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Karen

Likes: Cozy mysteries, esp w/cats, books on workings of the brain/autism, not-too-dark fantasy. Dislikes: Animal cruelty, torture scenes.

Glen Gardner, NJ, United States | Member Since 2008

48
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 99 reviews
  • 99 ratings
  • 281 titles in library
  • 29 purchased in 2014
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FOLLOWERS
5

  • The Prophet of Yonwood

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Jeanne DuPrau
    • Narrated By Becky Ann Baker
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (122)
    Performance
    (62)
    Story
    (66)

    It's 50 years before the settlement of the city of Ember and the world is in crisis. War looms on the horizon as 11-year-old Nickie and her aunt travel to the small town of Yonwood, North Carolina. There, one of the town's respected citizens has had a terrible vision of fire and destruction. Her garbled words are taken as prophetic instruction on how to avoid the coming disaster. If only they can be interpreted correctly.

    Kaui says: "Very imaginative prequel to the City of Ember"
    "A small story and a Prequel"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

    In this series I like book 1 best, book 2 second, then this book third. I have not yet read book 4. I preferred book 2 for the simple reason that it was closer to the story that so captivated me in the first book. Book 4 will go back not only to Lina and Doon but to Ember itself. So I am glad to have read this if for no other reason than to be ready to finish out the story.
    I liked the book well enough. Though, I was misunderstanding the scope of this work. I have in my head at the beginning of a book an idea of what the story will encompass. I was wrong here. The scope is smaller than I envisioned. Less happens overall and what happens is less relevant overall to the whole. Some people have complained that the connection was too tenuous to the series and only became clear towards the very end, or that it wasn't strong enough to warrant inclusion. I can understand those complaints, and even having read those complaints I still expected a more concrete connection to Lina and Doon and Ember. However, I was satisfied with the connection when it did come, and was actually proud of myself for figuring out ahead of being told exactly what the connection was.
    Reviews I read basically said a limited number of things. Most negative reviews were just annoyed it didn't continue the adventures of Lina and Doon. I am not sure why nobody seems to have known this beforehand? Of course we get back to them in book 4 so I don't think that's such a big deal. Some people object to prequels coming in the middle of a series and others (with whom I DO agree) complain there was a more interesting prequel that could have been written but that didn't make me hate this book. I sort of wonder why DuPrau did portray religious fervor so negatively - she had to know that makes people mad especially in a kids book, and I didn't get the vibe that she was really a religion hater.
    As often occurs in kids books the adults tend to be useless - which enables kids to drive the action. Particularly the adults of Nickie's family seem to be failing. I felt rather sorry for her. A little girl who needed more attention, in a confusing time and place.
    All in all I am satisfied with the book despite some flaws.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Ten Years Later

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 23 mins)
    • By Hoda Kotb
    • Narrated By Hoda Kotb
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (49)
    Performance
    (41)
    Story
    (41)

    Through years of perseverance, purpose, and passion, Hoda Kotb landed a spot with Kathie Lee on the Today show, won numerous journalism awards, and gained valuable life lessons. Now, after captivating audiences in her blockbuster memoir Hoda, she turns to stories about others who have undergone personal transformation against great odds. In Ten Years Later, Hoda chronicles six amazing stories by identifying a game-changing event in her subjects’ lives and then revisiting those lives a decade later.

