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Jennifer

California

ratings
27
REVIEWS
10
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
22

  • The Language God Talks: On Science and Religion

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By Herman Wouk
    • Narrated By Bob Walter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (29)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (21)

    "More years ago than I care to reckon up, I met Richard Feynman." So begins The Language God Talks, Herman Wouk's gem on navigating the divide between science and religion. In one rich, compact volume, Wouk draws on stories from his life as well as on key events from the 20th century to address the eternal questions of why we are here, what purpose faith serves, and how scientific fact fits into the picture.

    Denise says: "Meh"
    "Ramblings of an Old Man"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A life-long devout Jew, Herman Wouk seeks to reconcile the unreconcilable. His narrative is anchored by three meetings with Richard Feynman wherein the physicist becomes increasingly interested in Wouk’s point of view. Wouk’s Feynman is not a consistent with the descriptions of others who knew him and seems to accept Wouk’s assertions without the questions one would expect a scientist to ask. As for his own faith, Wouk seems more to embrace the traditions of his upbringing and heritage than to articulate a certainty in the existence of the God engaged in the lives of his creations.

    Savoring his major works and the resulting adulation, Wouk too often drifts to topics unrelated to either science or religion. He is a good writer and his ramblings provide a pleasant, though somewhat incoherent, diversion.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Rapt: Attention and the Interested Life

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Winifred Gallagher
    • Narrated By Laural Merlington
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (207)
    Performance
    (51)
    Story
    (52)

    In Rapt, acclaimed behavioral science writer Winifred Gallagher makes the argument that the quality of your life largely depends on what you choose to pay attention to and how you choose to do it. Gallagher grapples with provocative questions - Can we train our focus? What's different about the way creative people pay attention? Why do we often zero in on the wrong factors when making big decisions? - driving us to reconsider what we think we know about attention.

    Roy says: "The Neuroscience of Concentration"
    "Monkey Mind Account of Mindfulness"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Who we are and how are is largely shaped by where we focus, where we invest our attention. Although our minds are naturally (and often strongly) drawn to the dangerous and the novel, we have the ability to influence our focus. With or without intentional choice, attending to one aspect of our physical and mental environment causes us to ignore others.

    Rather than making a coherent case for where we should place our attention under what circumstances and providing techniques for controlling that attention, the author provides a journalist’s survey of the scientific work being done in the area. A sprinkling of nineteenth century philosophy provides some context, but we are left with little more than the general idea that attending to the right things will make us happier.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Autobiography of a Yogi

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Paramahansa Yogananda
    • Narrated By Ben Kingsley
    Overall
    (902)
    Performance
    (415)
    Story
    (416)

    When Autobiography of a Yogi first appeared in 1946, it was acclaimed as a landmark work in its field. The New York Times hailed it as "a rare account". Newsweek pronounced it "fascinating". The San Francisco Chronicle declared, "Yogananda presents a convincing case for yoga, and those who 'came to scoff' may remain 'to pray." Today it is still one of the most widely read and respected books ever published on the wisdom of the East.

    D says: "Spiritually Uplifting -- and entertaining!"
    "Gurus, Disciples, and Saints! Oh, My!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Paramahansa Yogananda’s book is an excellent and very approachable introduction to Hindu mysticism. Having both read the kindle edition and listened to the audio version, I highly recommend Ben Kingsley’s reading of this classic story.

    That said, this autobiography is not a literary or historical work; it is a scriptural work. As such, it’s mission is to persuade the reader regarding the nature of ultimate reality and how the reader might best approach that reality. However well written, it must be subjected to the same scrutiny as any persuasive writing.

    The narrative structure resembles that of the gospels, charting the life of an exceptional holy man from childhood. Along the way, he encounters supernatural beings and both observes and performs miracles. With the greatest respect for Yogananda’s work as a community organizer bringing the religious perspective of India to the west, I have four specific objections to his assertions:

    1. Like other yogis, Yogananda presents his religious views as “science,” which they are not. There may be some scientific evidence that meditation contributes to a positive outlook (this has certainly been my experience), but there is none to substantiate the existence of the subtle body or the astral plane of existence.

    2. The effort to present Christianity as a subset of the Hindu religion is strained. Are we really to demote Jesus to the status of a prophet and accept Yogananda equivalent?

    3. The accounts of of siddhas (saints) and their siddhis (paranormal powers) would have us believe that there were saints in every neighborhood of Calcutta (and by extension in India). These are not ancient reports, and if such saints and powers were as frequent as the story implies, we ought certainly to have had numerous and continuing reports from other sources.
    4. The detailed description of the astral planet to which Sri Yukteswar ascended is not consistent with historical yogic writings.

    The book is certainly worth hearing and the philosophical musings about universal brotherhood and non-violence should be taken seriously, but this reader requires a bit more evidence before embracing Yogananda’s view of reality.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Douglas Adams
    • Narrated By Stephen Fry
    Overall
    (5332)
    Performance
    (2952)
    Story
    (2974)

    Seconds before the Earth is demolished to make way for a galactic freeway, Arthur Dent is plucked off the planet by his friend Ford Prefect, a researcher for the revised edition of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy who, for the last 15 years, has been posing as an out-of-work actor.

