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Scott

Scarborough, ON, Canada | Member Since 2013

119
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 87 reviews
  • 188 ratings
  • 426 titles in library
  • 1 purchased in 2015
FOLLOWING
4
FOLLOWERS
9

  • Hanns and Rudolf: The German Jew and the Hunt for the Kommandant of Auschwitz

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Thomas Harding
    • Narrated By Mark Meadows
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    Hanns Alexander was the son of a wealthy German family who fled Berlin for London in the 1930s. Rudolf Höss was a farmer and soldier who became Kommandant of Auschwitz and oversaw the deaths of over a million people. In the aftermath of World War II, the first British War Crimes Investigation Team is assembled to hunt down the senior Nazi officials responsible for the greatest atrocities the world has ever seen.

    Scott says: "Rudolf a more compelling story than Hans"
    "Rudolf a more compelling story than Hans"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

    Parallel narratives between the rise and fall of Rudolf Hoess, infamous commandant of Auschwitz and the fall and rise of the Jewish refugee who led the hunt converge in the Nazi's ultimate capture. Hoess' tale has been told before but the story of his pursuer, a distant relative of the author, adds a fatalistic element. Will appeal to those with an interest in the how the Nazi war criminals we're brought to justice as well as those who like a decent true life detective story.


    What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

    The fate of Hoess won't come as a surprise but the pursuit and how he was captured might. The fact that Hans was a relative of the author and how this impacted him brings a nice personal element to the telling.


    What does Mark Meadows bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Hans' backstory and the subtle reminder that the generation who lived to tell this tale will soon no longer be with us.


    Was Hanns and Rudolf: The German Jew and the Hunt for the Kommandant of Auschwitz worth the listening time?

    I enjoyed it. There are some interesting and suspenseful elements in Hoess' evasion and pursuit. My one complaint is that as heroic as Hans was and as vile as Hoess was, it was Hoess' narrative line that was more compelling and interesting sad to say.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Bowie: The Biography

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Wendy Leigh
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (27)
    Performance
    (22)
    Story
    (23)

    Discover the man behind the myth in this new biography of one of the most pioneering and influential performers of our time - David Bowie. David Bowie - the iconic superstar of rock, fashion, art, design, and the quintessential sexual liberator - is a living legend. However, for the past five decades, he has managed to retain his Hollywood star mystique. Now, New York Times bestselling author Wendy Leigh reveals the real man behind the mythology. Through

    Madeira Darling says: "More Like This, PLEASE"
    "Trashy"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What was most disappointing about Wendy Leigh’s story?

    This bio has lots of sex, some drugs, and precious little rock and roll. While you would never expect a bio of David Bowie to be G-rated, this trashy bit of work does a hatchet job on an arguably music and entertainment pioneer. The author seems to have based much of her material on the recollections of groupies and hangers on with the result being lots of details on Bowie’s sex life but comparatively little on his music and its impact. In particular, she seems to have a lurid fixation on the size of Bowie’s genitalia and she comes back to this topic ad nauseum. The narration – delivered in dry, Queen’s English, couldn’t be more at odd’s with the subject matter and brings to mind the John Cleese sex ed teacher bit from The Meaning of Life. If you are looking to find out about Bowie the musician, his influences and impact, you won’t find it here.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Teenage Brain: A Neuroscientist's Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Frances E. Jensen, Amy Ellis Nutt
    • Narrated By Jane Jacobs
    Overall
    (21)
    Performance
    (20)
    Story
    (19)

    In this groundbreaking, accessible book, Dr. Frances E. Jensen, a mother, teacher, researcher, and internationally known expert in neurology, introduces us to the mystery and magic of the teen brain. One of the first books to focus exclusively on the neurological development of adolescents, The Teenage Brain presents new findings, dispels widespread myths, and provides practical suggestions for negotiating this difficult and dynamic life stage for both adults and adolescents.

