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Jean

I am an avid eclectic reader.

Santa Cruz, CA, United States | Member Since 2010

ratings
651
REVIEWS
614
FOLLOWING
12
FOLLOWERS
557
HELPFUL VOTES
3222

  • Wizard: The Life and Times of Nikola Tesla: Biography of a Genius

    • UNABRIDGED (22 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Marc J. Seifer
    • Narrated By Simon Prebble
    Overall
    (858)
    Performance
    (762)
    Story
    (749)

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943), credited as the inspiration for radio, robots, and even radar, has been called the patron saint of modern electricity. Based on original material and previously unavailable documents, this acclaimed book is the definitive biography of the man considered by many to be the founding father of modern electrical technology.

    Jean says: "Tesla was a hundred years ahead of his time"
    "Tesla was a hundred years ahead of his time"
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    Simon Prebble did a great job narrating the story. The book goes into more depth surrounding the times of Tesla. It gives an overview history of Serbia and surrounding countries. In covering the education of Tesla the author also introduces the reader to the professors that influenced him. Marc Seifer also covers in depth the interaction between Edison, Bell, Westinghouse and investors such as J.P. Morgan, John Aster, Stanford White and others. Tesla health, habits and mental health are covered. Seifer goes into depth covering the wide array of invention of Tesla and many are just becoming a factor in our daily life. It was also interesting to note that there are many more invention that the department of defense placed under a blanket of national security and no information is available on these inventions. This book has only made me want to know more about Tesla and his fellow engineers of the 1890s.

    33 of 34 people found this review helpful
  • Blackett's War: The Men Who Defeated the Nazi U-boats and Brought Science to the Art of Warfare

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Stephen Budiansky
    • Narrated By John Lee
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (48)
    Performance
    (43)
    Story
    (42)

    In March 1941, after a year of unbroken and devastating U-boat onslaughts, the British War Cabinet decided to try a new strategy in the foundering naval campaign. To do so, they hired an intensely private, bohemian physicist who was also an ardent socialist. Patrick Blackett was a former navy officer and future winner of the Nobel Prize; he is little remembered today, but he and his fellow scientists did as much to win the war against Nazi Germany as almost anyone else.

    Jean says: "First time science used to fight a war"
    "First time science used to fight a war"
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    September 1, 2014 will mark the 75th anniversary of Hitler’s invasion of Poland and the start of WWII. One of the least considered, but most critical, aspects of the War was the contest for control of the sea. The pervasive conflict, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill called “the Battle of the Atlantic”. Germany dominated early fighting in the Battle of the Atlantic. The Battle of the Atlantic, in its scope and significance, the sea was vast. It covered more area and lasted longer, 1939-1945, than any land campaign. More than 70,000 allied naval personnel and merchant seaman lost their lives with German Unterseeboots (U-boats) sinking more than 3,500 commercial vessels and 175 warships. The Kriegsmarine had a 75 percent casualty rate.

    Stephen Budiansky has focused the book on battle science. From 1941 to 1943 a small group of British and American Scientist, most without military experience or knowledge revolutionized the way wars are run and won. Blackett’s men taught allied military leaders to use their resources effectively and asked hard question to challenge established wisdom. In the process they created a new discipline, operation research, which plays a vital role today. Blackett emphasized more efficient and effective use of existing systems rather than costly development of new weapons. Blackett’s group focused mainly on the war against the U-boats. They developed a radar guidance system that greatly improved the accuracy of anti-aircraft guns. They advocated the installation of radar in British warship and patrol air-crate to locate U-boats. They developed tactics for aircraft depth charge attacks to increase kills by a factor of ten. The Group suggested new aircraft camouflage to avoid early detection by U-boat lookouts. The scientist also coordinated with British code-breakers to facilitate U-boat location. Blackett proved that large convoys were safer than the smaller groups the Admiralty championed.

    The real hero of the story is Winston Churchill who was in charge of the British Navy in WWI and later minister of munitions. In the 1930s Churchill was a back beach warmer of Parliament. Churchill pressed the government to bring scientific advisors into military affairs as early as 1934. The government did so and this group in 1935 developed Radar. By 1939 the British coast was lined with tracking stations, which was vital to the battle of Britain. But the British navy was resistant to Radar which deprived the British Navy of a potential early advantage against the German fleet.

