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Abbie

ratings
17
REVIEWS
17
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
1
HELPFUL VOTES
42

  • The Way We Live Now

    • UNABRIDGED (32 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Anthony Trollope
    • Narrated By Timothy West
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (362)
    Performance
    (197)
    Story
    (196)

    In this world of bribes, vendettas and swindling, in which heiresses are gambled and won, Trollope's characters embody all the vices: Lady Carbury is 'false from head to foot'; her son Felix has 'the instincts of a horse, not approaching the higher sympathies of a dog'; and Melmotte - the colossal figure who dominates the book - is a 'horrid, big, rich scoundrel... a bloated swindler... a vile city ruffian'.

    Nardia says: "Long, but well worth it."
    "Simply Supreme"
    Overall

    Anthony Trollope tells an intelligent and engaging story about plausible characters and Timothy West is one of my all-time favorite readers.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Northanger Abbey

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Jane Austen
    • Narrated By Anna Massey
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (9)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (5)

    Catherine Morland is the very ideal of a nice girl from a happy family, but she has an overactive imagination. She is also obsessed with Gothic novels, where terrible things happen to the heroine, which gets her into all sorts of trouble. When she meets funny, sharp Henry Tilney, she's instantly taken with him. But when she is invited to his home, the sinister Northanger Abbey, her preoccupation with fantasy starts to get in the way of reality.

    Abbie says: "Jane Austen and Anna Massey - unbeatable team"
    "Jane Austen and Anna Massey - unbeatable team"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Jane Austen takes us into a world almost 200 years gone by - before women's rights, universal suffrage, antibiotics, steam engines, trains, electricity, hot and cold running water, indoor plumbing, telephones, typewriters, movies, radio, or TV.

    What's there to interest us? - romance, gossip, lies, competition, manipulation, innuendoes, fairness, and honor.

    This is a story I can listen to over and over again. I love Anna Massey's peculiarly distinct pronounciation, which may not be for everybody.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Moby Dick

    • UNABRIDGED (24 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Herman Melville
    • Narrated By Duncan Carse
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (79)
    Performance
    (37)
    Story
    (37)

    Moby-Dick by Herman Melville is a classic of American and world literature. Written in 1851, this is the incredible story of the crazed captain Ahab who, consumed by his desire for revenge, drives his crew to scour the oceans of the world for the fearsome white whale, Moby Dick. It soon becomes clear that Ahab will stop at nothing and is prepared to risk everything, his ship, his crew members, and his own life. Herman Melville (1819 - 1891) was an American novelist short story writer, essayist and poet.

    JAY says: "THANK YOU..."
    "I Changed My Point of View"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I bought this version so I could contribute to the reviews. I grew up on Cape Cod, lived on Martha's Vineyard, and I presently live in New Bedford, so this is a very special story for me. I've listened to Moby Dick a number of times and seen both movies (the first one's better if you can get a copy). I agree with all the good things that have been said about the story, and said better than I could have.

    I had wanted to put in a good word for the narration, because in the mid-1800's American accents had not been homogenized by radio and TV and many people must have sounded like the British sound to Americans today. And Duncan Carse started out sounding well enough.

    But alas, he should have stayed away from accents altogether. Besides his attempt at early American, which would have been all right with me, his entire repertoire of other accents sound like Scotsmen, and that's enough to distract me from the enchantment of the tale.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime That Scandalized a City & Sparked the Tabloid Wars

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By Paul Collins
    • Narrated By William Dufris
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (993)
    Performance
    (817)
    Story
    (816)

    In Long Island, a farmer found a duck pond turned red with blood. On the Lower East Side, two boys playing at a pier discovered a floating human torso wrapped tightly in oilcloth. Blueberry pickers near Harlem stumbled upon neatly severed limbs in an overgrown ditch. Clues to a horrifying crime were turning up all over New York, but the police were baffled: There were no witnesses, no motives, no suspects. The grisly finds that began on the afternoon of June 26, 1897, plunged detectives headlong into the era's most perplexing murder.

    deborah says: "Great look at NYC crime, forensics, and journalism"
    "Dismal, Ghastly, and Inappropriately Read"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A depressing story read like the narrator was one of the newspaper reporters chasing every juicy detail. Read with relish for the lowest common denominator.

    Hard to follow - lots of street names and boroughs, many people and some with nicknames or aliases. Not easy without the text.

    The story of this terrible murder might have been gripping if the narrator had taken a serious attitude to it, but he seems to enjoy the horror as much as the thrill-happy public of the day.

    Not a book I'd listen to again and I hate spending money on one shot deals.

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Woman in White

    • UNABRIDGED (24 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Wilkie Collins
    • Narrated By Gabriel Woolf
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (130)
    Performance
    (40)
    Story
    (42)

    Late one night, a drawing teacher meets a mysterious woman dressed in white. Who is she, and what is her connection to the teacher's new pupil, a beautiful heiress? Serialized in 1859 - 1860, and first published in book form in 1860 it is still regarded still as one of the best plots in English literature. Told from multiple perspectives, the story is brought to life by its marvellous villains and complex, spirited and believable female characters.