    phoneman says: "technical"
    "Useful book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    I found lots to like about this audiobook – the folksy prose, the scientific research underpinning its claims, the author’s willingness to share her experiences raising two teenage sons. This is a useful primer for any parent seeking to better understand the teenage mind and also a handy how to manual for raising teenagers in the modern world. Once you come to grips with the notion that teenagers are not hormone addled children nor are they merely inexperienced adults, the rest of the book’s claims hardly seem earth shattering and indeed, the book tends to repeat a handful of core ideas over and over again. Nevertheless, the book is entertaining, easy to read, has lots of fascinating insights into the still developing mind of a teenager, and to its credit, offers no easy bromides or false promises that if you do x as a parent everything will be okay. Rather, this is the thinking person’s parenting guide, a sort of What to Expect When You’re Expecting a Teenager and as such, should probably be required reading for any parent.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Bryan Stevenson
    • Narrated By Bryan Stevenson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (104)
    Performance
    (93)
    Story
    (94)

    Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit.

    Jean says: "Thought Provoking"
    "Admirable but sterile"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about Just Mercy? What did you like least?

    There is a lot to admire about the subject matter of this audiobook: the dedication and selfless determination of Bryan Stevenson, the work he and his fellow lawyers have done to help those on death row who were wrongly convicted, his advocacy for equal justice and legal reform. All of this is chronicled mostly through the case experiences of a half dozen or so different clients with a particular focus on one, Walter, whose tragic story weaves throughout the narrative. The sum is an informative and damning indictment of the justice system in the deep south. Still, I found the narrative engaged the intellect more than the heart, which seems counterintuitive given the David vs. Goliath subject matter. Part of my problem with the book was its broad scope and lack of “in the weeds” details, both of which are essential for the reader to put themselves in Stevenson’s and his client’s shoes. Rather, the story meanders through different cases, with only a slightly better than cursory overview of the people, legal arguments and courtroom maneuvering that went on in each case. Granted, you don’t expect Just Mercy to be a John Grisham novel, but perhaps if it had focused on just one or two cases and what it took to expose their injustices and right the wrongs it would have been a more compelling and engaging book.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Elizabeth Kolbert
    • Narrated By Anne Twomey
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (449)
    Performance
    (405)
    Story
    (402)

    A major audiobook about the future of the world, blending intellectual and natural history and field reporting into a powerful account of the mass extinction unfolding before our eyes. Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on Earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs.

    Male Perspective says: "Better than expected! Great Book!"
    "Compelling"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    I found this to be an utterly fascinating audiobook, a chronicle of the often deleterious effects that humanity/civilization has had on the diversity of living organisms with whom we share the planet. This isn’t really a book about climate change per se, though it certainly appears in the narrative. Rather, this is an in depth examination of the so called anthropocene, the most recent ecological era characterized by humanity’s purposeful altering of the Earth’s biosphere. Kolbert expertly chronicles this by focusing on a dozen or so past and present species – from coral reefs, Auks, Mastadons, cave dwelling bats, and Neanderthals to name a few – and how humanity, purposefully but also at times unintentionally, has caused their extinction or brought them to the brink. Though this might sound like depressing stuff, Kolbert smartly keeps the focus on the science and scientists, avoids moralizing, and for the most part lets the listener draw their own conclusions. The end result is a sharp, thoughtful, and at times humorous book that is part forensic detective story, part elegy and full bore wake up call to what we are doing to the biodiversity of this planet. A worthwhile and entertaining read for tree huggers and skeptics alike.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Atul Gawande
    • Narrated By Robert Petkoff
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (341)
    Performance
    (281)
    Story
    (280)

    In Being Mortal, bestselling author Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending. Medicine has triumphed in modern times, transforming birth, injury, and infectious disease from harrowing to manageable. But in the inevitable condition of aging and death, the goals of medicine seem too frequently to run counter to the interest of the human spirit.

