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Patrick

The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.

ratings
55
REVIEWS
51
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
10
HELPFUL VOTES
57

  • Breath Sweeps Mind

    • ORIGINAL (6 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By Jakusho Kwong-roshi
    Overall
    (140)
    Performance
    (69)
    Story
    (63)

    With more than 40 years of experience practicing traditional Zen, Jakusho Kwong-roshi removes some of the mystery surrounding this enigmatic philosophy through clear instruction in its core principles and how it relates to our everyday world, including methods of zazen meditation, why delusion is inseparable from enlightenment, turning our light inward, and more.

    Oskar's Mom says: "I loved it"
    "You're better off finding a podcast about Buddhism"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is basically a recording of a guy giving a lecture about maintaining positive thinking. Which I don't have a problem with, but it reminded me of a basic podcast (which are free btw) I can't say I gained anything from this but maybe it just wasn't my style either. I stopped it within listening to a few chapters and regretted spending my Audible credit on what could easily be put into a podcast category.

    4 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Jerry Lee Lewis: His Own Story

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Rick Bragg
    • Narrated By John Pruden
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    A monumental figure on the American landscape, Jerry Lee Lewis spent his childhood raising hell in Ferriday, Louisiana, and Natchez, Mississippi; galvanized the world with hit records like "Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On" and "Great Balls of Fire", that gave rock and roll its devil’s edge; caused riots and boycotts with his incendiary performances; nearly scuttled his career by marrying his 13-year-old second cousin - his third wife of seven - and ran a decades-long marathon of drugs, drinking, and women.

    Patrick says: "An Unsparing Portrait of a Southern Kinsman"
    "An Unsparing Portrait of a Southern Kinsman"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    When I was a child, I used to pretend I was Jerry Lee Lewis and would blast his music next to the piano. I couldn't play like him but it was fun to imagine. That's what comes to mind when I think of the great Jerry Lee. Just looking at the cover of this book gives an impression of a rebel who couldn't care less of what you or I thought of him.

    The fiery pianist is known for his hard living and tumultuous personal life. With his fans rolling down the highway with their windows down and their elbows sticking out listening to the euphoric beats of a new age.

    This book reflects on the life that he lived, and that his mama and daddy lived - clawing their way to some existence and hoping that Jerry Lee's talent would carry them. Bragg gets Lewis to relive some really awful things, hilarious things, and other things I thought were awful that turned out to be hilarious.It's a little bit what I imagined riding one of those mechanical bucking bulls would be like drunk, with one arm tied behind your back. It was interesting. Jerry Lee Lewis feeling his way back down through the past is like blindly going through a hallway lined with razor blades.

    His whole a torture chamber of his own making. If Jerry Lee Lewis lived in hell, he will look you right in the eye and tell you he lived in a worldly hell of his own making.The most difficult thing was that often a story would end in a very Southern Gothic way. He buried a lot of people that he cared about, that he loved. If you live to be 80 years old, then you're going to bury a lot of people. But he buried people that went far too soon. Two sons just to begin with. That was the first thing. There is tragedy and there is tragedy as Jerry Lee Lewis. But not one time did he lie there and really feel sorry for himself that I can recall.

    Lewis recalls the cruelty of the Great Depression, his daddy climbing into the rafters to beat to death a writhing knot of rattlesnakes that had been lifted there by the flood waters.He talks about playing the piano and wearing the ivory off the keys, literally, in the Pentecostal church. One of the most interesting topics was about Sun Records and making Elvis cry.

    Jerry Lee's adventure was so real, it was something that lived with him and never left. There are very few dull moments in this book, very few where I think I looked at my watch.

    Overall: The writing is excellent. I'm now a Rick Bragg fan. Narration was pretty good, lots of different character voices to go with the moments. I highly recommend for any music fan who want's to see the rocky road to stardom...and tragedy too.

    If this review helped you please click the button below...thanks.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Metamorphosis

    • UNABRIDGED (2 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Franz Kafka
    • Narrated By Ralph Cosham
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (369)
    Performance
    (331)
    Story
    (332)

    “One morning, as Gregor Samsa was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bug.” With this startlingly bizarre sentence, Kafka begins his masterpiece, The Metamorphosis. It is the story of a young traveling salesman who, transformed overnight into a giant, beetle-like insect, becomes an object of disgrace to his family, an outsider in his own home, a quintessentially alienated man. Rather than being surprised at the transformation, the members of his family despise it as an impending burden upon themselves.

    Patrick Weldon says: "Kafka-esque terrific"
    "Quite a Strange Little Book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Translated from German, The Metamorphosis is the story of how Gregor Samsa's transformation tears his family apart. I feel like there are hidden meanings that are just beyond my grasp. I suspect it's a commentary about how capitalism devours its workers when they're unable to work or possibly about how the people who deviate from the norm are isolated. However, I mostly notice how Samsa's a big frickin' beetle and his family pretends he doesn't exist.

    The main thing that sticks out is what a bunch of jerks Samsa's family are. He's been supporting all of them for years in his soul-crushing traveling salesman job and now they're pissed that they have to carry the workload. Poor things. It's not like Gregor's sitting on the couch drinking beer while they're working. He's a giant damn beetle! Cut him some slack.

