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Thomas

I struggled in the sixties to get a college education, barely graduated, spent a life in the phone company as a technician in a call center.

Chicago, IL, United States | Member Since 2014

124
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 35 reviews
  • 929 ratings
  • 0 titles in library
  • 21 purchased in 2015
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FOLLOWERS
31

  • The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Charles Fishman
    • Narrated By Stephen Hoye
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (275)
    Performance
    (209)
    Story
    (209)

    The water coming out of your tap is four billion years old and might have been slurped by a Tyrannosaurus Rex. We will always have exactly as much water on Earth as we have ever had. Water cannot be destroyed, and it can always be made clean enough for drinking again. In fact, water can be made so clean that it actually becomes toxic. As Charles Fishman brings vibrantly to life in this delightful narrative excursion, water runs our world in a host of awe-inspiring ways, which is both the promise and the peril of our unexplored connections to it.

    Lynn says: "Informative Book"
    "Important, well-written book."
    Overall

    I found this book interesting to hear, well-written, well-researched, and very important to the survival of our civilizations.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • The Price of Civilization: Reawakening American Virtue and Prosperity

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By Jeffrey D. Sachs
    • Narrated By Richard McGonagle
    Overall
    (72)
    Performance
    (58)
    Story
    (57)

    The Price of Civilization is the blueprint for America’s economic recovery. It is also the story of how America can and must restore the virtues of fairness, honesty, and foresight as the foundations of national prosperity. As he has done in dozens of countries around the world in the midst of economic crisis, Sachs turns his unique diagnostic skills to what ails the American economy.

    Thomas says: "Dr, Sachs has become depression"
    "Dr, Sachs has become depression"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    Dr. Sachs wrote Common Wealth, and I liked it, but The Price of Civilization, about the USA is really, really depressing. He's right, the facts are true, his conclusions are true, but it was so depressing. There don't seem to be any solutions. I just read the first half, and gave up.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Scientific Secrets for Self-Control

    • ORIGINAL (3 hrs and 1 min)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor C. Nathan DeWall
    Overall
    (442)
    Performance
    (373)
    Story
    (366)

    Join an expert in self-control research for six engaging and inspirational lessons that shatter the myths about willpower and replace them with verifiable science that can make the seemingly unattainable finally possible. Packed with eye-opening studies, experiments, and exercises to strengthen your self-control when dealing with money, fitness, personal relationships, and more, this course will have you wondering why you ever doubted yourself.

    DaemonZeiro says: "Don't skimp on this one"
    "Give this author/professor his just dessert"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What made the experience of listening to Scientific Secrets for Self-Control the most enjoyable?

    The previous reviews criticized this Professor for talking about experiments to study behavior, said that the experiments weren't relevant, and said that the Professor's statements were not true. I found the same thing, but I need self-control too much to give it short shrift. When I listened to the last three half-hour lectures, I found that I could go back to the beginning of the course and listen to it straight though, I could understand it, and it was very helpful to me. The professor says that people who are more successful, richer, and more healthy, had a greater degree of self-control and ability to delay gratification for greater rewards, from their earlier days. That same author says that one can learn to get enough rest and relaxation, food and calories, before making decision behaviors, and that self-control is like a muscle that improves with use. Also, he says that violent people have less self control. So, I suppose you could say that people can learn to get enough rest and relaxation, food and calories, before the occasion presents itself of being violent or committing a crime. Perhaps this understanding could help people in areas of the world who are plagued by violence and war, to have peaceful outcomes, such as Israel, where life has been a never-ending nightmare.


    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • After the Music Stopped: The Financial Crisis, the Response, and the Work Ahead

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Alan S. Blinder
    • Narrated By Graham Vick
    Overall
    (33)
    Performance
    (27)
    Story
    (26)

    Alan S. Blinder - esteemed Princeton professor, Wall Street Journal columnist, and former vice chairman of the Federal Reserve Board under Alan Greenspan - is one of our wisest and most clear-eyed economic thinkers. In After the Music Stopped, he delivers a masterful narrative of how the worst economic crisis in postwar American history happened, what the government did to fight it, and what we must do to recover from it.