    kris says: "Hoda Hits it Out of the Park!"
    "Stories were interesting BUT"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book is Hota telling of her interviews with 6 people. I found the stories interesting. However, I did not really get how the stories really belong together. Even the subtitle "Six People Who Faced Adversity and Transformed Their Lives" isn't entirely accurate. I really think she just thought these were six good stories so wanted to make a book but any real connection for all six is a stretch. The final story is about a woman who went from choosing to live a subsistence lifestyle to owning a multimillion dollar company. Is the adversity being poor when choosing to live that lifestyle? At any rate, each story on it's own was interesting but a few things did bug me. Our first story deals with a woman who after being in an abusive relationship and losing her kids, leaves the guy, loses hundreds of pounds and regains custody. She later becomes a life coach. This is inspiring except that one question kept popping into my mind while listening and Hota never asked it. The woman after gaining her kids back, moves in with another guy shortly after that, then another guy after that. It seemed to me like she always had to have a man and never got comfortable just being herself. It seemed so crazy after what she put her kids through to move them in with another guy right away. But Hota never asks her about that. After that story was a woman who survived cancer and went on to help cancer patients by getting the medical community to deal with issues of fertility loss differently. Those two made me think our book was about people who suffered something them went on to do something for others. But the next two stories were a little off from that. I was fascinated by the woman who recovered from epilepsy and became an ultra marathoner. (I had never heard of ultramarathons.) I am just not sure how that fits the theme. Similarly there is man who stops doing drugs after his sister is murdered and helps to influence the prosecution of her killer. There is also the man who helped a burn victim on 9/11 only to learn later his sister and niece had died that day. That is certainly a powerful story but I kept waiting to see what he was going to do and that was apparently just be a regular happy guy. So although the stories were interesting, I don't think Hota or her book added anything to them.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Murder of a Real Bad Boy: A Scumble River Mystery, Book 8

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Denise Swanson
    • Narrated By Christine Leto
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (84)
    Performance
    (78)
    Story
    (78)

    Still recovering from breaking up with her boyfriend and alienating half the people in town, Skye Denison has sworn off men - but she hires sexy contractor Beau Hamilton to renovate the old house she inherited. After all, who can ignore his qualifications? Golden hair, bronzed chest, muscular thighs - he’s just too good to be true. Sure enough, he has a reputation for conning the ladies. But before the not so nave Skye can fire the hunk, he turns up dead.

    Karen says: "Liked it - But not my favorite"
    "Liked it - But not my favorite"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I enjoy all the Scumble River Mysteries because I have become attached to the characters. The narrator is always great as well. There are a few things that prevent this one from being a favorite. I was very much looking forward to some exciting changes in Skye's love life in this book. I had gotten tired of her previous relationship and was very much looking forward to a new relationship in this book. But it never really makes progress. Skye spends a lot of time being obsessed about "taking it slow" and when she does get about to get close to her new man, something prevents it every time. So that was a letdown. The mystery was okay except that it was the only time that comes to mind where I knew who the guilty party was way before Skye did. She seemed a little clueless this time around.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Coming Clean

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Kimberly Rae Miller
    • Narrated By Kimberly Rae Miller
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (251)
    Performance
    (223)
    Story
    (226)

    Kim Miller is an immaculately put-together woman with a great career, a loving boyfriend, and a tidy apartment on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. You would never guess that Kim grew up behind the closed doors of her family’s idyllic Long Island house, navigating between teetering stacks of aging newspapers, broken computers, and boxes upon boxes of unused junk festering in every room - the product of her father’s painful and unending struggle with hoarding. In this moving coming-of-age story, Kim brings to life her rat-infested home and her childhood consumed by concealing her father’s shameful secret from friends.

    Margaret says: "Vicarious Hoarding"
    "Fascinating, and a Quick read"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am one of those people who is fascinated by hoarding and I have watched a ton of shows on TV about it, but this book was so much better than those shows. Getting to know the characters better and seeing them change over time really added dimension that is missing on those TV shows. It was particularly interesting to watch roles within the family change over time as Miller transitions from the child to an almost parental role in dealing with her parents. It is amazing how the background of challenges created such a strong person. I liked too that this was a book about a challenging childhood without being one of the many abuse memoirs. I liked Miller's narration too once I got over wishing she would speak just a little louder.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Murder of a Smart Cookie: A Scumble River Mystery, Book 7

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs)
    • By Denise Swanson
    • Narrated By Christine Leto
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (92)
    Performance
    (86)
    Story
    (85)

    Yard sales can bring out the worst in people. So when Scumble River school psychologist Skye Denison organizes a 100-mile yard sale, otherwise neighborly folk get downright nasty: her own mother creams a woman, and a battle of the sexes breaks out. But when her former boss is found murdered, nobody knows for sure how this cookie will crumble.

