You no longer follow N. Rogers

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow N. Rogers

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

N. Rogers

San Antonio, TX, USA | Member Since 2008

72
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 36 reviews
  • 171 ratings
  • 872 titles in library
  • 12 purchased in 2015
FOLLOWING
3
FOLLOWERS
3

  • Pack of Two: The Intricate Bond Between People and Dogs

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Caroline Knapp
    • Narrated By Hilary Swank
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (83)
    Performance
    (72)
    Story
    (72)

    In Pack of Two, the author of the acclaimed best seller Drinking: A Love Story tackles a different sort of relationship. Two-time Academy Award-winning actress Hilary Swank (Boys Don’t Cry, Million Dollar Baby) guides us into the life of Caroline Knapp who, after losing both parents to cancer and breaking off a two-decade long relationship with alcohol in the span of one year, struggles - and succeeds - to redefine her world. The unlikely solution to Knapp’s task was found in the form of a dog named Lucille.

    Jami says: "Not what I expected, but really good!"
    "Wonderful but Somewhat Sad"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This was a fairly short book, and as a devoted dog parent, I found that it went quickly. This audiobook was narrated by Hilary Swank which added a lot to the listening experience. Pack of Two is a very personal account of the author's relationship with her dog, Lucille, and how it enriched and deepened her life. However, it provides both sides of the dog/human bond, including some of the very special benefits as well as darker aspects that, in some unfortunate cases, became pathological.

    There were times when I honestly felt sorry for Caroline Knapp because she seemed so needy and isolated. I really love our three dogs and spend a great deal of time working and playing with them, but this author was truly obsessed with Lucille, her only close connection in the world. I was glad she had this wonderful being in her life, a dog she had rescued from probable euthanasia in a shelter, but she seemed so concerned with the possible abnormality of their relationship that I pitied her a little. She gave examples of friends with similar issues, a few of whom were pretty scary. Her own background was quite tragic, involving a lonely childhood, struggles with anorexia, and alcoholism. Her relationship with her dog in her mid-thirties was the first in her life that felt authentic and satisfying.

    As a pretty fanatic animal lover myself, I identified with her devotion to her dog, and I enjoyed the book mostly. I only wish her life had been happier in other ways. She died several years after writing this book of lung cancer, and I can't help wondering what happened to Lucille when Caroline was no longer there to care for her. I can only hope a family member or friend has adopted the dog and continued to provide her with the love and devotion she had come to depend upon. We owe our animals that for the many gifts they give us.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • The Chequer Board

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Nevil Shute
    • Narrated By Paul Panting
    Overall
    (40)
    Performance
    (36)
    Story
    (36)

    John Turner, a young man with a chequered past, has been told he has just one year to live. He decides to use his remaining time to search of three very different men he met briefly during the war: a snobbish British pilot, a young corporal accused of murder, and a black G.I. accused of attempted rape. Along the way, Turner learns about forgiveness, tolerance, and second chances, and overcomes his fear of death.

    Jacqueline Curbishley says: "Dated? Not this one."
    "Another Treasure By This Author!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It seems that every book I read by this author is better than the ones before. That's probably not true since I have thoroughly enjoyed all of them, including this gem. So far I have never been disappointed and plan to listen to all that are recorded as audiobooks. Perhaps, if I can ever find time to sit down and actually read a print book, I'll delve into even those that are not.

    I am always sorry when I finish a Nevil Shute novel even though I compulsively listen as often and as long as I can which causes me to leave these wonderful characters sooner than I would like. And yet, each tale ends as it must and at the proper time. This one did as well.

    What a treasured legacy this author has left, for me at least!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Crocodile on the Sandbank: The Amelia Peabody Series, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Elizabeth Peters
    • Narrated By Barbara Rosenblat
    Overall
    (3088)
    Performance
    (1848)
    Story
    (1840)

    Amelia Peabody inherited two things from her father: a considerable fortune and an unbendable will. The first allowed her to indulge in her life's passion. Without the second, the mummy's curse would have made corpses of them all.

