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Aaron

107
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 152 reviews
  • 184 ratings
  • 568 titles in library
  • 93 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
54
FOLLOWERS
12

  • Rendezvous

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 2 mins)
    • By Nelson DeMille
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (290)
    Performance
    (251)
    Story
    (254)

    In this tense, riveting mind game, New York Times bestselling novelist Nelson DeMille delivers a suspenseful short story in the tradition of his classic military novels The General's Daughter and Word of Honor. A band of soldiers in its last month of service in Vietnam goes out on a patrol through enemy territory with a female sniper in its path. Recounting the mission in shattering and sometimes gruesome detail, DeMille creates a concise masterpiece of moody suspense.

    karen says: "Fabulous -- and a puzzler"
    "OK Short."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This was a short novel, that was atmospheric and well-written, but perhaps lacking in depth.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Cop Hater: 87th Precinct Series, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By Ed McBain
    • Narrated By Dick Hill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (145)
    Performance
    (127)
    Story
    (127)

    When a sniper begins gunning down cops from the 87th Precinct in cold blood, it’s up to Detective Steve Carella to solve the case. With three cops already dead, Carella delves into the city’s underworld to search for the killer.

    PAR-TEE says: "1950's Noir..."
    "50's Cop Novel"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The first book "Cop Killer" was set against a heatwave in the middle of Summer.

    The second book "The Mugger" takes place in Fall (Autumn).

    I happened to read both books during the seasons they were written about. I was impressed with McBain's atmospheric writing, perhaps because I experienced the seasons as he was describing them.

    McBain describes the city as if it were a woman (his words) and the reader can thus feel the dress sticking to her skin; Whether it is the sweltering summer sweat, or leaves falling around her ankles onto wet pavement.

    Once the mood is set, the actors are introduced: the criminals and the crimes they perpetrate, the enforcers of peace, and the families at home.


    “The body lay outside an abandoned, boarded-up theater. The theater had started as a first-run movie house, many years back when the neighborhood had still been fashionable. As the neighborhood began rotting, the theater began showing second-run films, and then old movies, and finally foreign-language films.”
    - Ed Mccain from "Cop Hater"




    By todays standards Mccain's writing may seem quaint, but it captures the essence of 1950's cop novels.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Mugger

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Ed McBain
    • Narrated By Dick Hill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (45)
    Performance
    (41)
    Story
    (39)

    A beat cop winds up on the trail of a deadly mugger, but when it suddenly gets personal, his own life might be the next thing to be snatched….

    Aaron says: "50's Cop Series"
    "50's Cop Series"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The first book "Cop Killer" was set against a heatwave in the middle of summer.

    The second book "The Mugger" takes place in Fall (Autumn).

    It was a coincidence that I happened to read both books during the seasons that they were written about. I was impressed with Mccains atmospheric writing, perhaps because I experienced the seasons as he described them. He was able to capture a feeling of the city, in part because of the different seasons.

    McBain describes the city as if it were a woman (his words) and the reader can thus feel the dress sticking to her skin; Whether it is the sweltering summer sweat, or leaves falling around her ankles onto wet pavement.

    Once the mood is set, the actors are introduced: the criminals and the crimes they perpetrate, the enforcers of peace, and the families at home.

    "You know her tossed head in the auburn crowns of molting autumn foliage, Riverhead, and the park. […] You have seen her naked streets, have heard the sullen murmur of the wind in the concrete canyons of Isola, have watched her come awake, alive. […] She is big and sprawling and dirty sometimes, and sometimes she shrieks in pain, and sometimes she moans in ecstasy.
    But she could be nothing but a woman, and that’s good because your business is women.
    You are a mugger."
    - Ed Mccain from "The Mugger"




    By todays standards Mccain's writing may seem quaint, but it captures the essence of 1950's cop novels.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Martian

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By Andy Weir
    • Narrated By R. C. Bray
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (10296)
    Performance
    (9795)
    Story
    (9815)

    Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars. Now, he's sure he'll be the first person to die there. After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth that he’s alive—and even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone long before a rescue could arrive. Chances are, though, he won't have time to starve to death. The damaged machinery, unforgiving environment, or plain old "human error" are much more likely to kill him first. But Mark isn't ready to give up yet. Drawing on his ingenuity, his engineering skills—and a relentless, dogged refusal to quit—he steadfastly confronts one seemingly insurmountable obstacle after the next. Will his resourcefulness be enough to overcome the impossible odds against him?"

    Brian says: "Duct tape is magic and should be worshiped"
    "Just like the Movie!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Okay, so the movie hasn't come out yet, but still...it reads just like the movie.

    If you enjoy survival fiction and/or light sic-fi this is it!

    An astronaut is accidentally stranded on Mars (thought dead), but survives in the hopes of being rescued by the next Mars Mission. He currently has enough supplies for 6 people to last hopefully long enough that NASA might figure out he is still alive, or until the next Mars Mission arrives in a few years.