    Joseph R says: "A Book which keeps one guessing --- wrong"
    "A treasure!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This story is way over and above The Moonstone, and anything by Dickens, Austen, or Trollope, for my money. It's rich with characters to love, admire, despise, pity, respect, and fear; but most of all, to grab your interest and hold it to the very end. These are characters to remember fondly and revisit often.

    Along with the usual romantic pair of star-crossed lovers, there's a loyal sister with courage and honor; one of the most disgustingly self-involved uncles ever spawned from an author's imagination; a mysterious woman who wafts in and out of the narration, getting more and more flesh on her as the story evolves; a wicked poser who steals the ... well you'll have to listen to find out what he steals; and one of my all time favorite characters, the hugely obese yet ever soft-treading, evil Count Fosco, who eats vast amounts of pastries, trains his wife, pet mice and birds to obey his voice commands, dances while singing Italian songs and playing the accordian, hammers away at the piano, mixes effective medicinals, reads others' mail, spies on the sisters, deceives, arranges complex and deadly plots, and manages to stay one step ahead of the protagonists. Yet Count Fosco falls in love.

    This is a book I've listened to at least 4 times, have burned to discs, and will listen to again and again, especially on stormy nights when the wind blows the rain against my windows.

    Some reviewers have criticized the narrator, Gabriel Woolf, for the added sound effects, but I was raised without a TV and was read to as a child, so throat clearing, page turning, gulping water, and taking deep breaths is just part of hearing a story read by another human being. Modern media has trained us expect air-brushed perfection from the world, but that only happens on the screen.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Cold, Cold Ground

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Adrian McKinty
    • Narrated By Gerard Doyle
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1295)
    Performance
    (1120)
    Story
    (1115)

    Adrian McKinty was born in Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland. He studied politics and philosophy at Oxford before moving to America in the early 1990s. Living first in Harlem, he found employment as a construction worker, barman, and bookstore clerk. In 2000 he moved to Denver to become a high school English teacher and it was there that he began writing fiction.

    Alan says: "What a stunning book"
    "Just Not My Idea of Great"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    If you're into explicit descriptions of violent death, you'll love this book. I'm not and I didn't. It's not the kind of book I'd listen to again and again.

    Although Adrian McKinty is truly an accomplished artist, in my opinion his talent is wasted on so much dreary violence. He writes as though there's nothing else for human beings to be interested in.

    He creates a lovable character in a gripping plot, but then surrounds him with horrible murders, at which we are also compelled to look, in all their ghastly details. The story seems to promise a psychological mystery involving a homophobic serial killer who leaves clues containing mythological allusions. But it rapidly becomes just another detective story in which we encounter the typical rookie cop (who is right, of course) getting busted, chewed out, and taken off the case by his superiors. Predictably, he goes about solving the case on his own at the risk of losing his job. A note to authors, editors, and agents: WE KNOW HOW THIS PLOT GOES, ALREADY!

    The fact that this author is one of Audible's listeners' most favorites is a sad statement about how much fictional evil we call good these days.

    I agree totally with every plaudit the previous listeners have given the narrator, Gerard Doyle. He's got many great voices with appropriate accents, perfect timing, and excellent tone. He reads as though he is the character and we're in the character's mind with him.



    10 of 12 people found this review helpful
  • The Impossible Dead

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Ian Rankin
    • Narrated By Peter Forbes
    Overall
    (69)
    Performance
    (55)
    Story
    (53)

    Malcolm Fox and his team are back. They've been sent to Fife to investigate whether fellow cops covered up for a corrupt colleague, Detective Paul Carter. Carter has been found guilty of misconduct with his own uncle, also in the force, having proved to be his nemesis. But what should be a simple job is soon complicated by intimations of conspiracy - and a brutal murder committed with a weapon that should not even exist.

    The spiralling investigation takes Fox back to 1985, a year of turmoil in British political life. Terrorists intent on a split between Scotland and the rest of the UK were becoming more ruthless, sending letter-bombs and poisonous spores to government offices, plotting kidnaps and murder, and trying to stay one step ahead of the spies sent to find them. Fox has a duty to get at the truth, while the body count rises, the clock starts ticking, and he fights for his professional and personal life.

    ch says: "Overall good story with some contrivance"
    "Excellent"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Interesting, engrossing, well written, intelligent, very likeable characters ~ no ghastly or gross descriptions of crimes. A refined cop story, if I may call it that. Well read - Peter Forbes is a master at different voices and accents. You know who's talking when he's reading. Well paced and natural.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Glitter Dome

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Joseph Wambaugh
    • Narrated By Adam Verner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (14)
    Performance
    (12)
    Story
    (11)

    In his finest, most compelling blend of wild humor and powerful drama, Joseph Wambaugh leads us into the Hollywood scene to demonstrate the effects of that heady, amoral world on four sets of police partners enmeshed in the glamour and the grime, the hustle and the horror. They live and work in a dizzying mix of moguls and starlets, elaborate parties, outrageous and sordid actions; a place where sex and drugs are open and the big deals are undercover.

    Abbie says: "Hollywood Hell"
    "Hollywood Hell"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    My problem is I like Joseph Wambaugh's Hollywood series and fell for what the publisher says about this book. It's a lie.