    Carrie says: "Nice break from the usual-"
    "Just For Fun!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book was just so much fun to listen to. I rarely give 5 stars for a purely recreational book--I want something more profound for that designation. But I made an exception here for this one. I simply enjoyed it that much even though this is not my favored genre. It made me laugh, and the ending was satisfying if predictable.

    I really liked Amelia even though I'm quite sure this character was unrealistic for an Englishwoman of the 1880s. I don't think the story or the characters were meant to be taken seriously or literally, so I didn't

    I'll probably read the next in the series and see where Amelia takes me. Just for fun. When I am looking for something light that will entertain and distract. Crocodile on the Sandbank was just what I needed this week.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • What the Dog Knows: The Science and Wonder of Working Dogs

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Cat Warren
    • Narrated By Cassandra Campbell
    Overall
    (57)
    Performance
    (51)
    Story
    (52)

    Cat Warren is a university professor and former journalist with an admittedly odd hobby: She and her German shepherd have spent the last seven years searching for the dead. Solo is a cadaver dog. What started as a way to harness Solo’s unruly energy and enthusiasm soon became a calling that introduced Warren to the hidden and fascinating universe of working dogs, their handlers, and their trainers.

    Rozellind says: "Super !"
    "Outstanding!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is probably the best book about dogs that I have read so far, and I have read quite a few. I hesitated with beginning What the Dog Knows probably because I knew that it was about a German Shepherd while my breed of choice is the Belgian Malinois. Casual observers often confuse the two breeds, but they are very, very different in temperament, drive, and even appearance. Most German Shepherds, especially those bred in the United States, appear bulky and slow to me compared to my driven, lithe and agile Malinois. But a respected friend, and owner of a Malinois, strongly recommended this book; I thank her for that.

    The author, Cat Warren, is a college professor with exceptional writing skills and a strong need to research her subject thoroughly. The combination made this book intellectually datisfying as well as enjoyable to read. While her main focus is on the training and deployment of her Cadaver dog, Solo, she also describes other working dogs and the trainers she worked with--Military Working Dogs, Search and Rescue dogs, and Law Enforcement canines. She trained with all of them to some extent and provided clear information on where they differ and what they have in common.

    I purchased a copy of What the Dog Knows for the trainer who works with us and our dogs on detection. He certainly doesn’t need the information since he has handled and trained working dogs for over 20 years, but he loves dogs and will enjoy this book. At the same time, I also ordered it for our very good friends who presently own, and have owned, a GSD. They love the breed, and think that our Malinois are more than a little crazy and frenetic. It’s the perfect book for them.

    It may also be a great read for you...if you love dogs and/or are interested in the world of working dogs and their trainers/handlers. I am so glad I read it myself. Thanks again, Kelsey, for the recommendation!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs)
    • By Jonas Jonasson
    • Narrated By Steven Crossley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2571)
    Performance
    (2305)
    Story
    (2322)

    After a long and eventful life, Allan Karlsson ends up in a nursing home, believing it to be his last stop. The only problem is that he's still in good health, and in one day, he turns 100. A big celebration is in the works, but Allan really isn't interested (and he'd like a bit more control over his vodka consumption). So he decides to escape. He climbs out the window in his slippers and embarks on a hilarious and entirely unexpected journey, involving, among other surprises, a suitcase stuffed with cash.

    Sylvia says: "Full of Surprises and Unexpected Events"
    "Amusing Romp Through the Past Hundred Years"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a book that people tend to love or hate. I enjoyed it for its understated humor and many historical references. I read it as a casual, amusing tale, and definitely saw the similarity with Forrest Gump mentioned in several reviews. It was fun. Nothing profound, simply a light commentary on much of the last hundred years of world history wrapped into an engaging adventure.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Chaser: Unlocking the Genius of the Dog Who Knows a Thousand Words

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By John W. Pilley, Hilary Hinzmann
    • Narrated By Peter Powlus
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (108)
    Performance
    (99)
    Story
    (101)

    Chaser has a way with words. She knows over a thousand of them—more than any other animal of any species except humans. In addition to common nouns like house, ball, and tree, she has memorized the names of more than one thousand toys and can retrieve any of them on command. Based on that learning, she and her owner and trainer, retired psychologist John Pilley, have moved on to further impressive feats, demonstrating her ability to understand sentences with multiple elements of grammar and to learn new behaviors by imitation.

