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Gash

I'm retired and having fun watching birds, playing pennywhistle, cooking great meals, reading and listening to books. Ahhh... life is good!

ratings
91
REVIEWS
29
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
3
HELPFUL VOTES
30

  • False Colours

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 57 mins)
    • By Georgette Heyer
    • Narrated By Phyllida Nash
    Overall
    (178)
    Performance
    (159)
    Story
    (160)

    The honourable Christopher Fancot, on leave from the Diplomatic Service in the summer of 1817, is startled to find his entrancing but incorrigibly extravagant mother on the brink of financial and social ruin - and more than alarmed that his identical twin, Evelyn, Earl of Denville, has disappeared without trace. Christopher, or Kit, the respectable brother, is forced into an outrageous masquerade by his wayward family's tangled affairs. But in the face of Evelyn's continued absence, even Kit's ingenuity is stretched to the limit.

    Carol says: "Wow! A great listen!"
    "A rather Woodhouseian Heyer and a great reader!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Phyllida Nash is my favorite reader for Georgette Heyer books. Heyer builds her stories with sparkling dialog, and Nash is spot on with all voices. As with many Heyer book's this one relies on situational comedy, and Nash has unfailingly perfect timing in her reading that makes the most of the comedy. I had read this book in print, and I will say that Nash's performance makes it even better.

    As the story unfolds, I was reminded of Shakespeare's comedies and some Wooster/Jeeves misunderstandings, but even when Heyer's characters are silly, she draws them with so much affection, they don't come off as completely ridiculous.

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  • Cousin Kate

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Georgette Heyer
    • Narrated By Jilly Bond
    Overall
    (20)
    Performance
    (20)
    Story
    (20)

    When young and beautiful governess Kate Malvern finds herself unemployed, she is taken in by Minerva Broome, the aunt she has never met, and whisked away to the majestic country home of Staplewood. However, things are not as they seem: strange things start to happen in the manor and Staplewood soon turns from an inviting stately house to a cold and gloomy mansion with a dreadful secret!

    NoNamePlease says: "Demand Jilly Bond to do more Georgette Heyers work"
    "Heyer's attempt at gothic horror romance."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Not the usual Heyer. A sad tale and a bit tedious, but Jilly Bond's performance is wonderful.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Claire DeWitt and the City of the Dead

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Sara Gran
    • Narrated By Carol Monda
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (378)
    Performance
    (321)
    Story
    (319)

    Claire DeWitt is not your average private investigator. She has brilliant skills of deduction and is an ace at discovering evidence. But Claire also uses her dreams, omens, and mind-expanding herbs to help her solve mysteries, and relies on Détection—the only book published by the great and mysterious French detective Jacques Silette before his death.

    A. D. Mcrae says: "Mostly Disappointed but it was Quick"
    "Bleak investigation in post-Katrina wasteland"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    "No happy ending" is said over and over again throughout this book, but there is a little: some redemption, a bit of clarity, a couple of rescues, and even hope for the future.

    But there's too much desolation and ubiquitous drug and alcohol use for me, so I probably won't read the subsequent books. Sara Gran obviously loves her deeply flawed characters. The affection with which she portrays them helps ameliorate their barren circumstances and bleak outlook, and Carol Monda's reading does much to humanize all the characters. A lot of the dialog is in the vernacular and Monda's pacing speaks beautifully for each of the voices. For me, the most moving thing about the book was the picture pieced together of post-Katrina New Orleans and the survivors.

    Claire DeWitt is a tough character to like, though by the end of the book I found her more sympathetic. The constant drug and alcohol use in the book prevented me from seeing her as the brilliant intuitive detective that I believe is Gran's intention. I'm a recovering alcoholic, so I'll never be able to view any chronic excessive drug user as a brilliant mind, nor do I see it as palliative for heart-sick or wounded souls. I thought Gran's use of drug induced visions and dreams to provide essential clues for DeWitt to follow was just a facile and lazy way to propel the story forward.

