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David

STAMFORD, CT, United States | Member Since 2012

7
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 18 reviews
  • 18 ratings
  • 57 titles in library
  • 9 purchased in 2014
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  • Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Ben Fountain
    • Narrated By Oliver Wyman
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (319)
    Performance
    (282)
    Story
    (284)

    A ferocious firefight with Iraqi insurgents at "the battle of Al-Ansakar Canal" - three minutes and forty-three seconds of intense warfare caught on tape by an embedded Fox News crew - has transformed the eight surviving men of Bravo Squad into America's most sought-after heroes. For the past two weeks, the Bush administration has sent them on a media-intensive nationwide Victory Tour to reinvigorate public support for the war. Now, on this chilly and rainy Thanksgiving, the Bravos are guests of America's Team, the Dallas Cowboys....

    Melinda says: "Oh-ooo Say, Can We See?"
    "Guys on Teams"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book just kept getting better. The novel takes place in one day, at one football game. The more I listened, the more surprises and turns of plot. The author has a great feel for 2004 and life in Texas and football and film agents and guys on teams and, yes, young love. The narrator was very strong, good with his characters' voices. I will read The Yellow Birds next, the other highly praised Iraq war novel--but this one was entertaining and insightful. Very sympathetic characters too.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Euphoria: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By Lily King
    • Narrated By Simon Vance, Xe Sands
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (98)
    Performance
    (85)
    Story
    (82)

    English anthropologist Andrew Bankson has been alone in the field for several years, studying the Kiona river tribe in the territory of New Guinea. Haunted by the memory of his brothers' deaths and increasingly frustrated and isolated by his research, Bankson is on the verge of suicide when a chance encounter with colleagues, the controversial Nell Stone and her wry and mercurial Australian husband, Fen, pulls him back from the brink. Nell and Fen have just fled the bloodthirsty Mumbanyo and, in spite of Nell's poor health, are hungry for a new discovery.

    Paula says: "Great Anthropological Story of Anthropologists"
    "Anthropologists in Love"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Euphoria presents a classic love triangle among three anthropologists in New Guinea between the world wars. The main charcter is Nell Stone, modeled after Margaret Mead, a free-thinking, insightful, deeply empathetic student of native cultures. Her husband Fen is her opposite, cynical, greedy and dismissive of local sentiments. Between them comes Bankson, the narrator, looking back years later on their brief time together in a small village, trying to control their lusts but not their ambitions. The story is well told, more absorbing and suspenseful as the book progresses. The author, like Nell, has a quick feel for other characters. Minor characters are well drawn with a few telling details. You especially feel for several of the villagers whose lives are changed by their observers.

    The audiobook has a serious flaw, namely, the drab narration by Simon Vance. Bankson should be an energetic, passionate, vibrant young force of nature, despite his failed suicide attempt at the novel's start. Instead, Vance reads as a depressed and weary old man. This drains the novel of much of its excitement. Xe Sands, reading as Nell Stone, is far better, with the right enthusiasm and wonder in her voice. Overall, however, this was an excellent book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • All Our Names

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Dinaw Mengestu
    • Narrated By Saskia Maarleveld, Korey Jackson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (19)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (19)

    All Our Names is the story of a young man who comes of age during an African revolution, drawn from the hushed halls of his university into the intensifying clamor of the streets outside. But as the line between idealism and violence becomes increasingly blurred, and the path of revolution leads to almost certain destruction, he leaves behind his country and friends for America. There, pretending to be an exchange student, he falls in love with a social worker and settles into the routines of small-town life. Yet this idyll is inescapably darkened by the secrets of his past....

