You no longer follow Shamu from New York

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Shamu from New York

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Shamu from New York

Interests in Design/Engineering, Architecture, & History

New York | Member Since 2012

17
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 12 reviews
  • 24 ratings
  • 205 titles in library
  • 25 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
1
FOLLOWERS
0

  • Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Matthew B. Crawford
    • Narrated By Max Bloomquist
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (340)
    Performance
    (147)
    Story
    (147)

    Shop Class as Soulcraft brings alive an experience that was once quite common but now seems to be receding from society - the experience of making and fixing things with our hands. For those who felt hustled off to college, then to the cubicle, against their own inclinations and natural bents, Shop Class as Soulcraft seeks to restore the honor of the manual trades as a life worth choosing.

    Nathaniel says: "A profound look at work, and what we've done to it"
    "wanted to enjoy it more, but it rang false"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    My reaction, put simply is - I can't tell if the author is trying to justify the merits of being a motorcycle mechanic to us or to himself. It's as if he started off overly in defense of his career choice, as if bitter of the lack of respect he feels people may hold for him because he is a mechanic, rather than a think tank academic. By the end, he just sounds very full of himself and rather intolerable. and the worst part? I more or less agree with what he's saying.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs)
    • By Brad Stone
    • Narrated By Pete Larkin
    Overall
    (972)
    Performance
    (858)
    Story
    (871)

    Amazon.com started off delivering books through the mail. But its visionary founder, Jeff Bezos, wasn't content with being a bookseller. He wanted Amazon to become the everything store, offering limitless selection and seductive convenience at disruptively low prices. To do so, he developed a corporate culture of relentless ambition and secrecy that's never been cracked. Until now.

    Brock says: "An amazing company with an amazing story!"
    "Did you know how bad it is to work for Amazon?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I love Amazon. Seriously. Amazon has improved my life. As a parent of young children, I spend no time driving to stores for diapers, I can shop late at night, I can get things cheap.

    Little did I know the "price of cheap." In order for Amazon to deliver the best prices, they've seemingly done almost everything on such a slim margin, you almost feel guilty as a customer for what is happening for their employees. From the Fulfillment Centers to the executive offices, everything is about being cheap and frugal to the point it's a bit disturbing how little I was aware of it : No air conditioning in a hot summer warehouse (although they would have an ambulance on hand for employees who suffer heat stroke) - Execs traveling in economy - sawhorse door desks - no free parking for employees - a boss that expects you to have no work/life balance - no unions... it goes on...

    I do appreciate how Jeff Bezos behaves as an agent of the consumer, fighting for the benefit of the consumer, but all the cheap stories made me feel like asking Jeff to not fight so hard, to just lay off and get his employees some air conditioning. It's like you call the police to arrest a guy who's stolen your car, only to have the police come and proceed to bludgeon the burglar to within inches of his life in front of your eyes. That's how it felt at times.

    This book does do a good job presenting the most successful .com retail company and charting the roots of its success, it serves as a role model for anybody seeking to understand the world of internet retailing through the lens of the biggest, baddest, internet retailer out there right now.

    10 of 16 people found this review helpful
  • Ingenious: A True Story of Invention, Automotive Daring, and the Race to Revive America

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Jason Fagone
    • Narrated By Adam Verner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (15)
    Performance
    (14)
    Story
    (14)

    In 2007, the X Prize Foundation announced that it would give $10 million to anyone who could build a safe, mass-producible car that could travel one hundred miles on the energy equivalent of a gallon of gas. The challenge attracted more than one hundred teams from all over the world, including dozens of amateurs. Many designed their cars entirely from scratch, rejecting decades of thinking about what a car should look like.

    Shamu from New York says: "Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels."
    "Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Yes, that headline's a quote from an Apple advertisement, but yet somehow fit so well to describe the cast of characters gathered in pursuit of creating a 100 mpge car. The book is extensively researched, the characters so finely presented, the passion so tangibly presented, you feel as if you are listening to a movie. I almost wonder how the author was so fortunate to have ring side seats for so many teams all the way from concepts to victory, and he does a great job following up post-competition as well.

    To put my opinion into perspective, I've been getting into design/engineering books lately, and I listened to the Steve Jobs bio, the Jony Ive bio, the story of the AK-47 and Glock, and books on Nikola Tesla.

    If you've enjoyed any of those books, you must listen to this one - this is the best non-fiction book on engineering and design that I have read, in part because the story remains about design, and not business success, for the simple reason that most of the teams spend vast sums of money and time and perhaps have little financial gain.

    The author's criticisms are fairly leveled at the X Prize Car competition itself, a competition which set out a difficult mission that ended up so demanding that at the end, only the crazy ones, the misfits and the rebels are the ones who remained. The prize asked for a 100 mpge car, and that's what they got, however it never was able to create an industry the way the first Space X Prize was able to generate corporate enthusiasm for space tourism. it does not seem there is much to show from the efforts of these people just yet. You'll feel that pain too, and yet still appreciate and respect their accomplishments.