    Karen says: "My Favorite Scumble River So Far"
    "My Favorite Scumble River So Far"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    For those of you who enjoy Skye and Scumble River but find her and Simon to be a bit goody goody and dull sometimes, this is the book for you. I had gotten bored with Simon, and in this book he isn't around much and Skye seems pretty bored by him too, so finally she was up to some more exciting things in her personal life. There is a lot of relationship drama with various couples in town in this book as well. It also shakes up the status quo because Skye is not in school in this one, she is running an enormous yard sale. As tends to happen there are a number of snooty newcomers in town trying to bully Skye and her small town cohorts. I did not know who the killer was in this one. At any rate I enjoyed a little something different in this one and am looking forward to seeing where it goes in the next book. And not too much Bunny in this one either - she only made me cringe once, though it was a big cringe. Narrator does a great job, voices are all spot on.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Murder of a Pink Elephant: A Scumble River Mystery, Book 6

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Denise Swanson
    • Narrated By Christine Leto
    Overall
    (95)
    Performance
    (86)
    Story
    (86)

    When Skye Denison's brother forms a band called Pink Elephant, the town goes wild-maybe too wild. First, a groupie turns stalker, seducing the band members one by one. Then, one of the Pink Elephants winds up murdered. Who's to blame? Everyone seems to think it's the drummer - and now Skye has to clear her brother's name.

    Karen says: "Another Good Small Town Cozy"
    "Another Good Small Town Cozy"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am a Scumble River fan and have enjoyed all the books in the series so far to various degrees. (I am not sure these would work well as stand alones - a lot of what I enjoy about them is from getting to know the town and its people in previous installments.) I think this one is definitely a step up from the last one, which was not a favorite. This book gets back to the focus on small town life and a lot is going on. We have a school dance, a mayoral election campaign, a developer trying to buy up farmland for an amusement park, drug dealing, a new bowling alley and of course. murder. Skye has a valid reason (other than her natural nosiness) for getting involved this time around since her brother Vince has managed to get himself in yet another sticky situation. I was getting a bit annoyed for a while with the depiction of all law enforcement though. I mean how likely is it that the police department of this small town has totally failed to notice a sudden meth problem and that they would need to be educated about it by Skye whose knowledge all came from some printouts someone gave her from the internet? Speaking of the internet and technology in general, this book has a dated feel (paperback is from 2004) because Skye doesn't know anything about the internet and cell phones still seem very rare. Emailing the police chief doesn't seem to be a possibility and Skye has to go to his house to reach him. In all fairness I think today's technology makes it harder to write mysteries. At least we don't go through all those elaborate reasons for some character not to be able to use their phone. (I remember a Rita Mae Brown mystery where there were so many unlikely occurrences happening just to explain why things that could have been resolved or avoided quickly by a cell phone call are not.) Swanson has her own quirks. In general I enjoy Skye even if she and Simon are a little too goody goody to be entirely accessible, but I can see why a friend says she is annoyed that Skye has to constantly go over her status as a plus sized woman - there are constant references to her curves, her bulk, her padding, etc. She gets attacked in this one by a mean spirited thin woman for her dessert consumption. Seriously though, Skye does eat a lot of cake! I didn't find Swanson at her most believable in the drug part of the plot, everyone just seemed so naive. But I enjoyed the small town atmosphere and the complex overlapping plot pieces and have already downloaded the next in the series.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Long Way Home: Chief Inspector Gamache, Book 10

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Louise Penny
    • Narrated By Ralph Cosham
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (841)
    Performance
    (765)
    Story
    (761)

    Happily retired in the village of Three Pines, Armand Gamache, former Chief Inspector of Homicide with the Sûreté du Québec, has found a peace he'd only imagined possible. On warm summer mornings he sits on a bench holding a small book, The Balm in Gilead, in his large hands. "There is a balm in Gilead," his neighbor Clara Morrow reads from the dust jacket, "to make the wounded whole." While Gamache doesn't talk about his wounds and his balm, Clara tells him about hers. Peter, her artist husband, has failed to come home. Failed to show up as promised on the first anniversary of their separation. She wants Gamache's help to find him. Having finally found sanctuary, Gamache feels a near revulsion at the thought of leaving Three Pines. "There’s power enough in Heaven," he finishes the quote as he contemplates the quiet village, "to cure a sin-sick soul." And then he gets up. And joins her.