    Elizabeth says: "Circle of life"
    "An Inspiring Way to Retire!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The information provided on Chaser and his ability to learn was very interesting to me personally. However, I found the positive influence this project had on the author, Johm Pilley, equally fascinating. Pilley did his extensive work with Chaser in his late 70s, and it is still continuing into his mid-80s. The research, as well as his incredibly strong relationship with his dog, have kept him physically, mentally, and spiritually energized. As a senior citizen who works with active large dogs, I find that very encouraging.

    This is a book worth reading for anyone interested in animal intelligence or simply in learning more about dogs as our companions--or both. I enjoyed it and admire Professor Pilley for his impressive dedication to his new career, furthering our understanding of canine language acquisition. In my opinion, he models the perfect "retirement." It sure beats sitting on a beach or lounging on the front porch. He is quite an inspiration.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Pied Piper

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Nevil Shute
    • Narrated By David Rintoul
    Overall
    (145)
    Performance
    (128)
    Story
    (130)

    John Howard is determined to brighten up his old age by taking a fishing trip to France, but during his stay the Nazis invade. Howard must try to escape back to England with the two small children of some friends who are forced to stay behind in order to help the Allied war effort. As the conflict grows closer, the roads become impassable and Howard also comes across five more children who need his help. He ends up leading this motley group of youngsters through the French countryside, constantly beset by danger yet heroically protecting his charges.

    Susan says: "One of My All Time Favorires"
    "Typical, Wonderful Novel by Nevile Shute"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I really love all of the books I've read by this author. He captures times that are gone forever. His style is understated and his novels, this one included, are peopled with decent, ordinary characters who are simply leading their lives according to a set of values. Even the invading, occupying Germans in are portrayed as human beings with families and loved ones they want to protect from the horrors of war; they are NOT sympathetic characters, merely complex as we all are.

    Pied Piper began slowly and built gradually which typical is Shute's style. I definitely plan to find more books by this author. They cause me to feel less jaded when I finish them. Quite the opposite of novels like Gone Girl where I felt I needed a shower from contact with those characters. The plot of this book is certainly as plausible as that one and far more encouraging to read.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944

    • UNABRIDGED (32 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Rick Atkinson
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (216)
    Performance
    (190)
    Story
    (196)

    In An Army at Dawn - winner of the Pulitzer Prize - Rick Atkinson provided a dramatic and authoritative history of the Allied triumph in North Africa. Now, in The Day of Battle, he follows the American and British armies as they invade Sicily in July 1943, attack Italy two months later, and then fight their way, mile by bloody mile, north toward Rome. The Italian campaign's outcome was never certain; in fact, President Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill, and their military advisors bitterly debated whether an invasion of the so-called soft underbelly of Europe was even wise.

    A User says: "The utter waste and horror of war..."
    "Hard to Listen to, but Very Worthwhile"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I needed to read this book. None of the history classes I took in high school or college ever discussed World War II; I’ve had to learn everything about it on my own over the years. After retiring for good five years ago, I decided to focus heavily on this major 20th century event through biographies, histories, and well-researched historical fiction. I also watched a number of documentaries which included "The War," "Band of Brothers," "The World at War," and "The Pacific" as well as all of the Extras found on the DVD sets. However, nothing I had previously seen, listened to, or read adequately covered the Italian theater. It appeared to be a rather neglected aspect of World War II, or at least it seemed so to me.

    When Rick Atkinson completed his The Liberation Trilogy on the war in Europe, I knew I had to read them all in order to piece together the European aspect of World War II. I discovered from "An Army at Dawn: The War in North Africa, 1942-1943" just how totally unprepared the United States had been when we entered this ongoing conflict--how we sent untrained troops and officers into the fray, and how much we learned through fighting with the British, against the Germans. But what of Sicily and Italy? What of the Italian Campaign?