    Also I found Gran's metaphysics more annoying than illuminating. Her mysticism when writing about the nature of 'mystery' felt overdone. The idea that a book about detection is a "code for a secret plan" that is a "channeled message" was too fanciful in the otherwise gritty story. I thought the metaphysical treatment actually trivialized the wisdom in the various quotes from Silette's book.

    If you like bleak environments, troubled protagonists, and murky detection, you may enjoy this book. It does have a lot to say about the city of New Orleans and The Storm.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Modern Witch: A Modern Witch, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Debora Geary
    • Narrated By Martha Harmon Pardee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (896)
    Performance
    (811)
    Story
    (831)

    Lauren is downtown Chicago's youngest elite realtor. She's also a witch. She must be - the fetching spell for Witches' Chat isn't supposed to make mistakes. So says the woman who coded the spell, at least. The tall, dark, and handsome guy sent to assess her is a witch too (and no, that doesn't end the way you might think). What he finds in Lauren will change lives, mess with a perfectly good career, and require lots of ice cream therapy.

    ShySusan says: "Perfect antidote for vampire & zombie overdoses"
    "Magic without charm, mystery, or whimsey."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is an odd academic sort of book, but without any history or facts - just one author's primer on what she imagines the craft of witches might be like: the types and sources of magical power, the means of identifying abilities, the heredity (or not) of power, and the training of the craft that shapes the magic. It isn't a magical world, just a world in which magic exists in witches. There's no wonder or whimsey, not much of a plot-line, no mystery, no danger, and everyone in the book is really (really) nice. They are too nice to be multi-dimensional people, but not exactly the Stepford Wives either - just simplistic. Even all the kids are so well behaved that I expect it must take a magic village to raise children without any dysfunction or rebellion. The little bit of romance is referred to but never actually felt. No emotions clutter up this book.

    I spent the entire book coasting through the pleasantries waiting for something to actually happen. Since one of the repeated admonitions in the book is: "An untrained witch is a dangerous witch" one would expect at least a blip along the smooth flat-line of the story.

    It seems unfair to rate Pardee's reading abilities with this book, but I expect it is her reading that accounts for anything that enlivens the story. Her skill is probably most evident in the fact that the characters were identifiable from each other, even though it must difficult to distinguish characters when they are uniformly undemonstrative.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Shadow of Night

    • UNABRIDGED (24 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Deborah Harkness
    • Narrated By Jennifer Ikeda
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (6082)
    Performance
    (5466)
    Story
    (5461)

    Now, picking up from A Discovery of Witches' cliff-hanger ending, Shadow of Night plunges Diana Bishop and Matthew Clairmont into Elizabethan London, a world of spies, subterfuge, and a coterie of Matthew's old friends, the mysterious School of Night that includes Christopher Marlowe and Walter Raleigh. Here, Diana must locate a witch to tutor her in magic, Matthew is forced to confront a past he thought he had put to rest, and the mystery of Ashmole 782 deepens. Deborah Harkness has crafted a gripping journey through a world of alchemy, time travel, and magical discoveries.

    Hallie says: "Even better than A Discovery of Witches"
    "Fantasy Historical Romance with genetics, Book 2"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I enjoyed this book as much as the first in the series. I loved the detail about Elizabethan England, found the additional characters specific to this book engaging, and thought the magic more compelling in this non-modern setting. However, I do think the book would have benefited from a bit of editing. But Jennifer Ikeda's excellent performance as the reader of this trilogy easily carried me past any knots slowing the flow of the story.

    I found it interesting that the primary female character, Diana Bishop, comes into her own in this environment where women had far less freedom than modern women have, while the primary male character, Matthew Clairmont, had some regression issues to deal with as he resumed a previously held role in the world. And of course, time-travel allows us to meet long dead fathers, both of whom are quite wonderful in different ways.

    I like the way Harkness handled the implications of time travel, especially the glimpses she provides of the modern day family tracking Diana and Matthew through a spattering of anomalous artifacts showing up in the modern world.