    Look not here for the likes of Hollywood Nate, Flotsam, Jetsam, or the Oracle. Unlike most of Wambaugh's other LAPD stories, there is no comic relief, not a hint of honor, and no endearing characters. Most are depressed, played out, addicted, divorced, degraded, case-hardened men (sorry, no women cops) that look forward to nothing so much as their own suicides. I began to wish they'd offed themselves before Wambaugh had sat down to write.

    This book is a tiresome reiteration of all the forms of immorality and crime that isolated, desperate, and ungodly people can manifest. Private problems of the most intimate types, including how to off yourself successfully with a gun, are described in minute detail. Continued isolation, booze, and loose women are offered again and again as the hoped for, but ever unsuccessful, redemption.

    Borrrrrrring. And depressing, if you can get through it, which I couldn't.

    In spite of these drawbacks, the narrator carries it well, No complaints about him.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Kennedy Detail: JFK's Secret Service Agents Break Their Silence

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Gerald Blaine, Lisa McCubbin
    • Narrated By Alan Sklar
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (430)
    Performance
    (266)
    Story
    (267)

    Even today, almost five decades after John F. Kennedy was slain, the public continues to be captivated by the "Kennedy Curse" and new theories about what really happened on that fateful day in 1963. For nearly 50 years former Secret Service agent Clint Hill has lived with the unimaginable guilt of losing a president on his watch and has obeyed an honor code of silence, refusing to contribute to any books about the assassination. Until now.

    Vidoloff says: "A must "read" in my opinion"
    "Five for the Secret Service ... but"
    Overall

    I have problems with the narrator. Alan Sklar's voice is as deep and rich as melted dark chocolate sauce, but I can't forgive him for calling Caroline (Kennedy) "Carolyn". I'm sorry, but obvious mistakes distract and annoy me til I lose the story in anticipation of the next blooper. If it's worth telling, writing about, and getting recorded, then it's worth BEING READ CORRECTLY. And mispronouncing the first name of one of the leading characters takes away from the whole story for me.

    Sklar needs to listen to some more Kennedy speeches before he attempts the accent again.

    Towards the end of the book there's enough emotion for any three Dickens novels. When tough guys get sentimental they can be downright maudlin, so no need for any exaggeration on the part of the narrator.

    That being said (or should I say "bemoaned"?), I have to add that this is a highly detailed and believable story of some of America's finest men in impossible situations where they're expected to jog in dress shoes and perform at 110% while being deprived of sleep, food, and family. And then they live in silent torment for not being perfect under impossible conditions.

    It's a wonder good people still serve in the Secret Service, because according to another book about the Service, conditions haven't improved overmuch,

    14 of 16 people found this review helpful
  • The Ghostly Rental

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 23 mins)
    • By Henry James
    • Narrated By Jim Killavey
    Overall
    (10)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (3)

    Henry James wrote many excellent ghost stories, his most famous being, The Turn of the Screw. In The Ghostly Rental a newcomer in town, who loves to walk for exercise, comes upon a deserted rural road. He follows the road and comes upon a house that immediately strikes him as "simply haunted." He is determined to get into the house and find out the truth about it. What he finds out turns out to be quite different than what he expected.

    Abbie says: "Narrator Brings Bland to a Whole New Level"
    "Narrator Brings Bland to a Whole New Level"
    Overall

    If there's suspense and horror in this tale, it's been methodically extracted by Jim Killavey, who plods through it without meaning or expression, pauses at inappropriate places, and drops his tone of voice at the end of every monotonous sentence, if not word. This could have been really spooky, but Killavey manages only to annoy and bore.

    2 of 14 people found this review helpful
  • Gone with the Wind

    • UNABRIDGED (49 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By Margaret Mitchell
    • Narrated By Linda Stephens
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3045)
    Performance
    (2010)
    Story
    (2044)

    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Literature, Margaret Mitchell's great novel of the South is one of the most popular books ever written. Within six months of its publication in 1936, Gone With the Wind had sold a million copies. To date, it has been translated into 25 languages, and more than 28 million copies have been sold. Here are the characters that have become symbols of passion and desire....

    dallas says: "not to miss audible experience"
    "Dare I give this huge favorite such a rating?"
    Overall

    Yes, I dare. An unrealistic picture of life on the ol' plantation with all the "servants" so very happy to be owned by their white folks. "Rhett Butler's People", "The Wind Done Gone", "A Light to My Path", "Huckleberry Finn", and "The Slaves' War" begin to describe reality for the men, women, and children who were owned, sold, traded, beaten, raped, and killed in the ante-bellum South. This was a terrible time for all the people in our country, except the few unscrupulous rascals who made millions selling shabby clothes, rotten food, defective guns, and sick horses to the armies. Bet you didn't know the South was the first to conscript soldiers. Right. They weren't all rarin' to kill some Yankees. So there's no need for Linda Stephens to over-dramatize her characterizations the way she does. She could read it in a dead pan voice and it would still come through as extremely, dramatically, terrible, because it was.

    1 of 9 people found this review helpful

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