    Thomas says: "Irresponsible, corrupt, and confused book"
    "Irresponsible, corrupt, and confused book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    From the beginning, Professor Blinder makes false assertions and follows them with confusing, complicated statistics which fail to prove his assertions. For example, he states that no one in the world predicted the housing bubble. Then he describes the real price changes on houses, which he says went up far too fast. Lot's of people knew that the savings and loan associations had fallen from a burst bubble, and then the internet companies. Anyone who went shopping for a house could tell you that houses were overpriced, decrepit, and poorly maintained and not worth the price. The investment company wheelers and dealers were making a fortune in fees selling the houses, but lots of people realized they were being deceived and had no choice but to buy at high prices. Houses never go up in value. Houses depreciate from the time they are built, just as cars do. People were buying houses without realizing that businessmen were in a frenzy of automating jobs and laying off workers, who then couldn't pay their mortgage payments. Professor Blinder is blind to all of this, and asserts that government was unable to properly regulate the housing market, and that was the cause of the crash. Wrong on so many counts. I worked for Citi's subsidiary Primeamerica briefly, refinancing housing loans with a claim that the owner of the house would pay less if he bought with fees a loan from Primeamerica. We were trained to lie to the owner, and not give them the statistics on the price of the loan until the minute they signed for the loan. Citi was slipping millions in campaign donations to our representatives to pass bills that ignored the whole problem. That is just one example of Professor Blinder's false assertions, saying that government regulators caused the bursting of the bubble. Don't buy this book. Don't give it the time of day.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Reading Skills

    • ABRIDGED (54 mins)
    • By Jeanne Godfrey
    • Narrated By Adjoa Andoh
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Make the most of all the reading you do at university by listening to this audiobook. Unpicking the myths surrounding this core skill, Reading Skills helps you decide what to read, how to read it and, crucially, what your lecturers expect of you.

    Thomas says: "Good short (abridged) book."
    "Good short (abridged) book."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you listen to Reading Skills again? Why?

    Yes. It was very helpful for me as an Audible listener. It shows some things that sometimes slip our minds when we exposed to a barrage of opinions every day in the newspaper we have chosen from Audible, such as the opinions of the Wall Street Journal or New York Times. The author says to remember who they work for as we begin to read their material, which is sooo true.


    What did you like best about this story?

    Although in the format of a college great course book, it was short enough (one hour) that I didn't lose attention and abandon it. I have a short attention span when it comes to college courses and college lectures.


    Any additional comments?

    Audible should give this book for free as a customer perk, because it is very helpful in selecting the books one will buy and listen to in the future. Customers can come back to this book over and over again, for guidance and inspiration in their reading explorations.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Winter of the World: The Century Trilogy, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (31 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Ken Follett
    • Narrated By John Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (6270)
    Performance
    (5323)
    Story
    (5338)

    Winter of the World picks up right where the first book left off, as its five interrelated families - American, German, Russian, English, Welsh - enter a time of enormous social, political, and economic turmoil, beginning with the rise of the Third Reich, through the Spanish Civil War and the great dramas of World War II, up to the explosions of the American and Soviet atomic bombs. As always with Ken Follett, the historical background is brilliantly researched and rendered, the action fast-moving, the characters rich in nuance and emotion.

    Tim says: "Brilliant Sequel"
    "Reading this book made me a better person."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    If you could sum up Winter of the World in three words, what would they be?

    World War II


    Any additional comments?

    Before you ever make a comment on a blog or facebook again, about politics, about the USA, about its history of military actions around the world, please, read this book. It will change your mind for the better, and help you understand the USA so much better. Promise.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Infinite Possibilities: The Art of Living your Dreams

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Mike Dooley
    • Narrated By Mike Dooley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (233)
    Performance
    (125)
    Story
    (127)

    Manifesting our dreams isn't about hard work -- it's about belief, expectation and, above all, knowing the truth about our place in the universe. Mike Dooley's manifesto, Infinite Possibilities, affirms that in our world of illusions there is no finite allotment of whatever your heart desires, especially not happiness, and that experiencing more love and new possibilities is limited only by the scope of our ability to imagine and act upon each.

    C says: "Surprisingly intelligent"
    "The Author is Mentally Ill, Spreading His Illness"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    The things that he says are not healthy for human beings to believe. The author is living in a fantasy world.

    3 of 13 people found this review helpful
  • The Question of God: C. S. Lewis and Sigmund Freud Debate God, Love, Sex, and the Meaning of Life

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Armand M. Nicholi
    • Narrated By Robert Whitfield
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (69)
    Performance
    (45)
    Story
    (44)

    Renowned psychiatrist and educator Armand Nicholi here presents a fascinating comparison of the beliefs of Sigmund Freud and C. S. Lewis. In the 20th century, no spokesman was more prominent for nonbelief than Sigmund Freud, and no one argued for belief more successfully than C. S. Lewis. From pain and suffering to love and sex, from God to morality, Lewis and Freud carefully argued opposing positions and even considered the chief objections to their positions.