    Blackett received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1948 for his work on cosmic rays, high energy sub-atomic particles, many other in the group also went on to receive the Nobel Prize. The book is well-written, contains suspenseful and lots of personal and organizational conflicts that can make the stories so colorful. I have only highlighted a few of the interesting stories and accomplishments in this book. This book is not intended for the casual reader. The subject matter is often quite technical. If you are interested in math and science or WWII history you will enjoy this book. The golden voice of John Lee helped bring the scientist stories to life.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Asia's Cauldron: The South China Sea and the End of a Stable Pacific

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Robert D. Kaplan
    • Narrated By Michael Prichard
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (31)
    Performance
    (29)
    Story
    (29)

    Over the last decade, the center of world power has been quietly shifting from Europe to Asia. With oil reserves of several billion barrels, an estimated 900 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and several centuries' worth of competing territorial claims, the South China Sea in particular is a simmering pot of potential conflict. The underreported military buildup in the area where the Western Pacific meets the Indian Ocean means that it will likely be a hinge point for global war and peace for the foreseeable future.

    Jean says: "Pending problems"
    "Pending problems"
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    Kaplan starts the book with some basic economics, geography and history of East Asia. Robert Kaplan says the Pacific will become unstable, but he does not think this must lead to war. Kaplan has found a niche writing books that are a cross between journalism and policy issues. Comparison of Asia to the Europe of 1914 is part of a bigger question about whether China just wants to be a benign regional hegemon, or if it has expansionist aims. Kaplan argues that comparisons to 1914 are overblown. He claims the big difference is Europe is a landscape; East Asia is a seascape and the oceans will act as a barrier against aggression. The author suggests the better comparison is America’s 19th century approach to the Caribbean. He says China is seeking an Asian version of the Monroe Doctrine.

    One reason he is sanguine is the absence of a great ideological struggle. Kaplan insists that the Communist party will not necessarily bully abroad because it bullies at home. I say do not forget the brutality of Leninist Chinese Party State. The book suffers from largely ignoring the East China Sea and the relationship with Japan, which I think could be much more important.

    Asia is far more complicated than Kaplan reveals. If oil is discovered in the China Sea it will only become more complicated. The China Sea is on the way to becoming the most contested body of water in the world. Kaplan said that a Singaporean said they did not wish to be Finlandized or to replace American’s embrace with China’s. The Singaporean went on to say “At the end of the day it is all about military force and naval presence—it is not about passionate and well-meaning talk”. We must remember China is building an enormous Navy and Air Force and the rise of China is now challenging the stability of the area as America’s naval dominance of the Western pacific fades.

    Kaplan ends the book with a quote of a Vietnamese proverb. “Distant water cannot put out a nearby fire.” Michael Prichard did a good job narrating the book.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Top Secret: Clandestine Operations, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By W.E.B. Griffin, William E. Butterworth
    • Narrated By Alexander Cendese
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (25)
    Performance
    (23)
    Story
    (22)

    In the first weeks after World War II, a squeaky-clean new second lieutenant named James D. Cronley Jr. is spotted and recruited for a new enterprise that will eventually be transformed into something called the CIA. One war may have ended, but another one has already begun, against an enemy that is bigger, smarter, and more vicious: The Soviet Union. The Soviets have hit the ground running, and Cronley's job is to help frustrate them, harass them, and spy on them any way he can.

    Jean says: "cold war heros"
    "cold war heros"
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    This is book one of the Clandestine Operation Series. It appears Griffin is launching this series off the Argentine or Honor Bound Series. Griffin’s sketch of the immediate post-WWII bureaucratic territorial clashes has purpose; it’s an outline of how the demobilized OSS hot-war heroes become CIA cold warriors. The main Character is James D. Cronley Jr. In the book the lead characters have to fight the FBI, the Russians and other to get their job done. Cronley and his men are OSS waiting to be transferred to the newly created CIA. Captain Cronley is in charge of obtaining the German Spies that were in Russia away from being captured by the Russian KBG and turn them into working for the CIA.

    General Reinhardt Gehian, Chief of Eastern Front intelligence was a Wehrmacht General, Gehian and his men started to work for the OSS near the end of the war. He later became Chief of West German Intelligence in the 1950s. This is what I like about W.E.B. Griffin books; he places his fictional people into the real history he is writing about.

    Cronley has General Gehian and his men in an isolated Bavarian monastery while a new facility is being built for the CIA. The narrative’s ripe with meetings, confrontations, lies, subterfuge rather than fighting and gunplay, a change from the usual Griffin story. The dialogue is classic Griffin. The story is fast-paced, lots of interesting plot twists.

    I did not particularly care for the narrator Alexander Cendese. He pronounced some of the Spanish words incorrectly. I am not as familiar with German to know how he did with those words. The majority of Griffins books have been narrated by three great narrators of action books, Scott Brick, Dick Hill and David Colacci. I hope the publisher will return to one of these narrators for future books in this series.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Life and Writings of John Milton

    • ORIGINAL (6 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By The Great Courses
    • Narrated By Professor Seth Lerer
    Overall
    (5)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (5)

    There is no disputing that John Milton is considered one of the supreme writers in the history of English letters. Yet, for a number of reasons, many modern readers are unaware of the pleasures of his poetry and prose. These 12 lectures examine Milton's life and work in order to understand the richness and depth of his poetry, its ways of representing 17th-century English life and culture, and its impact on later writers and on English literary history as a whole.