    John says: "HHTGH - Lightly Fried"
    "Entertaining"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A fun listen that requires a greater suspension of disbelief than most "science fiction." Definitely a good road trip choice.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Peter the Great: His Life and World

    • UNABRIDGED (43 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Robert K. Massie
    • Narrated By Frederick Davidson
    Overall
    (348)
    Performance
    (269)
    Story
    (265)

    This superbly told story brings to life one of the most remarkable rulers––and men––in all of history and conveys the drama of his life and world. The Russia of Peter's birth was very different from the Russia his energy, genius, and ruthlessness shaped. Crowned co-Tsar as a child of ten, after witnessing bloody uprisings in the streets of Moscow, he would grow up propelled by an unquenchable curiosity, everywhere looking, asking, tinkering, and learning, fired by Western ideas.

    Susan says: "detailed history"
    "Fresh Perspective on European History"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Robert K. Massie more than delivers on the promising title of this sweeping book. Massie presents an intense man with the vision, the autocratic means, and the personal perseverance to pull his nation into the modern world. Fascinating detours include descriptions of the histories of the powers with which Peter the Great interacts, summaries of the international issues that concerned them, and descriptions of the social and economic conditions of the day. Presented from the perspective of Eastern Europe, the early eighteenth century becomes something more than British and French concern over the Spanish succession. The end of this lengthy exposition left me longing for more.

    The excellence of Massie???s prose was unfortunately undermined by Frederick Davidson???s pompous reading. I would have expected a professional narrator to moderate his non-standard pronunciation of words like clerk (not clark) and issue (not issssssue). More egregiously, Davidson seems wholly incapable of providing character voices for quotations: even Peter the Great is rendered in a child-like, even effeminate, falsetto.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Origin of Species

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 10 mins)
    • By Charles Darwin
    • Narrated By David Case
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (238)
    Performance
    (71)
    Story
    (72)

    One of the most famous and influential books of its (or any) time, The Origin of Species is, surprisingly, little read. True enough, most people know what it says, or think they do, at any rate. The first comprehensive statement of the theory of natural selection, it does, indeed, provide the basic argument and demonstration of what we think of as Darwinism.

    William L says: "I loved it"
    "An Essential Listen"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Darwin changed the way we think about the world. Written in the dense, lightly-punctuated style of the nineteenth century, his book is difficult to read. Fortunately, David Case provides the vocal punctuation needed to make this impressive work accessible.

    Darwin's central thesis is that "As many more individuals of each species are born than can possibly survive; and as, consequently, there is a frequently recurring struggle for existence, it follows that any being, if it vary however slightly in any manner profitable to itself, under the complex and sometimes varying conditions of life, will have a better chance of surviving, and thus be NATURALLY SELECTED. From the strong principle of inheritance, any selected variety will tend to propagate its new and modified form."

    Charles Darwin argues against the commonly held notion that species were ???individually created??? by pointing to the effectiveness of ???methodical selection??? in modifying plants and animals under domestication. Although nineteenth century scientists knew little about the mechanism of inheritance, they knew one existed and how to use it to select for desirable attributes. Darwin asserts that,
    1. In the ???economy of nature,??? all creatures compete for the scarce resources that enable them to survive and procreate.
    2. Reproduction introduces small, but random, changes to the traits of individuals.
    3. If those random changes are favorable, the individual is more likely to survive and procreate (thereby preserving the change in future generations).
    4. Thus, complex changes are due to ???the slow and gradual accumulation of slight, but profitable, variations??? over a very long interval of time.

    Although Darwin refers to his book as an ???abstract,??? he provides extensive detailed examples based on his own work and numerous authorities known to him. His refutes numerous arguments against evolution by pointing to the paucity of the geological record and demonstrating the importance of traits that do not appear to be related to survival or procreation.

    Although I cannot claim to have followed every strand of his complex reasoning, I am impressed with his comprehensive approach to identifying and addressing potential objections to his theory. I am also impressed with his scrupulous citation of sources from which his data comes.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Atlas Shrugged

    • UNABRIDGED (63 hrs)
    • By Ayn Rand
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    Overall
    (5228)
    Performance
    (3199)
    Story
    (3211)

    In a scrap heap within an abandoned factory, the greatest invention in history lies dormant and unused. By what fatal error of judgment has its value gone unrecognized, its brilliant inventor punished rather than rewarded for his efforts? In defense of those greatest of human qualities that have made civilization possible, one man sets out to show what would happen to the world if all the heroes of innovation and industry went on strike.

    Mica says: "Hurt version decidedly superior"
    "The Anti-Communist Manifesto"
    Overall

    Ayn Rand???s mid-fifties parable about the loss of individual rights resonates through the decades. It is a big book with big characters who have big ideas. The line between good (individualism) and evil (collectivism) is clearly drawn. The good guys are clear-eyed and attractive; they spartan in both body and speech. The bad guys are slack-jawed, have soft bodies, and tend to babble. Scott Brick???s narration reflects the tone of the story, making it an enjoyable listen.

