerful pattern recognition capability.

    PHIL says: "Very rewarding, fulfilling its promise"
    "CRITICAL DECISION-DECISION MAKING"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    In the Great Courses’ lecture series, Dr. Michael Roberto, characterizes leadership in “The Art of Critical Decision Making”. Roberto’s primary methodology is examination of case studies that range from the Cuban missile crises, to the Daimler/Chrysler merger, to the 9/11/01 Trade Center bombing. He offers perspective on how good decisions can be made when complexity exceeds average to superior individual human capability.

    Roberto’s argument is that a structured participatory process is the most consistently productive form of critical decision-making. Roberto infers, as the world becomes more complex, individual comprehension and patterning of facts becomes less reliable as a form of critical decision-making. His argument relies on leadership structure that insists on communication transparency and qualified freedom. Roberto suggests leaders elicit ideas from engaged people, rather than only experts, in making critical decisions meant to identify problems, proffer solutions, and accomplish goals.

    Leaders need to engage employees whose ideas will be listened to, used, and appreciated rather than abjectly dismissed. Executives, who are more concerned about position than organizational effectiveness, are not leaders. They are cowards.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • One Hundred Years of Solitude

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Gabriel García Márquez
    • Narrated By John Lee
    Overall
    (721)
    Performance
    (634)
    Story
    (633)

    One of the 20th century's enduring works, One Hundred Years of Solitude is a widely beloved and acclaimed novel known throughout the world and the ultimate achievement in a Nobel Prize-winning career. The novel tells the story of the rise and fall of the mythical town of Macondo through the history of the Buendía family. Rich and brilliant, it is a chronicle of life, death, and the tragicomedy of humankind. In the beautiful, ridiculous, and tawdry story of the Buendía family, one sees all of humanity, just as in the history, myths, growth, and decay of Macondo, one sees all of Latin America.

    Greg says: "Outstanding Audiobook!"
    "SEVEN GENERATIONS"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    “One Hundred Years of Solitude” is a story about seven generations of one fictional family. The hope, fear, and experience of this family elicits feelings and opinions about life. History of the Buendia family focuses attention on social and economic evolution and revolution in Latin America. The story offers insight to all nations seeking independence and individual self-determination.

    The author, Gabriel Garcia Márquez, writes a complex story, melding the mythology and history of Latin America while tweaking the nose of imperialists; and savaging the lives of nationalists, idealists, and revolutionaries. Márquez creates a patriarch named José Arcadio Buendia that is a visionary with a perception of reality that mixes magical thinking with scientific reasoning to found a Colombian’ town called Macondo. The history of Macondo is the journey of all nations seeking independence and individual self-determination. However, “One Hundred Years of Solitude” infers the journey is foreordained rather than elicited by free choice.

    “One Hundred Years of Solitude” is widely acclaimed, written in many languages, and considered a classic. However, the story is too densely populated with characters to be appreciated in a first listen. John Lee offers a great narration of the story but patience and fortitude are required for the listener to complete the audio book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Revelations: Visions, Prophecy, and Politics in the Book of Revelation

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 27 mins)
    • By Elaine Pagels
    • Narrated By Lorna Raver
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (239)
    Performance
    (196)
    Story
    (195)

    Elaine Pagels explores the surprising history of the most controversial book of the Bible. In the waning days of the Roman Empire, militant Jews in Jerusalem had waged anall-out war against Rome’s occupation of Judea, and their defeat resulted in the desecration of the Great Temple in Jerusalem. In the aftermath of that war, John of Patmos, a Jewish prophet and follower of Jesus, wrote the Book of Revelation, prophesying God’s judgment on the pagan empire that devastated and dominated his people.

    Diane says: "Revealing "Revelations""
    "END TIMES"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Elaine Pagels is a Professor of Religion at Princeton University. One can draw different conclusions from Pagels’ history of religion but end times holds a high place in Pagels’ research and opinion about “Revelations”.

    “Revelations” is the second Elaine Pagels’ book reviewed in this blog. From her chosen profession and the previous quote, one presumes Ms. Pagels is a spiritual person but a review of her work seems to challenge bed-rock Catholic beliefs. The first review in this blog, “The Gnostic Gospels”, shows Catholic religion and its hierarchical organization as more man-made than divinely inspired. That sentiment is equally drawn from her history of “Revelations”; which is not to diminish Pagels’ spirituality but to infer that her scholarly histories of religion are interpretations of mankind’s divine belief rather than manifestations of a supreme being.

    Are Pagels’ books an endorsement of humanism or religion? One draws their own conclusion; however, her scholarly pursuit of religious’ history is, at the very least, fascinating and informative.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • America's Bitter Pill: Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix Our Broken Healthcare System

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 10 mins)
    • By Steven Brill
    • Narrated By Dan Woren
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (168)
    Performance
    (129)
    Story
    (131)

    America's Bitter Pill is Steven Brill's much-anticipated, sweeping narrative of how the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was written, how it is being implemented, and, most important, how it is changing - and failing to change - the rampant abuses in the healthcare industry. Brill probed the depths of our nation's healthcare crisis in his trailblazing Time magazine Special Report, which won the 2014 National Magazine Award for Public Interest.

    Andrew S. Breza says: "Great history, questionable solutions"
    "AN AMERICAN CITIZEN'S NIGHTMARE"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    “America’s Bitter Pill” is a policy wonk’s dream and an American citizen’s nightmare. It reveals the role of money and politics in American government. Steven Brill indicts a political process that seems freighted with more venal self-interest than good will. Brill overwhelms readers, which are not policy wonks, with disgusting political backroom deals and entrenched private and non-profit interests that affect the federal legislative process. The disgust comes from the distortion of the most important legislation passed by the American’ Federal Government since the New Deal.

    What Brill shows is that the value of high profits to private and non-profit insurance and medical facilities is more important than offering reasonably priced health care to the general public. What every special interest lobbied for in the Affordable Care Act depended on improving or maintaining profit. “America’s Bitter Pill”, the Affordable Care Act, is laced with greed. The Affordable Care Act has extended insurance to more people in the United States than ever before, but it continues to rankle knowledgeable Americans because it is based on the false belief that it will cure an incurable disease, human greed.

    An optimist chooses to believe America’s flawed legislative system will, in the long run, serve its public better than any other known form of government. The optimist believes the Affordable Care Act will be improved over time and will mitigate increased health care costs. The pessimist believes the Affordable Care Act is a boondoggle. The pessimist believes American government is accelerating its move toward tyranny. A realist suggests the Affordable Care Act is Democracy in action.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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