    Overall: The narration was good, although the writing was a little confusing at times. This has a lot of hidden symbolism , and might take a few listens to uncover.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • 600 Hours of Edward

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Craig Lancaster
    • Narrated By Luke Daniels
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1013)
    Performance
    (931)
    Story
    (932)

    A 39-year-old with Asperger’s syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder, Edward Stanton lives alone on a rigid schedule in the Montana town where he grew up. His carefully constructed routine includes tracking his most common waking time (7:38 a.m.), refusing to start his therapy sessions even a minute before the appointed hour (10:00 a.m.), and watching one episode of the 1960s cop show Dragnet each night (10:00 p.m.). But when a single mother and her nine-year-old son move in across the street, Edward’s timetable comes undone....

    Lulu says: "A Very Good Book with a Very Difficult Hero"
    "600 Hours of Bland"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    It was very repetitive and very unenlightening about Asperger's. I understand that was the point but there were moments in this book I felt like I was slogging through.

    It seemed as though a majority is devoted to main character's thoughts on the Dallas Cowboys and Dragnet, and with no relevancy to the overall story. If you end of up reading this, skip these parts. Trust me.

    It's as if the author was just filling this book with lots of fluff while skipping around the main subject. I guess the reviewers who really liked this book are more patient than I am.

    The narrator fits the character well. He did a good job.

    Overall: Extremely repetitive and not much to keep the attention of those readers who want their authors to get to the point, rather than skirt around and tease the reader.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Elephant Whisperer: My Life with the Herd in the African Wild

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By Lawrence Anthony, Graham Spence
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1581)
    Performance
    (1445)
    Story
    (1457)

    >When South African conservationist Lawrence Anthony was asked to accept a herd of "rogue" wild elephants on his Thula Thula game reserve in Zululand, his common sense told him to refuse. But he was the herd's last chance of survival: they would be killed if he wouldn't take them. In order to save their lives, Anthony took them in. In the years that followed he became a part of their family. And as he battled to create a bond with the elephants, he came to realize that they had a great deal to teach him about life, loyalty, and freedom.

    Tango says: "Beautiful story, beautifully written"
    "Animals, Nature, and Incredible True Stories"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a fantastic book about some of nature's most beautiful and amazing animals. Anthony does a magnificent job of sharing his story of settling a herd of seven wild elephants on his 5,000 acres of bush in Zululand, South Africa. I respect his decision to try to extend the reserve to include the neighboring tribal land so that a greater number of wild animals might live comfortably without interference. The elephants get the credit they deserve for being remarkably intelligent and resilient, despite extremely harsh treatment and bad memories early on.

    The book makes the reader feel as though they're experiencing the African bush with the rangers and animals over the period of time. It's wonderfully energizing and one hates to leave their company at the end.

    The narrator Simon Vance is one of my top favorites. Excellent job on this project.

    Overall: Upon finishing this book, one feels quite as though one is losing a friend. Anthony is not simply an elephant whisperer, but fortunately a man who spoke to us, too.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • I Can See Clearly Now

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Wayne W. Dyer
    • Narrated By Wayne W. Dyer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (377)
    Performance
    (330)
    Story
    (336)

    For many years, Dr. Wayne W. Dyer’s fans have wondered when he would write a memoir. Well, Wayne has finally done just that! However, he has written it in a way that only he can - with a remarkable take-home message for his longtime followers and new readers alike - and the result is an exciting new twist on the old format. Rather than a plain old memoir, Wayne has gathered together quantum-moment recollections.

    char says: "Not seeing so clear"
    "A Bit Self-Congratulatory"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This was written with far too much ego involved for my liking. Many spiritual teachers can speak without using the word "I" continuously. Dr. Dyer's lack of humility detracted from his teachings.I found this book to be a trumpeting, self-congratulatory memoir, from a man who claims to have left ego behind.

    Overall: The subtitle of this book should be "Ain't I Great?"

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Code Talker: The First and Only Memoir by One of the Original Navajo Code Talkers of WW II

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Chester Nez, Judith Schiess Avila
    • Narrated By David Colacci
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (594)
    Performance
    (513)
    Story
    (523)

    Chester Nez, the only surviving member of the original twenty-nine Navajo code talkers, shares the fascinating inside story of his life and service during World War II.

    Roxane says: "Interesting Listen for WWII Buffs"
    "It Just Felt Flat"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    One of those "as told to" efforts, where Chester Nez, a 90-something last surviving member of the original group of 30 Navajo code talkers, gives an oral history to the author, who whips it into a first-person story of his life.

    Chester Nez's life is a great story, but it's not really well delivered in this memoir. The writing was mediocre, and I kept thinking back to the introduction, when his co-writer admits that many of the details don't match the historical record. She admits that she just accepts many of his recollections as fact. Now I don't blame him for not accurately remembering details from 70 years ago. I can't even remember what I had for lunch some days.

