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John

Omaha, NE, USA | Member Since 2008

15
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 1 reviews
  • 3 ratings
  • 23 titles in library
  • 1 purchased in 2014
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  • Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Neil deGrasse Tyson
    • Narrated By Dion Graham
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2028)
    Performance
    (1205)
    Story
    (1210)

    Neil deGrasse Tyson has a talent for guiding readers through the mysteries of outer space with stunning clarity and almost childlike enthusiasm. This collection of his essays from Natural History magazine explores a myriad of cosmic topics. Tyson introduces us to the physics of black holes by explaining what would happen to our bodies if we fell into one; he also examines the needless friction between science and religion, and notes Earth's status as "an insignificantly small speck in the cosmos".

    Lind says: "Well written and well read"
    "Text 5, Narration 1"
    Overall

    My star rating is an average of individual ratings for the author and the narrator. Taken for what it is, an anthology of essays, this book gives a good overview of many topics in astrophysics and science in general. As others have noted, if you are familiar with the current state of affairs, there will be little new to you. Tyson is clearly the heir apparent to Carl Sagan as popularizer of science. Someone should have provided the narrator with a pronunciation guide, though. To say that he pronounced non-English names and titles in a sometimes "non-standard" way would be charitable. The thing that set my nerves on edge the most was everytime he referred to the Apollo launch vehicle, the venerable "Saturn V", as the "Saturn Vee", not realizing that the "V" was a Roman numeral and the rocket was called the "Saturn 5". I never got the feeling the reader really understood what he was talking about and, therefore, all the excitement and emotion of Tyson's words came out as flat and forced. Too bad.


    15 of 20 people found this review helpful

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