    David Walker says: "Back in 3 Pines"
    "Happy Gamache is Back, but some issues"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I would think that in general if you have read all the books in this series, that you would want to read this one and that you would enjoy it. Penny really makes you feel connected to these characters. The end of the last book didn't linger on the happy ending so I was happy to return to the peaceful world of Three Pines and get back in touch with our characters in a more relaxed post retirement time. The book is really a search for a missing person rather than a murder investigation. I found it less stressful that the previous books. I have to say that at various times I really wished I remembered some of the past books better particularly A Rule Against Murder and whichever one had the Gilberts in it. You get a lot of what you expect from Penny - long deep discussions about art among other things and you wouldn't have gotten this far in the series without being able to enjoy or at least tolerate that. This is definitely not a stand alone book - none of them really are. I have always found the author to be more interested in Peter Morrow than I was, but he's actually more interesting when you just talk about him rather than have him on screen. There's some touching sadness at the end, and some over the top perhaps not entirely believable aspects of the mystery which may annoy some readers but I was satisfied with it overall.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Murder of a Barbie and Ken: A Scumble River Mystery, Book 5

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs)
    • By Denise Swanson
    • Narrated By Christine Leto
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (96)
    Performance
    (88)
    Story
    (86)

    In search of a social life in Scumble River, Skye Denison has recently joined the GUMBettes - the ladies auxiliary of the men's Grand Union of the Mighty Bulls. Now she and her boyfriend Simon hobnob with the upwardly mobile professionals in town. But when a seemingly perfect couple is murdered, Skye discovers that success doesn't equal survival....

    Karen says: "Love the series, This one not my favorite"
    "Love the series, This one not my favorite"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I always enjoy a Scumble River mystery. I enjoyed this one as well, but it wasn't my favorite for a few reasons. In this book, Skye and Simon are trying to blend in with other classy couples. The people they end up with aren't the most pleasant pleasant characters and the book takes us to some aspects of life in this small town that definitely turned me off. (I don't want to give anything away, but some people you just don't even want to imagine naked.) We also have the introduction of the character of Simon's mother Bunny, who is especially annoyiong on audio and who brings out two qualities in Skye that are not my favorites either - (1) her wimpiness or is that small town hospitality? and (2) her preachiness - for example, I think it is perfectly ok for someone who had been betrayed and abandoned as a child not to pursue a relationship with that parent. Overall it was one of the more forgettable plots (it took me a few minutes just now to even remember who did it), but I will keep on with the series.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Methland: The Death and Life of an American Small Town

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Nick Reding
    • Narrated By Mark Boyett
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (686)
    Performance
    (301)
    Story
    (307)

    Crystal methamphetamine is widely considered to be the most dangerous drug in the world, and nowhere is that more true than in the small towns of the American heartland. Methland tells the story of Oelwein, Iowa (pop. 6,159), which, like thousands of other small towns across the country, has been left in the dust by the consolidation of the agricultural industry, a depressed local economy, and an out-migration of people.

    Sean says: "Interesting, then not."
    "Good, but not quite what I was expecting"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was expecting a portrait of an American town impacted by meth, mostly communicated with portraits of individual users. And there is some of this. But there is a lot more of looking at meth through a bigger lens, with discussions of economics and politics etc. While certainly educational, that wasn't my favorite part. In all fairness the book I thought it was going to be would have been a downer since I have learned why exactly meth is such a hard drug to come clean from and our recovering user portraits support this. There are also a lot of portraits of non-users, in law enforcement, politics and other roles within small town America. I think there was more of that than I wanted. I think the author enjoys going off on tangents about individual people. There was one point in the book where this got so obvious that I took a break from listening for a long time. The author was telling the life story of a guy who was brought as a guest to a barbecue of a guy who works as a doctor in the town. The guest was from Central America I think it was and the author was going on about the political environment from which this guy came. It was so off the topic of small town meth I lost interest. I think the editor should have flagged that. Overall it was educational, interesting and well performed, but good rather than great.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • How the Light Gets In: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel, Book 9

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Louise Penny
    • Narrated By Ralph Cosham
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1259)
    Performance
    (1136)
    Story
    (1135)

    Shadows are falling on the usually festive Christmas season for Chief Inspector Armand Gamache. When Gamache receives a message from Myrna Landers that a longtime friend has failed to arrive for Christmas in the village of Three Pines, he welcomes the chance to get away from the city. Gamache soon discovers the missing woman was once one of the most famous people not just in North America, but in the world, and now goes unrecognized by virtually everyone. As events come to a head, Gamache is drawn ever deeper into the world of Three Pines.