    Glenda says: "Excellent rivals!"
    "Prejudice of the author masks his errors."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    The author starts by saying he is comparing C.S.Lewis with Sigmund Freud. He quotes Freud's letters and finds all of his human faults, and says that proves Freud was wrong about his views of God. I have read Freud's books, not his letters, and find his books inspiring of further study in psychology and very descriptive of the processes of the mind and thought, which it was Freud's intent to do. I thought this author's descriptions of Freud extremely irrational and prejudiced. I would not buy or read this book, but, instead, buy and read Freud's books about psychoanalysis and other things, following your curiousity thru all of Freud's books. They are awesome. This author of "The Question of God" is not.

    2 of 12 people found this review helpful
  • BBC Newshour

    • Abridged/Unabridged (59 mins)
    • By Owen Bennett-Jones, Claire Bolderson, Alex Brodie, and others
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    What program can listeners depend on to cover everything from the growth of democracy to the threat of terrorism, from invasions and cataclysmic natural disasters to inspiring humanitarian triumphs? Newshour, the BBC's flagship news program that specializes in bringing listeners not only the facts but also the in-depth analysis and commentary behind the headlines.

    Thomas says: "BBC spins truth about owner killing of his miners."
    "BBC spins truth about owner killing of his miners."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What disappointed you about BBC Newshour?

    Clearly, the police began murdering striking platinum miners in South Africa, without provocation, and were in the wrong. Clearly, they were ordered to do this by the UK CEO. Clearly USA car makers in Detroit who need the platinum for pollution control devices currently used on all vehicles pressured him into the murders. Yet, the BBC Newshour reported none of this. From the BBC report, which is a mess of confusing statements, the real cause was workers demanding safer working conditions or double their wages. Now the BBC has joined industry in the murder of workers, and I will never listen to its news report again in the same way.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The World

    • Abridged/Unabridged (1 hr)
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    Thomas says: "PRI The World distorted truth about USA"
    "PRI The World distorted truth about USA"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What disappointed you about The World?

    Yesterday, Aug. 20, 2012, The World reported on the slaughter of South African platinum miners protesting their unsafe working conditions and low wages. The slaughter was caused by a UK accountant in charge of the Lonmin Mining Company, and motivated by the pressure of USA and Japanese auto makers for platinum to be cheap so they can use it for devices of vehicles that cut emissions of poisonous materials from their exhaust as they move. The World reported only that the miners fired on police first, which clearly wasn't true, from viewing the pictures and video clips. I will never forgive the World and the USA for this great evil. Let the world's people never forget it.


    What was most disappointing about the author’s story?

    The USA is doing many grave evils in the world today, as in its past, and if our news media never reports the truth and the true causes of this behavior, it will never end. Human civilization cannot continue on this planet in such a state of suffering. The news media is responsible.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The New York Times Audio Digest

    • Abridged/Unabridged (51 mins)
    Overall
    (306)
    Performance
    (187)
    Story
    (169)

    Townsend says: "Nominee for worst performance by a narrator"
    "Today the NYT revealed its bad character."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    Today the NYT presented the apparent winner of the election July 1, 2012, of the election for President in Mexico, Enrique Pina-Nieto, as a PRI autocrat who would bring dictatorship to the Mexican people. On the contrary, he is not a dictator. He campaigned promising to refocus the work of the government from slaving to the desires of the USA, which is buying street drugs thru Mexico, and, at the very same time, selling the weapons it makes to bad Mexican people who do this and to the government leaders in the Mexico who fight violently with them, and electing leaders in the USA who support the whole process, such as by making street drugs people criminals. The USA continues to abuse Mexican immigrants to do work no American wants to do for the pay, and deports Mexican immigrants who commit any crimes to Mexico to plague that country. These USA behaviors are causing great violence and corruption in Mexican government units and businesses, and thousands of Mexican citizens are being tortured and murdered as a direct result. The NYT is siding with the wrong side in this issue, and, I feel very unhappy with the spin of the articles and editorials it is broadcasting to Americans. I take care of my family, too, but my family is all good people on the planet. alive today and coming soon.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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