    (While Tesla seems to be doing well right now, they were early withdrawals from the competition, and their initial approach of luxury vehicles is not the approach the X Prize competition was designed to cultivate.)

    This really is about dreamers. visionaries, because not all dreamers and visionaries will necessarily become financially successful or their full dream realized- and yet they'll still be out there, building their machines with passion that borders on religion.

    You can't help but be inspired in some way, perhaps to become motivated to do things you've dreamt of doing but for some reason never had. And what is a better reason to get a book than that.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Jony Ive: The Genius Behind Apple's Greatest Products

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Leander Kahney
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (262)
    Performance
    (234)
    Story
    (231)

    The best-selling author of Inside Steve's Brain profiles Apple's legendary chief designer, Jonathan Ive. Jony Ive's designs have not only made Apple one of the most valuable companies in the world; they've overturned entire industries, from music and mobile phones to PCs and tablets.

    Shamu from New York says: "Not an authorized bio - don't expect Isaacson"
    "Not an authorized bio - don't expect Isaacson"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I didn't know this wasn't an authorized biography. I did note that it was short in length, but I was eager to learn more about the lead designer at Apple.

    I got a long list of accomplishments and insight on what he did and what was done but bottom line is I still don't feel like I know what he's like as a human being. Even little facts - I would expect to be able to know things like, what was his starting salary at Apple? I did learn that he made something like 50 million once... but where did he start? What was his first meeting with Jobs like?

    There are some good observations - particularly I enjoyed the sequence of manufacturing iphones/imacs, detailing from the aluminum billet, the laser drilling, painting, etc. There are about 2 parts where the manufacturing detail is laid out. Apple doesn't disclose it, but it seems Kahney got some sources and also intuited some of it out. Painting, thermal expansion, tooling, properties of plastic vs glass vs aluminum, all of these are things I hadn't thought about.

    Very much missing are nice anecdotes, like the ones in Isaacson's "Steve Jobs," that could really give Ive a depth of character. If you read Isaacson's book, you might remember the bit about somebody seeing Steve in his Porsche shouting on the phone - "make it more ____ing BLUE!" or some other great tidbit that gave you insight into his character. Nothing there, and I missed it. For example, Ive and Rubenstein would yell at each other. What did they yell? did they curse? were they funny? No quotes. And then supposedly Rubenstein got fired by an ultimatum, "he goes or I goes," but that's delivered more as a hearsay rather than a direct quote.

    Anyway, it's an unauthorized bio on a guy who's really private so it's a tough task to tackle... that's why that's my headline.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By Sam Kean
    • Narrated By Sean Runnette
    Overall
    (2172)
    Performance
    (1384)
    Story
    (1387)

    Reporter Sam Kean reveals the periodic table as it’s never been seen before. Not only is it one of man's crowning scientific achievements, it's also a treasure trove of stories of passion, adventure, betrayal, and obsession. The infectious tales and astounding details in The Disappearing Spoon follow carbon, neon, silicon, and gold as they play out their parts in human history, finance, mythology, war, the arts, poison, and the lives of the (frequently) mad scientists who discovered them.

    Ethan M. says: "Excellent, if unfocused"
    "High School did a great job making Chemistry Suck"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I wish my chemistry teachers would have made me read this book. I would have had more interest in chemistry instead of regarding it as a hard and dry science with no humanity.

    I would love to find another book that will do what this did - take a scientific, informative subject, cover its history and developments and just make something that I struggled to understand in high school very interesting indeed. You won't learn about Avogadro (or whatever his name was) , or many other significant numbers that your teacher tried to beat into your head, but instead you'll learn about things like King Midas and spoons that melt in your tea, and fool's gold and isn't that already better than knowing how to identify chemical reactions? High school did a great job in making chemistry SUCK. This book, while it won't make you a chemist, might instead make you respect, admire, and appreciate it.

    I'm waiting for the sequel, "the Disappearing SPORK!"

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Business Stripped Bare: Adventures of a Global Entrepreneur

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Richard Branson
    • Narrated By Adrian Mulraney
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (179)
    Performance
    (96)
    Story
    (97)

    From its creation as a mail-order record company to the literal launch of Virgin Galactic, today Virgin is one of the premier ‘way-of-life’ brands in the world, trusted and enjoyed by many millions of people. In Business Stripped Bare, Sir Richard Branson shares the inside track on his life in business and reveals the incredible truth about his most risky, brilliant and audacious deals.