    David says: "A Tale of Two Continents"
    "A Tale of Two Continents"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This was a beautifully written, thoughtful book about the very different lives taken for granted by natives of two continents, a troubled region in Africa and a complacent midwestern America. The story follows Isaac, an impoverished African who flees civil war to become a curious, lonely student in Illinois. He is befriended by the equally isolated social worker Helen, and they slowly build a relationship. The best chapters take place in Africa, during the student uprising that inspired Isaac's closest friend. But the most memorable scene takes place in a small-town American luncheonette. Isaac expects little, and in her own way Helen also has muted ambitions. There are many moving moments on both continents. And both narrators are excellent, with the right voices of tenderness and regret. A strongly recommended novel.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Three Brothers

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 33 mins)
    • By Peter Ackroyd
    • Narrated By Steven Crossley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    Three Brothers follows the fortunes of Harry, Daniel, and Sam Hanway, a trio of brothers born on a postwar council estate in Camden Town. Marked from the start by curious coincidence, each boy is forced to make his own way in the world - a world of dodgy deals and big business, of criminal gangs and crooked landlords, of newspaper magnates, backbiters, and petty thieves.

    David says: "London, Corrupt and Sour"
    "London, Corrupt and Sour"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Three Brothers portrays a world in which ambition and success lead only to misery. Of the three brothers, the oldest, Harry, makes his way in journalism through connections and by burying stories of corruption that would cause his boss financial problems. Daniel, the middle brother, becomes a professor and critic who is increasingly panicky about hiding his homosexuality. The youngest brother, Sam, has neither goals nor friends, but the author seems to regard his meekness as the greatest virtue. The brothers lose touch with each other early in the book, after their mother mysteriously abandons them. Their lives become three parallel but separate morality tales. The author is especially harsh on foreigners, like the South Indian Asher Roopta, a corrupt landlord. The book aims at a Dickensian flavor, with scenes at every level of society and with oddly named characters and coincidences. But even Dickens' most odious characters (Uriah Heep) were understandable, while Ackroyd's villains are cardboard targets. I confess that I enjoyed the book's first few chapters, until the author became increasingly bitter and his characters increasingly mean. Steven Crossley's narration was very good, as always.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Forcing the Spring: Inside the Fight for Marriage Equality

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Jo Becker
    • Narrated By Jamie Leonhart
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (12)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (12)

    A tour de force of groundbreaking reportage by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jo Becker, Forcing the Spring follows the historic legal challenge mounted against California’s ban on same-sex marriage, a remarkable lawsuit that forced the issue of marriage equality before the highest court in the land. For nearly five years Becker embedded with the lawsuit’s plaintiffs, was given free rein within the legal and political war rooms where strategy was plotted, and attended every day of the trial and every appellate argument.

    David says: "A stirring courtroom drama"
    "A stirring courtroom drama"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Jo Becker has written a compelling drama, tracing the history of the lawsuit that declared unconstitutional California's Proposition 8, revoking the right to gay marriage. The author has a nice ability to take complex legal concepts--heightened scrutiny, equal protection--and make them clear and understandable. More important, she has a great ear for detail, so the characters all come alive. She focuses on the four plaintiffs--Paul and Jeff, Chris and Sandy--and the depth of their feelings for each other, as well as the importance of the case to those within and outside the gay/lesbian community. She also conveys the hard work, strategic decisions and almost obsessive attention to the case by the key lawyers (mostly Ted Olson and David Boies, with troops of lawyers supporting them) and the public relations groups advising them. Becker highlights the opposition from "traditional" gay advocates, who lobbied to avoid a federal case as they moved forward state by state, for fear of moving too quickly. She also provides an entertaining summary of the parallel Edie Windsor case, which set aside the Defense of Marriage Act, and its legal team. The ending, which was of course covered by newspapers and TV, is quite moving. Overall, the book is filled with lively personalities, nicely drawn, in the context of a very significant civil rights case. The narrator had a light touch.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • At Night We Walk in Circles

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Daniel Alarcón
    • Narrated By Armando Durán
    Overall
    (27)
    Performance
    (26)
    Story
    (27)

    Nelson’s fate is slowly revealed through the investigation of the narrator, a young man obsessed with Nelson’s story - and perhaps closer to it than he lets on. In sharp, vivid, and beautiful prose, Alarcón delivers a compulsively readable narrative and a provocative meditation on fate, identity, and the large consequences that can result from even our smallest choices.