    The purpose of the story is to illustrate a philosophy that is summarized in Galt???s three-hour speech, which is the least enjoyable, the least realistic, and most important part of the book. Since it appears at the end of Part 7, you can skip through it easily. Whether you listen to the speech or not, it is the portion of the book that begs to be read and analyzed. I encourage you to download it from the web and parse it into assumptions, assertions, and conclusions.

    Ayn Rand???s philosophy rests on the notion that individuals must decide matters for themselves and that disagreements are due to differences in the premises on which their conclusions are based. If you accept her conclusion that laissez-faire capitalism is the ideal economic system, make sure that you understand the premises on which that conclusion is based. Would you fare better if the bankers who brought you the housing crisis were wholly unfettered? How effectively would Rand???s industrialists function without a public educational system (which is not within the scope of her limited government)? Who would build the roads or inspect the food supply?
    Atlas Shrugged is an important book that should be read (or listened to) by anyone concerned about the role of government in the lives of its citizens. However, the listener does Rand a disservice by accepting her views rather than making a conscious and personal judgement about the philosophy she presents.

    4 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Forged: Writing in the Name of God - Why the Bible's Authors Are Not Who We Think They Are

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 44 mins)
    • By Bart D. Ehrman
    • Narrated By Walter Dixon
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (417)
    Performance
    (297)
    Story
    (296)

    It is often said, even by critical scholars who should know better, that “writing in the name of another” was widely accepted in antiquity. But New York Times bestselling author Bart D. Ehrman dares to call it what it was: literary forgery, a practice that was as scandalous then as itis today. In Forged, Ehrman’s fresh and original research takes readers back to the ancient world, where forgeries were used as weapons by unknown authors to fend off attacks to their faith and establish their church.

    Robert says: "Good Info"
    "Not Quite Inerrant"
    Overall

    This is a book that needs an open-minded reading (or hearing) from every Christian who claims that those who disagree with their views have simply failed to open their heart and mind to the Holy Spirit.
    Although certain of books of the Bible claim to report divine revelations, the Bible makes no overall claim of its own inerrancy. Most people agree that the Bible was written by many authors at many different times. Decisions about which writings qualify as scripture was made long after the lifetimes of the authors. This is true of the Old Testament as well as the New; though this book focuses on the later.

    Bart Erhman presents a clear and compelling case for the proposition that traditional understanding of who wrote the books of the New Testament is incorrect and that many of them include false authorship claims (which makes them forgeries). Use of this highly pejorative (though entirely accurate) descriptor serves to pull the reader out of the complacency with which the uncertain authorship of the text is often approached. Acknowledging that we do not have original texts of any of these writings, Ehrman points to the oldest of the surviving copies to conclude that they were well educated in Greek, not the Aramaic-speaking disciples with first-hand knowledge of Jesus that they claimed to be. Additionally, they address theological issues that arose decades, if not centuries, after the death of their purported authors.

    Ehrman does not limit his analysis to those books included in the New Testament canon; he also reviews writings that were rejected expressly because they were thought to be forgeries. His conclusion is unavoidable: applying the same standards of veracity to biblical texts as we would to any other work, we cannot accept the teachings of much (but not all) of the New Testament.

    13 of 17 people found this review helpful
  • Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Mary Roach
    • Narrated By Sandra Burr
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1645)
    Performance
    (899)
    Story
    (891)

    Space is a world devoid of the things we need to live and thrive: air, gravity, hot showers, fresh produce, privacy, beer. Space exploration is in some ways an exploration of what it means to be human. How much can a person give up? How much weirdness can they take? What happens to you when you can’t walk for a year? Have sex? Smell flowers? What happens if you vomit in your helmet during a space walk? Is it possible for the human body to survive a bailout at 17,000 miles per hour?

    Roy says: "Everything You Always Wanted to Know - and More"
    "Not Really About Mars"
    Overall

    The title implies a look at what needs to be done to send a manned mission to Mars, a subject barely skirted in this often-entertaining historical summary of the challenges of weightless travel in confined space. Mary Roach explores the difficulties of eating, defecating, and mating in a zero-gravity environment with the excessive enthusiasm of your typical middle schooler. I would have preferred a little less discussion of how pornography has depicted zero-gravity sex and a little more discussion of how artificial gravity might be generated or why it would be impractical to do so. A discussion of speed limitations and alternative launch strategies might also have enhanced the book.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk: A Modest Bestiary

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs)
    • By David Sedaris
    • Narrated By David Sedaris, Dylan Baker, Elaine Stritch, and others
    Overall
    (1115)
    Performance
    (507)
    Story
    (505)

    Featuring David Sedaris's unique blend of hilarity and heart, this new collection of keen-eyed animal-themed tales is an utter delight. Though the characters may not be human, the situations in these stories bear an uncanny resemblance to the insanity of everyday life.

    Patricia says: "Enjoyable Book"
    "Occasionally Gruesome"
    Overall

    Most of these stories are pleasant little allegories, but the tender-hearted might want to skip the one about the bear and the one about the crow.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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