    George K. says: "A Walk through the Valley of the Shadow"
    "Worthwhile read poses tough questions"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    Not always an easy listen, I found Being Mortal nevertheless to be an important one, especially for anyone in the "sandwich" generation or who otherwise might be thinking ahead to their senior years. The book challenges the listener to contemplate what really matters when old age, infirmity, or terminal illness occurs - is it important to add days to life or life to days. Gawande - a physician - asserts that the health care establishment has historically opted for the former when most patients in their care would probably want the latter if we only took the time and effort to ask. This raises poignant, often troublesome or difficult decisions on the part of individuals, their adult children, medical practitioners and the health care system. This is an intelligent and well argued book with only a few key messages. Gawande ably grounds his arguments in the experiences of his family and patients which keeps the narrative moving and makes the messages hit close to home. Being Mortal offers no easy answers but is good at getting the conversation started. In all this is a worthwhile listen though not always a pleasant one. The narration is top shelf.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Ojibwa Warrior: Dennis Banks and the Rise of the American Indian Movement

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Dennis Banks, Richard Erdoes
    • Narrated By Douglas Rye
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Dennis Banks, an American Indian of the Ojibwa Tribe and a founder of the American Indian Movement, is one of the most influential Indian leaders of our time. In Ojibwa Warrior, written with acclaimed writer and photographer Richard Erdoes, Banks tells his own story for the first time and also traces the rise of the American Indian Movement (AIM).

    Scott says: "By the numbers bio"
    "By the numbers bio"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

    This is a straightforward autobiography of Dennis Banks, one of the founders of the American Indian Movement (AIM). I was intrigued both by the title and the subject matter but knew little about Banks or AIM. Ojibwa Warrior does a good job of educating the listener about Banks, from his childhood through the 1970’s culminating in the militant standoff at Wounded Knee (and a bit beyond). It reads in a straightforward connect-the- dots sort of way, highlighting Banks’ personal and professional tribulations while never taking its eye off of the broader context of Indian/First Nations struggle for equal rights and autonomy. Some of the confrontations with the government, Banks’ at times semi-outlaw existence, as well as his experiences as a child (and forced removal from his family and culture) are rendered in great detail. Another plus are the many fascinating details Banks offers about Indian/First Nations culture. The competent narration is subdued and smartly lets events speak for themselves. Despite all this, I nevertheless found the narrative a bit too mechanical in a “first this happened and then this happened and then this happened” sort of way. I wouldn’t call it dry but it lacked a certain intimacy that would connect the listener emotionally with Banks and his struggles/aims. In this way, Ojibwa Warrior is educational but not inspirational which is a shame given Banks’ life/work


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail (Oprah's Book Club 2.0)

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Cheryl Strayed
    • Narrated By Bernadette Dunne
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4860)
    Performance
    (4227)
    Story
    (4240)

    At 22, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother's death, her family scattered and her own marriage was soon destroyed. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life: to hike the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State - and to do it alone. She had no experience as a long-distance hiker, and the trail was little more than “an idea, vague and outlandish and full of promise.” But it was a promise of piecing back together a life that had come undone.

    FanB14 says: "Glad I Took the Trip"
    "Works as an adventure travelogue and confessional"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about this story?

    This had been on my wishlist for awhile and I am glad to have finally listened to it. Strayed's memoir of her solo trek on the Pacific Crest Trail has a Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance feel to it - part bio, confessional, travelogue and meditation on resiliency rolled into one. I liked it on all levels and Strayed effectively interweaves reflections on her troubled relationships with her family, ex-husband, and her own personal failings throughout her experiences on the PCT that both inform the listener of her motives as well as illuminate her transformation. Add in some genuinely surprising and suspenseful experiences on the trail and you end up with a narrative that never lags. Strayed's knack for self-deprecating humor keeps all this from being too heavy or melodramatic and the narration aptly captures this. Well worth the listen!


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Kim Zetter
    • Narrated By Joe Ochman
    Overall
    (113)
    Performance
    (102)
    Story
    (101)

    Top cybersecurity journalist Kim Zetter tells the story behind the virus that sabotaged Iran’s nuclear efforts and shows how its existence has ushered in a new age of warfare - one in which a digital attack can have the same destructive capability as a megaton bomb.

    Scott says: "Engrossing cyber whodunit"
    "Engrossing cyber whodunit"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about Countdown to Zero Day?