    Overall: pretty interesting read -- he doesn't try to make himself out to be a hero, just someone trying to do the right thing and make his family and the Navajos proud -- which he certainly did. I wish his memoir had been written by a better skilled writer.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 23 mins)
    • By Alfred Lansing
    • Narrated By Simon Prebble
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2580)
    Performance
    (1885)
    Story
    (1894)

    In August of 1914, the British ship Endurance set sail for the South Atlantic. In October, 1915, still half a continent away from its intended base, the ship was trapped, then crushed in the ice. For five months, Sir Ernest Shackleton and his men, drifting on ice packs, were castaways in one of the most savage regions of the world.

    Thomas says: "The best book I've had"
    "Interesting...But A Little Mundane"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I thought it was a very good story-line but the way it was written didn't seem to capture my attention as much as I had hoped. The story itself is remarkable. It's truly unbelievable what Shackleton and his men went through. However, it was disappointing as a book. It was a strict telling of the story. No interpretation, no broader context, no clues as to what made these men the kinds of people that could endure so much. It was simply a story of survival, without any stab at the deeper meaning or purpose for it. I would love to see someone like Jon Krakauer write a treatment of Shackleton's story.

    I really liked the narrator Simon Prebble, he did an excellent job.

    Overall: Believe me I tried to like this book, but it's bogged down in way too much detail and somehow makes a remarkable adventure story, boring and tedious.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big: Kind of the Story of My Life

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Scott Adams
    • Narrated By Patrick Lawlor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (572)
    Performance
    (530)
    Story
    (534)

    Scott Adams has likely failed at more things than anyone you’ve ever met or anyone you’ve even heard of. So how did he go from hapless office worker and serial failure to the creator of Dilbert, one of the world’s most famous syndicated comic strips, in just a few years? In How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big, Adams shares the strategy he has used since he was a teen to invite failure in, to embrace it, then pick its pocket.

    VyTri says: "Sucess advice from a cartoonist!"
    "A Mix of Memoir and Advice"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    There are some core aspects in our lives that Adams lays out that need attention in order for us to find our success. Adams believes that you need to tend to the groundwork for success by tending to your mind and body so as to allow yourself and your own set of talents and strengths to surface and flourish. Success is not easy but it's achievable...for anyone.

    Adams provides a set of skills and areas of knowledge towards which he thinks we should all vow a lifetime commitment to honing, learning, and mastering. These make up a manageable and sensible list that will help in dealing with life and other people.

    Overall the book is a bit of pleasant New Year's Resolution-type reading; nothing new but not the worst of it's genre either. I think there are some better books like this out there, so keep looking before you settle on this one.

    The narration was decent, but nothing to brag about.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Last Battle

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Cornelius Ryan
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    Overall
    (239)
    Performance
    (224)
    Story
    (224)

    The Battle for Berlin was the culminating struggle of World War II in the European theater. The last offensive against Hitler’s Third Reich, it devastated one of Europe’s historic capitals and marked the final defeat of Nazi Germany. It was also one of the war’s bloodiest and most pivotal battles, whose outcome would shape international politics for decades to come.

    GB says: "Thanks to Dan Carlin of Hardcore History podcasts."
    "Stands Near the Top of WW2 Books"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Wow! This book was really interesting. What stood out of the book for me, was a certain humanizing of the German people that won't be covered in most WW2 books out there. I thought the author did a good job of telling the Battle of Berlin from different viewpoints and not the American, Russian, or the Nazis, but rather a combination of all the sides. There is no easy way to put to words something with such enormity as the last battle in the deadliest military conflict in history. Yet, Cornelius Ryan manages to do just that not with the use of staggering statistics, but with a series of stories that even my simple human mind can comprehend.

    The narrator, Simon Vance, has become one of my favorites & his reading of this book makes you feel as is you're "watching" a documentary. Excellent.

    Overall: Doesn't require vast knowledge of WW2 & the stories throughout will keep you listening. I highly recommend for those with even a mild interest on the subject, & of course the usual military history buffs as well.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Practicing Mindfulness: An Introduction to Meditation

    • ORIGINAL (12 hrs and 33 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Mark W. Muesse
    Overall
    (506)
    Performance
    (442)
    Story
    (431)

    Meditation offers deep and lasting benefits for mental functioning and emotional health, as well as for physical health and well-being. These 24 detailed lectures teach you the principles and techniques of sitting meditation, the related practice of walking meditation, and the highly beneficial use of meditative awareness in many important activities, including eating and driving. You will also learn how to use the skills of meditation in working with thoughts and emotional states.

    Steven says: "Outstanding introduction"
    "Might Require Multiple Listens"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I very much enjoyed learning about mindfulness and the concepts that entail with the practice. In this lecture, you'll learn how to practice simple basic meditation and how to do so while eating, walking, and sitting as well.

    I've studied various types of meditation throughout the years and this was still a learning lesson. The professor was great, as he had an almost "gentle" approach. When I practiced applying some of the methods he lectured on, I could hear his voice in my mind instructing what to look for and how to observe your thoughts while experiencing simple everyday life tasks such as taking a walk. He mentions several Buddhist concepts along the way, but doesn't emphasize that it's mandatory to embrace them. No pressure.

    I highly recommend if you're interested in learning more about meditation and mindfulness (living in the present moment)

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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