    In this second volume, "The Day of Battle: the War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1945" I found out more than I had expected. The arrogance, huge tactical errors, and misjudgments of many of the generals caused unbelievable suffering and unnecessary death for our troops and those of our allies in this corner of the war. I knew it had been bad, but it’s hard to conceive just how horrendous it really was. No wonder this isn’t the part of WWII we hear much about! Of course we trumpet the successful landings at Normandy in 1944 rather than those that were so nearly repelled with terrible losses at Salerno in 1943. While the courage and perseverance of the men themselves was admirable, much that they were asked to do was stupid and hopeless to the point of being shameful. It was hard to listen to, really it was.

    The author provides intricate detail, often using just the precise word, to convey the taste, smell, and misery of this time and place. He portrays the major players as he sees them from from his thorough research of the archives, and sometimes it’s not flattering. He clearly admires Eisenhower, but is certainly less impressed with Clark and Montgomery. In the end this ultimate question looms large: Was the Italian Campaign necessary? Did it further the cause of victory in Europe by occupying a significant portion of Hitler’s resources? Or was it instead a colossal, pointless waste of men and material? Atkinson poses these questions at the end of this volume, leaving it to the reader for final judgement. I’m still pondering...these are not simple questions and perhaps they are unanswerable...

    ...but I needed to read this excellent and difficult book. It taught me much that is important for me to know. It also posed additional questions that will require more reading and rumination. I am certainly motivated to soon begin the last of this trilogy, "The Guns at Last Light, The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945." First, though, I think I’ll listen to some lighter, less intense fiction in order to clear my palate before taking another plunge into WWII.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Dynasty 2: The Dark Rose

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Cynthia Harrod-Eagles
    • Narrated By Nigel Graham
    Overall
    (31)
    Performance
    (31)
    Story
    (26)

    1501: the turbulence of Henry VIII's reign brings passion and pain to the Morlands as they achieve ever greater wealth and prestige.Paul, great-grandson of Elanor Morland, has inherited the Morland estates, and his own Amyas is set to be his heir. But Paul fathers a beloved illegitimate son, and bitter jealousy causes a destructive rift between the two half-brothers which will lead to death.

    N. Rogers says: "Enjoyable!"
    "Enjoyable!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I loved this second in a long series of historical novels placed in northern England near York! It continued the saga of the Morland family from 1501 into the reign of young King Edward after the death of his father, Henry VIII. I love this period of English history so following the Morlands through it was especially enjoyable. I hope the next in the series will continue with Elizabeth I since she is my very favorite of all the English monarchs.

    Others have summarized the plot of this novel so I will not repeat their efforts. This is a long book, a little over 21 hours on the audiobook, but I finished listening to it in less than 4 days. Although I do have a life, I found it difficult to take off my earphones and stop this story. I guess it’s a good thing that batteries do need to be recharged occasionally. I was even happy with the ending. I read the preceding book, but this one could stand on it’s own without losing much.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • On the Beach

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Nevil Shute
    • Narrated By Simon Prebble
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (182)
    Performance
    (164)
    Story
    (165)

    A war no one fully understands has devastated the planet with radioactive fallout from massive cobalt bombing. Melbourne, Australia, is the only area whose citizens have not yet succumbed to the contamination. But there isn’t much time left, a few months, maybe more—and the citizens of Melbourne must decide how they will live the remaining weeks of their lives, and how they will face a hopeless future.

    Julie says: "The most emotionally moving story I have ever read"
    "Personally a Tremendous Influence"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book profoundly influenced much of my life. I first read it while in high school and then again some time later. Now, after a lifetime, I listened to the audiobook. What struck me most from this most recent experience with the novel is the complete decency and sense of duty its characters displayed as they waited for a deadly inevitable cloud of radiation from nuclear war in the Northern Hemisphere to reach them in southern Australia. They clung to, or discovered, what meant most to them in their lives and continued to carry on in the face of the certain destruction of the human species. Contemporary readers may find their behavior implausible, but having grown up in the post WW II era, I see this as congruent with the values and character of that period.