    David says: "Actors Have Consequences..."
    "Actors Have Consequences..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This melancholy novel focuses on a troop of three actors wandering in the Andean villages of an unnamed South American Country, performing a political play written by one of them years earlier called "The Idiot President." That play had gotten the playwright thrown into a vile, dangerous prison as a terrorist, and now the troop is reviving the play for small mountain audiences. But the novel focuses on Nelson, a lonely young actor who recently broke up with his girlfriend, who somewhat arbitrarily joins the other actors to play the "President's" son, and who suffers the consequences of others' selfishness.

    The novel surprises again and again. It is so unpredictable. And some moments are utterly chilling. But it's real charm lies in the mood it evokes, one of fatalism and resignation, one where you long for the characters to do the right thing or at least to overcome their circumstances. But again and again, it seems like no one is in charge and no one bears responsibility.

    The narration was very good, too.



    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Two Hotel Francforts: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By David Leavitt
    • Narrated By Stephen Bel Davies
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (16)
    Performance
    (16)
    Story
    (16)

    It is the summer of 1940, and Lisbon, Portugal, is the only neutral port left in Europe - a city filled with spies, crowned heads, and refugees of every nationality, tipping back absinthe to while away the time until their escape. Awaiting safe passage to New York on the SS Manhattan, two couples meet: Pete and Julia Winters, expatriate Americans fleeing their sedate life in Paris; and Edward and Iris Freleng, sophisticated, independently wealthy, bohemian, and beset by the social and sexual anxieties of their class.

    David says: "A Disappointment"
    "A Disappointment"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The novel is set in a milieu that is ripe for deep consideration of issues of war, home, bigotry, fascism and faith, namely, Lisbon in the late 1930s, a city filled with refugees fleeing Europe and trying to find new countries to accept them. But the novel focuses instead on four shallow, silly people who act like spoiled teenagers out of Gossip Girls. The narrator is a car salesman; the other couple write mystery novels under a pseudonym. The characters are disengaged from the war and nearly oblivious to the tragedies around them, both in Lisbon and in Europe. No doubt there were plenty of dull, disengaged people trying to leave Europe at that time, but it's not something worth reading about. The audiobook narrator had a good sense of voice for the characters.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Moth Smoke

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Mohsin Hamid
    • Narrated By Satya Babha
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (27)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (18)

    Through a brilliant array of voices and perspectives, author Mohsin Hamid tells the story of one love-struck Daru Shezad who, when fired from his banking job, instantly removes himself from the ranks of Pakistan's cell-phone-toting elite and plunges into a life of drugs and crime. But when a heist goes awry, Daru finds himself on trial for a murder he may or may not have committed.

    David says: "Young and Rich in Lahore"
    "Young and Rich in Lahore"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Moth Smoke presented a lively but disturbing portrait of life among the wealthy and privileged in Pakistan. The novel includes a Great Gatsby-like love triangle between the narrator, his best friend and the best friend's wife. The narrator, who is smart and handsome but whose background is less privileged than that of his friends, finds himself in increasing trouble as he tries to exercise the prerogatives of the young and rich without the means or connections. And despite the narrator's strong moral sense, he has a devastating sense of entitlement that ends up creating havoc in his life.

    The images of Lahore, with its disparities in wealth and its casual corruption, were informative. A favorite minor character was the narrator's young servant, who comes the closest to a moral center for the novel.

    The narration was well done, and the story easily holds up through the end. One drawback: The beginning, with allusions to Pakistani myths and an imagined courtroom scene, is hard to follow in audio. It's the kind of book you have to get in hard copy just to check out what was going on at the beginning. But then, as the novel flows, it gets easier to follow. Overall, a worthwhile and entertaining read.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Interestings

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Meg Wolitzer
    • Narrated By Jen Tullock
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1067)
    Performance
    (947)
    Story
    (952)

    The summer that Nixon resigns, six teenagers at a summer camp for the arts become inseparable. Decades later the bond remains powerful, but so much else has changed. In The Interestings, Wolitzer follows these characters from the height of youth through middle age, as their talents, fortunes, and degrees of satisfaction diverge. The kind of creativity that is rewarded at age 15 is not always enough to propel someone through life at age 30; not everyone can sustain, in adulthood, what seemed so special in adolescence.