    Jean says: "A great overview of John Milton"
    "A great overview of John Milton"
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    When I was in school I primarily took courses in science. Now that I am retired I thought I might look into areas I neglected in my life such as poetry. I chose this Great Course on The Life and Writings of John Milton as a way to obtain a lot of concise information so I would have a good understanding of Milton. Professor Seth Lerer is a professor at Comparative Literature at Stanford.

    John Milton (1608-1674) is considered one of the great writers in the history of English literature. This lecture series exams Milton’s life and his poems. Lerer goes a bit into 17th century English life and culture to show its impact on Milton’s writings. Milton wrote in a time of religious flux and political upheaval. Lerer points out that Milton wrote in English, Latin, Greek and Italian. Milton achieved international renown within his lifetime and is famous for his poem “Areopagitica” (1644). Lerer points out that it was written in condemnation of pre-publication censorship. It is considered one of the most impassioned defense of free speech and freedom of the Press. Lerer covered in-depth the epic poem “Paradise Lost” (1667)

    In listening to Lerer discuss and read parts of Milton’s poems, I thought the ideal person to read Milton’s poems would be Richard Burton. This is an ideal introduction to John Milton in an easy to listen to lecture format.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Ready to Kill: Nathan McBride, Book 4

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By Andrew Peterson
    • Narrated By Dick Hill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (593)
    Performance
    (544)
    Story
    (547)

    When a mysterious note referencing a top-secret US operation is tossed over the wall of the embassy in Nicaragua, Nathan McBride and his old pal Harv are called out of retirement by CIA Director Rebecca Cantrell and sent to Central America. Cantrell wants the situation resolved quickly and knows that Nathan is the man to do it; after all, he has a history with the place. The jungle he and Harv are about to land in is the same one that Nathan barely escaped with his life decades before, an ordeal that left him physically and psychologically scarred.

    Hill says: "Outstanding"
    "Action packed story"
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    The Nathan McBride novels are written from the soldier’s perspective, with the kind of detail that keeps you in the action. “Ready to Kill” has a lots of sniper psychology in the content of the story. The book is well-written, action packed with lots of suspense.

    The CIA Director, Rebecca Cantrell, request Nathan and Harv go on a covert mission to Nicaragua. No mission will test Nathan like this one. Nathan is asked to return to the area he was tortured and almost died. He has spent years fight the demons of that ordeal. This assignment will test Nathan further and harder than ever before. Nathan and Harv have to hunt down and stop a sniper turned killer. This is a man that Harv and Nathan had trained when they had previously been in Nicaragua.

    The author provided as background a review of the history of gold mining in Nicaragua. I always enjoy it when the author tosses in some real history or information into a fictional story. Dick Hill has been the narrator of the entire series. He is great at narrating this type of book.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • The King of California: J.G. Boswell and the Making of a Secret American Empire

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Mark Arax, Rick Wartzman
    • Narrated By James Patrick Cronin
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    J. G. Boswell was the biggest farmer in America. He built a secret empire while thumbing his nose at nature, politicians, labor unions, and every journalist who ever tried to lift the veil on the ultimate "factory in the fields". The King of California is the previously untold account of how a Georgia slave-owning family migrated to California in the early 1920s, drained one of America 's biggest lakes in an act of incredible hubris and carved out the richest cotton empire in the world.

    Jean says: "Interesting story of California Ag history"
    "Interesting story of California Ag history"
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    Max Arax and Rick Wartzman tell the story of a family that combined hard work, farming wisdom and political maneuvering to build a farming empire in the San Joaquin Valley of California. This is a well-written and well researched story of the largest privately owned farming operation in the United States. In my opinion the authors appear to have a negative opinion regarding large industrial style of farming.

    Jim Boswell moved to California from Georgia where the family had long been cotton growers. The boll weevil drove him out of Georgia to find land where cotton could grow. He worked as a cotton broker, until he saw the land of the southern San Joaquin Valley in California. He started buying land to farm, and then built Gin’s to process the cotton. He ruthlessly went after all the water rights he could obtain. As he grew into one of the largest farms his wife died. About 11 years after the death of his first wife Boswell married Ruth Chandler, Harry Chandler’s daughter. The Chandler owned the Los Angeles times, large tracks of land in the San Fernando Valley, Tejon Ranch and other properties.