    This is an utterly engrossing true life tale of the coders who unraveled the where when's and how's of the Stuxnet virus. Part cyber detective story, part geopolitical thriller, Countdown to Zero Day deftly takes the listener through the efforts of a small group of private cybersecurity experts who stumbled upon the virus and through dogged effort began to unravel its components to discover its true purpose. Wisely, the author reveals this piecemeal, mirroring the experiences of the cyber sleuths as they slowly crack the multidimensional virus. There are no big or juicy revelations here - anyone who has followed Iran's efforts to acquire nuclear weapons technology will have heard about Stuxnet and the alleged role the US and Israel played in it. Rather, Countdown intrigues in an All the President's Men sort of way - how intrepid doggedness on the part of ordinary people (substitute coders for reporter) can uncover the darkest and most hidden reaches of power.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Last 100 Days: The Tumultuous and Controversial Story of the Final Days of World War II in Europe

    • UNABRIDGED (27 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By John Toland
    • Narrated By Ralph Cosham
    Overall
    (56)
    Performance
    (51)
    Story
    (51)

    A dramatic countdown of the final months of World War II in Europe, The Last 100 Days brings to life the waning power and the ultimate submission of the Third Reich. To reconstruct the tumultuous hundred days between Yalta and the fall of Berlin, John Toland traveled more than 100,000 miles in twenty-one countries and interviewed more than six hundred people - from Hitler's personal chauffeur to Generals von Manteuffel, Wenck, and Heinrici.

    Kevin says: "Excellent book!"
    "Patchwork history - feels incomplete"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    Like Toland's other works, this is a good blend of military and political history and there are some nice details about how the final hundred days arguably set the tone and shape of international relations for the next 45 years. Nevertheless 100 days feels disjointed and somewhat incomplete as Toland overly dwells on certain events (e.g. Plans for the establishment of the U.N., the battle for Remagen, and especially Mussolini's demise) at the expense of seemingly equal or more pertinent ones (eg. The battle for Berlin, the German civil front). The end result feels patchwork with more than a few gaps.


    Would you recommend The Last 100 Days to your friends? Why or why not?

    May appeal to readers who like their history detailed and who aren't overly familiar with the closing days of the European theater of war.


    How did the narrator detract from the book?

    The Narrator was fine but the production was terrible, with frequent, inexplicable changes in tone and clarity. I thought at first this might be because the narrator was emphasizing a footnote before realizing it was just the sound production. In the end, the narration proved to be a distraction more than anything.


    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Mary Roach
    • Narrated By Emily Woo Zeller
    Overall
    (1543)
    Performance
    (1363)
    Story
    (1371)

    Best-selling author Mary Roach returns with a new adventure to the invisible realm we carry around inside. Roach takes us down the hatch on an unforgettable tour. The alimentary canal is classic Mary Roach terrain: The questions explored in Gulp are as taboo, in their way, as the cadavers in Stiff and every bit as surreal as the universe of zero gravity explored in Packing for Mars. Why is crunchy food so appealing? Why is it so hard to find words for flavors and smells? Why doesn’t the stomach digest itself? How much can you eat before your stomach bursts?

    Kirstin says: "Mary Roach Does Not Disappoint!"
    "Easily digestible fare"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    First off, I must admit to being a fan of Mary Roach, whose books delve into the eccentricities, trivialities, and the “have you ever wondered how” aspects of our human bodies. In this vein, Gulp dares the reader to boldly explore the splendor of what our bodies do to food from bite to bowel. Roach’s style isn’t to take any of this too seriously, or to drown the reader in arcane science; rather, she interviews experts in various fields or takes on the role of observer or occasional lab rat. All of this is infused with liberal amounts of tongue and cheek humor which is narrated in such a breezy, personal tone that I thought Roach herself was doing the narration. In the end, the reader won’t come away with anything close to encyclopedic understanding of human digestion but if that’s what you are looking for then Gulp is the wrong book for you anyway. Instead if you are looking to have a little info to go with your entertainment, and you don’t mind occasionally being a little grossed out (see the bit on tasters), Gulp may just leave you feeling a little awed by how your body works its unseen magic turning what you have eaten into what you are.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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