    Tango says: "Needs a better title, but a good read (listen)"
    "More than Interesting"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This was a wonderfully written book, with pitch-perfect characterizations and a compelling plot. I found myself repeatedly surprised by the plot twists and the unexpected developments (like the way the characters' kids turned out). The underlying theme of the strength of relationships built as teenagers was fascinating--the relationships built in a couple of summers prove to be the most important relationships of these characters' lives, despite growth and marriage and fights and the rest. The narration was excellent, with subtle shifts in voice and tone to immediately identify the numerous characters, but without sliding into exaggeration. Minor characters were fun and well drawn, too--the camp founders, the Icelandic counselor, the folk singer. They all seemed real. Surprisingly, one of the most likeable characters was a husband who hadn't gone to camp and who wasn't artsy. He provided a nice contrast to the "Interestings." All in all, a beautiful novel.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Visible World

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Mark Slouka
    • Narrated By Glen McCready
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Mark Slouka’s novel begins with the child of Czech immigrants to the US, now living in New York, who has been brought up on the folklore of his parents’ homeland. As an adult he becomes aware that he has no knowledge of his parents during the Nazi occupation of Prague. He makes a journey back to Czechoslovakia and it is only then that he discovers their part in the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich, the notorious ‘butcher of Prague’ and begins to understand his mother Ivana’s unhappiness.

    David says: "Fear in Prague"
    "Fear in Prague"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Glen McCready was an ideal narrator for this factually based story of heroes and others in Czechoslovakia in World War II. The novel presents a young man, trying to understand his parents' relationship and their possible support for the Resistance in World War II. There is an ominous, almost menacing tone to McCready's narration, as the young man gets closer to his parents' history. Among the livelier scenes were those from the protagonist's boyhood in the US, surrounded by emigres from the postwar Czech world, so many trying to understand what had happened to their lost world. But there is a heaviness, too, as the book confronts the horrors of the war and the suffering of these sometimes sentimental emigres. Very well written and read.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Brothers: On His Brothers and Brothers in History

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By George Howe Colt
    • Narrated By David Drummond
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (12)
    Performance
    (12)
    Story
    (12)

    George Howe Colt believes that he would be an entirely different man had he not grown up in a family of four brothers. In Brothers, he movingly recounts the adoration, envy, rivalry, affection, anger, and compassion in their shifting relationships from childhood through middle age. In alternate chapters, Colt moves from a quest to understand how his own brothers shaped his life to an examination of the complex relationships between iconic brothers in history.

    Mark says: "Memoir combined with history"
    "All but the Karamazovs"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    George Howe Colt provides a masterful, well structured analysis of brotherly relationships. The book uses famous brothers to illustrate his themes: John Wilkes and Edwin Booth for "good brother, bad brother," the Kelloggs for sibling rivalry, the Van Goghs for "brother's keeper," etc. Most entertaining are the digressions about so many different brothers in history: Cain and Abel, Jacob and Esau (does God favor the younger brother, even if he's a trickster?), the Rothschilds, Lehmans, Kennedys, Nixons, Carters, Mayos, Melvilles, Jameses (Jesse and Frank; Henry and William), Joyces, Bellows, Emersons, Thoreaus...even Romulus and Remus and the Five Chinese Brothers in the old children's book. If you have a brother, you will love all of this.

    Alternate chapters tell the story of Colt's own brothers: how they grew and fought and looked out for each other. For those who grew up in the '50 and '60s, there are wonderful details about life back then. But ultimately, the Colts fade in comparison to the famous brothers profiled elsewhere.

    The narration is serviceable and professional, holding the listener's interest without drama. Overall, a very enjoyable book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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