    I was in college at the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis and vividly remember the sense of urgency I felt after President Kennedy’s now-famous speech where everything--my future and that of the entire world--was on the line. Afterwards I soberly rode the elevator up to my room from the dorm lounge where so many girls had watched and listened to grave and frightening announcements. Many of my companions were openly crying and beginning to despair. One of them turned to me and asked with great urgency, “What are you going to do?” I answered that I was going to study for the Sociology exam I was scheduled to take in the morning. She looked at me incredulously and exclaimed, “But we may be at war tomorrow!! We may all be dead!” I thought about her question and replied, “But we may NOT be at war, and if we are not, I will certainly have to take that exam. I can’t change anything out there, but I CAN continue with what I am here to do. I can be prepared for that test.”

    In retrospect, we all know what happened: there was no war, I took that exam, and I did pretty well on it. I learned from On the Beach, and from that Missile Crisis experience, that I needed to do my job, whatever that might be, and to do it to the best of my ability for the rest of my life regardless of what whirlwinds of craziness were swirling about me. The characters in this book knew they were going to die, and they knew when--a truly terrifying concept. Yet, as the book points out, we all know that that our condition is terminal. Our time here is finite; we each need to make ours the best, most productive, life we can, for ourselves and for those around us. There is so much that we cannot control, but we can govern ourselves. We can be true to our values as so many of Shute’s people were in this novel.

    Because I had grown up with air raid drills, “duck and cover,” under a constant threat of nuclear annihilation, this book spoke directly to me. It frightened me tremendously, but it also taught me some very important lessons that have remained an integral part of everything I have done since. Each day of life dawned with a strong sense of urgency, causing me to grasp exciting experiences and opportunities as they offered themselves. I never felt the luxury of letting them pass by perhaps for another time.

    Over these many years, I have experienced much change, both loss and gain. Some events and situations I could influence, while others I was utterly impotent to affect. I learned from this book, and from life, to direct most of my energy and efforts into those spheres where I could actually have impact, and to let the rest go by. For me this is the major lesson of On the Beach.

    The novel certainly may have also influenced those with the power to change global politics, leading them to actions which effectively avoided nuclear war and total annihilation of life as we know it on earth. That is unknowable. I only understand that, unlike the characters in On the Beach, I was granted a full life--basically a wonderful and somewhat unexpected gift.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • 14

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Peter Clines
    • Narrated By Ray Porter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (13258)
    Performance
    (12036)
    Story
    (12068)

    There are some odd things about Nate’s new apartment. Of course, he has other things on his mind. He hates his job. He has no money in the bank. No girlfriend. No plans for the future. So while his new home isn’t perfect, it’s livable. The rent is low, the property managers are friendly, and the odd little mysteries don’t nag at him too much. At least, not until he meets Mandy, his neighbor across the hall, and notices something unusual about her apartment. And Xela’s apartment. And Tim’s. And Veek’s.

    Charles says: "Completely Engaging"
    "Too Weird"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is truly a very weird book!! I usually don’t read things like “14,” but it appealed to me after I had listened to more than 40 hours of “Far From the Tree” which was pretty serious and often sad. By contrast this book is a fantasy/science fiction type, something I occasionally enjoy as a change. It certainly WAS a break from my norm, and I’m now more than ready to return to reality again, even in my choice of fiction--at least until George R.R. Martin manages to finish his sixth book in the “Song of Ice and Fire” series.

    There are a number summaries and analyses of the plot of “14” so won’t add another. It’s enough to say that I rather enjoyed the first three-quarters of the novel, but I only endured the ending. It just got too strange for me, and I couldn’t relate to either the characters or the story by then. It is like the TV series “Lost” in some ways. I found both compelling long enough that I stuck with them all the way, including their rather disappointing endings.

    In order for me to give a book more than three stars, I have to feel that I learned something proportional to the time I invested in it. Unfortunately this was not the case with “14”. However, unless I really dislike a book or hate it enough to not finish it, I rarely give less than three stars. So three stars it is for a fairly entertaining first three-quarters but a rather numbing last section and ending.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.