    All-in-all I thought it a good 'middle book' and eagerly await the last book in the All Souls trilogy.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Discovery of Witches

    • UNABRIDGED (24 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Deborah Harkness
    • Narrated By Jennifer Ikeda
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (9808)
    Performance
    (7293)
    Story
    (7332)

    Deep in the stacks of Oxford's Bodleian Library, young scholar Diana Bishop unwittingly calls up a bewitched alchemical manuscript in the course of her research. Descended from an old and distinguished line of witches, Diana wants nothing to do with sorcery; so after a furtive glance and a few notes, she banishes the book to the stacks. But her discovery sets a fantastical underworld stirring, and a horde of daemons, witches, and vampires soon descends upon the library.

    haesel says: "Where was this woman's editor?"
    "Genetics meets Fantasy Romance, Book 1"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Having read the other reviews, I have to say 1) yes this is primarily romantic fiction, 2) yes it is a sort of "Twilight" for adults since it is pg-13 and not a true 'bodice ripper' type of romance, and 3) yes the first book is a set up for the rest of the series so there is no completed mystery in this book. Yet I found it entertaining, have read both books in the series, and am eagerly awaiting the third on my pre-order list to see how she pulls everything together. I only hope Harkness's complete vision is as interesting as her set-up has promised.

    I like her characters and there is enough 'action' and mystery in the story to keep it moving and engaging. But then I am a Romance reader, love vampire fiction, and find the addition of genetics interesting. The reader is quite good, which is critically important to my enjoyment of an audio book. If a reader is poor, I'll continue any series I start in print rather than listen to a poor reader.

    If you are strictly a sci-fi/fantasy reader, skip this series. It will frustrate you. If you like historical romance, continue on - the next book takes you to Elizabethan England.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Dead Witch Walking

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Kim Harrison
    • Narrated By Marguerite Gavin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3052)
    Performance
    (2132)
    Story
    (2136)

    Rachel Morgan is a runner with the Inderland Runner Services, apprehending law-breakers throughout Cincinnati. She's also a witch, one of the many Inderlanders who revealed themselves after a genetically engineered virus wiped out 50 percent of humanity. Witches, warlocks, vampires, werewolves: the creatures of dreams and nightmares have lived beside humans for centuries, hiding their powers. But now they've stopped hiding, and nothing will be the same.

    Patti says: "wildly entertaining"
    "Welcome to the Hollows. Strap in for the ride!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This series is my favorite fantasy series, and this is the first book in the series. I first read it in print, now I'm listening to it in audible format. A great premise, completely engaging characters, snappy dialog, mystery, danger, and a great reader. What's not to like!?! And the witch Rachel Morgan (like my favorite wizard, Harry Dresden) has that wonderful trait: a very good heart, so trying to do the right thing in impossible situations always sinks her deeper and deeper in trouble.

    The series is a total of 13 books, the last of which is to be released in September of this year, plus one book of short stories. Those of us who want to move into the Hollows eagerly await the final installment, but we will be sorry to see it end.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Good Thief's Guide to Paris: A Mystery

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Chris Ewan
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (125)
    Performance
    (112)
    Story
    (112)

    Charlie Howard - globe-trotting mystery writer, professional thief, and poor decision maker - is in Paris. Flush with the success of his latest book reading, Charlie agrees to show a complete novice how to break into an apartment in the Marais. Fast-forward twenty-four hours and Charlie's hired to steal an ordinary-looking oil painting - from the exact same address. Mere coincidence? Charlie figures there's no harm in finding out - until a dead body turns up in his living room and he finds himself evading the law while becoming caught up in a quite outrageous heist.

    Janels says: "Entertaining, witty, AND a good mystery!"
    "Where are the editors?!?!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was fairly entertained by the first book in the series: A Good Thief's Guide to Amsterdam. It was fun largely because of meeting a new engaging character, and Simon Vance's reading carries the story. But it was also mostly forgettable, so I'm glad I got it on sale.

    This book on the other hand is memorable, but not because the story is compelling. This one is memorable because of the glaring grammatical errors and odd sentence structure throughout the book. There were so many errors in verb conjugation, I looked the author up to see if the books were written in another language and simply translated poorly. I did find several reviews in which the reviewer not only commented on the grammar but also, having read the book in print, commented on problems with punctuation and spelling.