    Nancy J says: "Welcome Home!"
    "90 Percent Difficult Slog, 10 Percent Happy Ending"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It's very hard to actually rate this book. I really didn't want to read this since I hated the last book so much, but I was trying to get the characters I had grown so fond of out of their predicaments. I wanted to see things resolved and happy. I have to tell you it's a long way to get there. It took me forever to listen to this book, and I had to be convinced by a friend to restart it after bogging down mid way. One of the things I always liked about Gamache was his presence, how he was always calm and courteous but strong. In this book, we get weepy, cranky, beaten down, all sorts of Gamaches that just made the book less enjoyable than the old ones. I suppose I shouldn't complain about Jean Guy being so frustrating and tedious since that is probably an accurate portrayal of life with an addict, but still it isn't fun to read. I did find the mystery surrounding the murder Gamache is investigating to be somewhat interesting though it does peter out at the end. Unlike previous books the investigation of the murder isn't the main point and we don't really see it wrap up. I did guess some of the things that were going to happen, and I usually don't. I suppose I am glad that I forced myself through to the end to see happier times for all our beloved characters. You'll probably be happy you did too, but it really is a long way to get there.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • What Dies in Summer: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By Tom Wright
    • Narrated By Chris Patton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (5)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (4)

    “I did what I did, and that’s on me.” From that tantalizing first sentence, Tom Wright sweeps listeners up in a tale of lost innocence. Jim has a touch of the Sight. It’s nothing too spooky and generally useless, at least until the summer his cousin L.A. moves in with him and their grandmother. When Jim and L.A. discover the body of a girl - brutally raped and murdered - in a field, an investigation begins that will put both their lives in danger.

    Karen says: "Odd Book, Great Narrator, Not as Grisly as Feared"
    "Odd Book, Great Narrator, Not as Grisly as Feared"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The is not an easy book to describe. I suppose you could say that it is a coming of age story that also involves a police investigation into a series of killings. Because the victims were raped and mutilated I feared a lot of disturbing detail. We do get some information on the deaths, and a psychic flash here or there, but the book really does not dwell on the suffering and gory details as so often happens in books with serial killers (I try never to read those books). There is enough there to bother someone super sensitive I guess but I am pretty sensitive and found this book did not bother me. There are some other things that might bother some people. The book does have a certain atmosphere that might not appeal to everyone. You know when you are watching the news and they find the body of a young girl raped and murdered at a trailer park, and go on to report she lived with her exotic dancer mom and the mom's abusive alcoholic boyfriend and 5 sex offenders lived within 200 feet - and you just shake your head and think how this person was doomed from the get go? That is what the atmosphere of this book is like. Loads of family dysfunction, abuse and failure. I almost stopped reading very early in the book because the atmosphere was so unpleasant and made me uncomfortable but that feeling faded further on. It makes an amazing contrast that our narrator (Loved the narrator!) radiated such genuine goodness and innocence despite being raised in such an environment. In general I do not like books which are narrated from a teenage boy's point of view. But Biscuit was such a decent guy, that even when he had the sexual thoughts expected of a teenage boy it wasn't creepy. As some other reviews pointed out we certainly had a choice of suspects. One odd thing is in the book's usage of the paranormal element. Biscuit himself says he has "a touch of the sight but not enough to actually be useful" (or words to that effect). That is amazingly true. It seemed to me that there was not enough made of this paranormal element if the reader likes that element and too much made of it if the reader doesn't like it. There are also some chunks of the book where we seem to go off on tangents with certain characters who are peripheral to the main plot. I suppose these sequences make sense when viewing the story as a coming of age tale. I didn't love the book, but it did hold my attention and has stuck with me since I finished it. I also liked that we do get some wrap up on the various characters, though not everyone ends up exactly as I would have liked. Of course if they had that probably would have seemed strange in a book with so much dysfunction. Many characters are frustrating in how they don't necessarily create their own problems, but they do fail in stopping them from continuing. I don't think I would have liked the book nearly as much in print. Narrator certainly helps the reader feel connected to the story, and gives them someone to cheer for.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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