    Garrett says: "Eccentric read by an eccentric man."
    "He's rich and he likes to party..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    There are some good nuggets, some things you'll gain from this about the importance and respect towards safety, of being responsible and quick to respond, however there are also things that I'll probably remember even more because they seemed rather consistent - Branson seems to always think that to sell something, it just helps to get naked or have some other people get scantily clad. He may be right, he may be wrong, but it does get monotonous about the third time he mentions how getting attractive people to say and dress a particular way will sell. He may indeed be more of Brand-son most of the time, but it wasn't that bad of a listen. 3 stars.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Last Lecture

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Randy Pausch, Jeffrey Zaslow
    • Narrated By Erik Singer, Randy Pausch
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2240)
    Performance
    (682)
    Story
    (683)

    When Randy Pausch, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon, was asked to give such a lecture, he didn't have to imagine it as his last, since he had recently been diagnosed with terminal cancer. But the lecture he gave - "Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams" - wasn't about dying. It was about the importance of overcoming obstacles, of enabling the dreams of others, of seizing every moment (because "time is all you have... and you may find one day that you have less than you think").

    K. Giavelli says: "How to Live"
    "was expecting more"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Expected more inspiration, expected more insight. Some how this book didn't really move me nor inspire me to carpe diem. it rang more of a man's reflection on his great life.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Chris Kyle, Scott McEwan, Jim DeFelice
    • Narrated By John Pruden
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3083)
    Performance
    (2788)
    Story
    (2779)

    From 1999 to 2009, U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle recorded the most career sniper kills in United States military history. The Pentagon has officially confirmed more than 150 of Kyles kills (the previous American record was 109), but it has declined to verify the astonishing total number for this book. Iraqi insurgents feared Kyle so much they named him al-Shaitan ("the devil") and placed a bounty on his head.

    William says: "Rough and tumble Texas boy makes USA proud"
    "Preferred "No Easy Day""
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I had just listened to "No Easy Day" a few months ago and was in the mood for some non-fiction Navy SEAL action story. Chris Kyle had just been in the news, sadly, because he was killed and I thought I'd like to hear his story. This book serves more as a semi-bio, semi-life as Navy SEAL story (it even has many passages written from his wife's perspective), but it sadly does not serve as an interesting war story (even on more descriptive missions, it seems he scarcely goes into much detail beyond what he sees inside his scope so each mission reads something like, "then I set up my rifle and right away I see 3 bad guys. I love killing bad guys." - while that's great, it doesn't tell you much about the people he's protecting, what they were doing, and whether or not the mission succeeded.
    There's no epilogue on his murder, by the way.
    so in short, if you expect another "no easy day" this is not the book for you. If you're thinking, I am a bad ass and I want to be a Navy SEAL, what's that like for life and family, then maybe you'll get something out of this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Feast for Crows: A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 4

    • UNABRIDGED (33 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By George R. R. Martin
    • Narrated By Roy Dotrice
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (9562)
    Performance
    (8788)
    Story
    (8834)

    Few books have captivated the imagination and won the devotion and praise of readers and critics everywhere as has George R. R. Martin’s monumental epic cycle of high fantasy that began with A Game of Thrones. Now, in A Feast for Crows, Martin delivers the long-awaited fourth book of his landmark series, as a kingdom torn asunder finds itself at last on the brink of peace . . . only to be launched on an even more terrifying course of destruction.

    Pi says: "Jarring change in Dotrice's performance"
    "I think in the industry, they call this "FILLER""
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    If you have enjoyed the other books before this one, I think you'll be disappointed. Too much time spent on tertiary character development, noticeably intentional absence of popular interesting characters - this book is FILLER. It seems its main purpose is to just establish the passing of time in the world. Frankly, it's fine that the author has such a broad view of the world he has created, but there's an art in telling a tale and populating a story with 10000 characters doesn't make it better. (Of course if these other 3rd level characters become important I'll probably regret this)
    The narration is fine and talented.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Matterhorn: A Novel of the Vietnam War

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 10 mins)
    • By Karl Marlantes
    • Narrated By Bronson Pinchot
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4356)
    Performance
    (2512)
    Story
    (2513)

    Why we think it’s a great listen: A performance so poignant, we gave Bronson Pinchot (yes, Balki from Perfect Strangers) our inaugural Narrator of the Year award.... In the monsoon season of 1968-69 at a fire support base called Matterhorn, located in the remote mountains of Vietnam, a young and ambitious Marine lieutenant wants to command a company to further his civilian political ambitions. But two people stand in his way.

    Zachary says: "Matterhorn"
    "Great Narration - but a familiar story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    First off, the narrator for the book did a very good job, different voices were consistent and well developed. I enjoyed the book enough to listen to it pretty much straight and finished in 3-4 days, but couldn't help but think that I've seen some of this story before in some vietnam movies from the 80's and such. Judging from what I had heard, I had been hoping for a bit more along the lines of the Naked and The Dead or War and Peace, where some kind of more profound statement about the course of battle or a deeper sketch of characters would be underlying a overtone story of recent history.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.