    Simon Vance certainly had a challenge with this production. It must have driven him crazy to perform this book without correcting the grammar along the way. But he performed with his usual panache and made the book endurable enough that I actually did finish listening to it.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Hanover Square Affair: Captain Lacey Regency Mysteries

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Ashley Gardner, Jennifer Ashley
    • Narrated By James Gillies
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (28)
    Performance
    (27)
    Story
    (27)

    Cavalry captain Gabriel Lacey returns to Regency London from the Napoleonic wars, burned out, fighting melancholia, his career ended. His interest is piqued when he learns of a missing girl, possibly kidnapped by a prominent member of Parliament. Lacey's search for the girl leads to the discovery of murder, corruption, and dealings with a leader of the underworld.

    Gash says: "Another damaged but honorable man solving crimes"
    "Another damaged but honorable man solving crimes"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is the first in an ongoing series of Regency mysteries with very engaging characters and enough period detail to put you in the era. I've read all the books in the series in print, so I was eager to hear how the reader brought it all to life. James Gillies does a good job of rendering both Captain Lacy and the overall tenor of the story.

    Captain Lacy is a compelling personality and each book in the series provides a particular mystery that he endeavors to solve while it also reveals a bit more about the man and his past. There is a complexity to the community in which he lives and investigates, the seeds of which can be found in this first book. There are various side characters from all walks of life with whom Lacy develops a relationship and they develop gradually over the course of the books, so that we meet and learn more about a full compliment of characters over time.

    I highly recommend this series and hope Audible acquires the rest of the books as they become available.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Foundling

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Georgette Heyer
    • Narrated By Phyllida Nash
    Overall
    (119)
    Performance
    (93)
    Story
    (96)

    The shy young Duke of Sale has never known his parents. Instead, his Grace Adolphus Gillespie Vernon Ware or Gilly for short has endured 24 years of rigorous mollycoddling from his uncle and his valet. But his natural diffidence conceals a rebellious spirit. So when Gilly hears of Belinda, the beautiful foundling who appears to be blackmailing his cousin, he absconds with glee. Only he has no sooner entered his new and dangerous world than he is plunged into a frenzy of intrigue, kidnap and adventure.

    Amanda says: "Rollicking Adventure"
    "Excellent fun!!!!!!!!!!!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    One of my very favorite recordings of a Heyer book! The central characters are sweet and capable, the many side characters are totally engaging, their dialog is sharp, and the situations they face become more and more knotted until all unravels completely in a delightful ending. Great fun, and Phyllida Nash is simply the best reader of Heyer books there is.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Dancing on the Wind: The Regency Series, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By M. C. Beaton
    • Narrated By Lizzie Stanton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (12)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    I am going to die, Polly thought. The crowd clamored for a speech. Polly raised her hands, and they fell silent. From the foot of the gallows, she asked the spectators why she, a poor woman, should hang for theft, while the abbess of Covent Garden can commit murder on the souls of innocent country girls over and over again and yet go free - and then she condemned them to hell.

    Gash says: "A Dickensian tale with a strong female character."
    "A Dickensian tale with a strong female character."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Chesney (Beaton) doesn't write typical regency romantic fluff. Her characters are usually harder, more self-centered, and less sympathetic than found in other books of the genre, and she often exposes the realities of a world in which women had little-to-no power. Nor does she romanticize the period: her books provide many details about the less attractive characteristics of an era plagued by serious class discrepancy, unrelieved poverty, unchecked crime, universally poor hygiene, and ridiculous fashions and practices among the wealthy.

    Like a Dickens novel, this particular story is full of intrigue, plots, counter-plots, pitfalls, scrapes and escapes; and the many historical details bring the period vividly to life as the story unfolds. The book has the strongest central character I've found in a Chesney book so far - a young woman who manages to take care of herself through a combination of physical strength, native cunning, a sensible brain, a kind heart, and the ability to take life as it comes. I think this is my favorite Chesney book outside of her Traveling Matchmaker series (which is a bit "fluffier" than this story).

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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