    The "techno babble" is believable enough. I enjoyed the story without wondering if it could actually happen. (e.g.., he has seeds and soil -and of course manure, runs on solar, has an oxygen and water reclaimer, etc...)

    Weir does a good job of creating difficult situations for the main character to overcome, and keeps the reader involved. The main character enlightens tense situations with humor (though funnies if you appreciate sarcasm and the occassional fart joke).

    I am curious to know how Hollywood will cut this book down to 2 hours, as there is quite a lot of book to cram into a short movie. It will be an interesting comparison, and promises to leave enough variety to allow the Book and Movie to stand alone (together).

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Immortality

    • UNABRIDGED (26 hrs and 33 mins)
    • By Kevin Bohacz
    • Narrated By Kevin T. Collins
    Overall
    (21)
    Performance
    (19)
    Story
    (19)

    Without warning, something has gone terribly awry. In the remote and unnoticed places of the world, small pockets of death begin occurring. As the initially isolated extinctions spread, the world's eyes focus on this unimaginable horror and chaos. Out of the ecological imbalance, something new and extraordinary is evolving and surviving to fill the voids left by these extinctions. Evolution is operating in ways no one could have expected, and environmental damage may be the catalyst.

    John S says: "Good End of World Thriller"
    "Unbelievable"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I appreciate the effort, but it smacked of a sophomoric effort. The story was slow to warm up, and when it did, I was't sure if it was geared for Science/Thriller fans, or PA fans, but suspect that neither will be truly happy.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Hamlet, Prince of Denmark: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By A. J. Hartley, David Hewson
    • Narrated By Richard Armitage
    Overall
    (518)
    Performance
    (490)
    Story
    (486)

    It is a tale of ghosts, of madness, of revenge - of old alliances giving way to new intrigues. Denmark is changing, shaking off its medieval past. War with Norway is on the horizon. And Hamlet - son of the old king, nephew of the new - becomes increasingly entangled in a web of deception - and murder. Beautifully performed by actor Richard Armitage ("Thorin Oakenshield" in the Hobbit films), Hamlet, Prince of Denmark takes Shakespeare’s original into unexpected realms, reinventing a story we thought we knew.

    Madeleine says: "The Devil's In the Details"
    "If Shakespeare wrote novels, this would be it."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Every bit as serious as the original.

    Hartley and Hewson have created a modern rendition of Hamlet that is eloquent and faithful to the original, albeit with a more novel feel.

    Richard Ermitage was the perfect reader for Hamlet (I laughed, I cried, I despised).

    Highly recommended to people who want to read Shakespeare, without the play format.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Who Goes There?: The Novella That Formed the Basis of 'THE THING'

    • UNABRIDGED (2 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By John W. Campbell
    • Narrated By Steve Cooper
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (416)
    Performance
    (342)
    Story
    (347)

    Who Goes There?, the novella that formed the basis of the film The Thing, is the John W. Campbell classic about an antarctic research camp that discovers and thaws the ancient body of a crash-landed alien.

    Joel D Offenberg says: "An Absolute Classic!"
    "Short Sci-Fi Gem"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    If you have a couple hours to kill and are looking for a taut thriller, try this one.
    It is an arctic chiller. It is tightly woven, and wraps-up nicely. Slightly dated, but on the polar ice-cap, trust me, no one cares.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Cuckoo's Calling

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By Robert Galbraith
    • Narrated By Robert Glenister
    Overall
    (7410)
    Performance
    (6736)
    Story
    (6749)

    After losing his leg to a land mine in Afghanistan, Cormoran Strike is barely scraping by as a private investigator. Then John Bristow walks through his door with an amazing story: his sister, the legendary supermodel Lula Landry, famously fell to her death a few months earlier. The police ruled it a suicide, but John refuses to believe that. The case plunges Strike into the world of multimillionaire beauties, rock-star boyfriends, and desperate designers, and it introduces him to every variety of pleasure, enticement, seduction, and delusion known to man.

    Tracey says: "Unbelievable debut mystery set in London"
    "Excellent Crime Fiction"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Crime Noir makes a re-appearance.
    Hard Boiled detective (named Harry?) no, Cormoran Strike, is a down-on-his-luck, but good-at-his-job Private Dick. The story starts exactly at the right time, and moves at a steady clip, with fine writing, and atmosphere.

    Its just the kind of detective story we all want to hear, but the current lot of hack writers seems incapable of writing.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Bourne Identity

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 18 mins)
    • By Robert Ludlum
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1174)
    Performance
    (807)
    Story
    (803)

    His memory is blank. He only knows that he was flushed out of the Mediterranean Sea, his body riddled with bullets. There are a few clues. A frame of microfilm surgically implanted beneath the flesh of his hip. Evidence that plastic surgery has altered his face. Strange things that he says in his delirium -- maybe code words. Initials: "J.B." And a number on the film negative that leads to a Swiss bank account, a fortune of four million dollars, and, at last, a name: Jason Bourne.

    P. Shuart says: "Robert Ludlum's Attention to Detail A++"
    "The Movie is much better"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story


    Why is this writer famous? I suspect it is because the movie made him look very good.
    If you liked the movie, stop there. Save your time and money. Seriously.

    The book was long and boring. But the love story was the worst! I sighed 'audibly' whenever the main character and the leading-lady (who was kidnapped by the main character) gushed how much they loved each other. They found a deep and sincere love (between two people who just met, and one of them has no idea who he is). Really, it's exactly that ridiculous.

    And Bourne's mysterious background...It isn't nearly as interesting as the movie, mostly because it takes about 15 hours to get to the crux of the matter. That part might have been more interesting if I had not already seen the movie! But, as I said, I saw the movie.

    Narration was Scott Brick. Did not help much.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Paradise Lost

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By John Milton
    • Narrated By Anton Lesser
    Overall
    (182)
    Performance
    (62)
    Story
    (65)

    In words remarkable for their richness of rhythm and imagery, Milton tells the story of man's creation, fall, and redemption, "to justify the ways of God to men". Here, unabridged, and told with exceptional sensitivity and power by Anton Lesser, is the plight of Adam and Eve, the ambition and vengefulness of Satan and his cohorts.

    David says: "Great Epic Poem Narrated Well"
    "Rewarding, but not for the faint-of-heart!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Have you ever read the Book of Job?
    In the Book of Job, Lucifer approaches God and tells him that he has been to and fro across the entire world, and basically states that everyone in the world is a sinner and deserves to go to hell (paraphrase).

    God replies by asking Lucifer if he has seen his servant Job. Satan responds that Job is only good, because of all the good things God has blessed him with. "take away all those good things, and Job will curse God". And thus begins the memorable story of Job's testing by Satan, God's protection, and the ultimate blessing on Job for his faith in God.

    In Job, the reader is given a rare glimpse into some Heavenly workings, such as: what the armies of Heaven can be like, the Throne Room of God, Temptation from spiritual forces, and how God responds to rebel angels, and etc...

    Milton, in his book Paradise Lost, has taken the same approach in story-telling to show how Satan led one-third of the angels of Heaven in an attempt to usurp the throne of God for their own glory, God's reprisal, and later how the Fallen sought to disrupt God's creation(s).

    Although published in 1667, 'Paradise Lost' carries the power of religious truth that is still relevant today. The language, however, can present problems for modern ears. Milton seems to especially love to use words like: adamantine, obdurate, importune, and etc... Milton was obviously creating high-poetry on par with his subject, though sometimes it can feel almost too lofty to be attainable. The imagery, if patient, can be striking and profound, when Milton's voice is not so present.

    Anton Lesser does a fine job of speaking life into the words without seeming artificial (though occasionally it can take on the tone of a Shakesperian play).

    I would recommend this as an important listen, if you are in the right state of mind for such epic imagery (and sometimes tiring vocabulary).

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • We Are All Weird: The Myth of Mass and the End of Compliance

    • UNABRIDGED (2 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By Seth Godin
    • Narrated By Seth Godin
    Overall
    (218)
    Performance
    (182)
    Story
    (186)

    We Are All Weird is a celebration of choice, of treating different people differently and of embracing the notion that everyone deserves the dignity and respect that comes from being heard. The book calls for end of "mass" and for the beginning of offering people more choices, more interests, and giving them more authority to operate in ways that reflect their own unique values.

    Steven says: "Nothing new"
    "Ignore the Title"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Seth Godin brings insight into the dilemma that modern Marketing is confronting. It may sound uninteresting, but it is fascinating to see the inner workings of such a subtle, and sometime subliminal profession.

    What is it? How it is changing? and, How it is changing us? How does the Internet and Globalism affect how we perceive wealth, and purchase things? These are some of the questions Godin explores.

    The book is really about 'how marketing affects our daily lives. It is about the way we see ourselves, and about how we want others to see us, and how often this is influenced by advertising'. It is about how the Internet and Globalism have created niche markets, rather than the "mass" markets that we have grown up with (for example: the major syndicates nbc, abc, cbs used to dominate the airwaves, now we have thousands of channels to chose from... and not one that everyone will talk about at the water-cooler the next day, except perhaps the Superbowl). This change, makes it hard for marketers, to know how to reach a growing and ever-differing modern audience.

    There are moments of brilliance, but I think overall, Godin makes a critical mistake by using the word "weird". Marketing by definition is: " the process of communicating the value of a product or service to customers, for the purpose of selling that product or service.".

    By using the word "weird' so often, Godin makes it hard for the listener to embrace his arguments, which are often worth listening to. Godin could have used a word such as "unique" or "a-typical" to describe groups outside of the "norm". Instead he essentially calls us to embrace being "weird" and completely ignores the stigma that might prevent people from doing so. I mostly agree with his thesis, and think he brings forth many good points in a short, easy to listen-to book.

    * another minor gripe I have is when Godin introduces his political leanings. Although you can guess what they might be, you will see that they add nothing to the content of this book. I chose to ignore them altogether for the sake of the hearing his thoughts about marketing and the changing audiences.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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