    The authors tell how Boswell bought land and drained Tulare Lake and started growing crops and buying more land. The Primary crops included Pima Cotton ( used by LL Bean, Hanes Co. Etc.) alfalfa hay, tomatoes, onions, wheat, safflower, then later almonds, and other varieties of nuts. The Boswells specialized in the long thread Pima cotton that is highly sought after. The company was established in Corcoran California in 1921. They ginned their own cotton and built processing plants to extract cotton oil and for all their crops. The book discusses the problems of the various varieties of migrant farm workers over the years. The migrant workers ranged from the dust bowl refugees, to German POW during the war, Chinese, Filipinos, to the Mexican. Arax and Wartzman go into depth about the movement of black cotton pickers and the treatment of these workers. The book goes into the various attempts to unionize the workers over the years and the various labor strikes.

    In 80 years the family gained control of acres of farmland ranging from the San Diego area to San Joaquin Valley to Arizona and Colorado. The company now is also in Australia. Jim G. Boswell II took over at the death of J.G. Boswell and James W. Boswell is now the current CEO. Each one has increased the value and lands of the company. The book also goes into the inner family dynamics. The family is famous for their philanthropy and is a major supporter of the California Institute of Technology and the Claremont McKenna College. Anyone interested in California history, California agriculture history would enjoy this book. I found the book interesting as I know many of the people and issues the book covers. Sort of a trip down memory lane. James Patrick Cronin did a good job narrating the book.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • The Old Blue Line: Joanna Brady, Book 15.5

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 56 mins)
    • By J. A. Jance
    • Narrated By James Eckhouse
    Overall
    (28)
    Performance
    (26)
    Story
    (28)

    Not a jump in the car, see the sights kind of ride. He's been taken for everything he has. He's lost his house, his restaurant business, his savings, his car, his best friend, his faith—all to his conniving ex-wife. But that was seven years ago. He picked himself up, left Chicago, and started over in Peoria, Arizona, running the Roundhouse Bar and Grill. He doesn't look back on those bad years; there's no point. Not until two curious cops show up at the Roundhouse.

    Jean says: "It was delightful"
    "It was delightful"
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    This is a novella about Butch Dixon before he met and married Joanne Brady. J. A. Jance is an excellent writer and this short story is fast paced but also full of detail. Butch inherited a bar and grill from his Grandmother on her death. She had trained him how to operate that type of business in the several years he lived with her before her death. It is called the Roundhouse Bar and Grill in Peoria Arizona. Butch had lost everything when he wife divorced him and ran off with his best friend and business manager. He was depressed, angry and went to live with his grandmother who helped turn him around.

    One day two Las Vegas detectives show up at the business, telling him he is a suspect in the murder of his ex-wife. Problem is Butch was in Las Vegas the weekend of the murder. Butch contacts his grandmother’s best friend Tim, a retired police officer. Tim sends another retired police officer to do some investigating. He finds Butch is being framed for the murder. Tim calls in an elderly criminal defense attorney to represent Butch. Along with two more retired detectives they set out to prove Butch is innocent.

    I enjoyed the “old blue line” working on the case with such gusto. This was an enjoyable story. It was fun to watch the oldies to their magic. I hope that Jance writes more stories about this elderly blue line. James Eckhouse did a good job narrating the book.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Annie Jacobsen
    • Narrated By Annie Jacobsen
    Overall
    (64)
    Performance
    (60)
    Story
    (59)

    Drawing on exclusive interviews with dozens of Paperclip family members, colleagues, and interrogators, and with access to German archival documents (including papers made available to her by direct descendants of the Third Reich's ranking members), files obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, and lost dossiers discovered at the National Archives and Harvard University, Annie Jacobsen follows more than a dozen German scientists through their postwar lives and into one of the most complex, nefarious, and jealously guarded government secrets of the 20th century.

    Jean says: "The Osenberg list"
    "The Osenberg list"
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    In 1945, Operation Overcast (renamed Operation Paperclip for the paperclips attached to the dossiers of the scientist) began. More than 1600 German scientist were secretly recruited to work for the United States. There was a race between the United States and the U.S.S. R. to obtain these scientists. At the time Albert Einstein, Eleanor Roosevelt and Rabbi Steven Wise publically opposed the program.

    In 1998 President Clinton signed the Nazi War Crimes disclosure Act, which pushed through the declassification of American’s intelligence records, including F.B. I., Army Intelligence and C.I.A. files of German agents, scientists and war criminals. Jacobsen accessed these documents, along with her research in various special collections, interviews with former intelligence personnel and relatives of the scientists. This makes Jacobsen’s account the most in-depth to date. The author tracked 21 of these Nazi scientists. Eight of her subjects worked directly with the upper echelon of the Nazi government. Some of these are Werner Von Braun, Hubertus Strughold, Walter Dornberger, and Arthur Rudolph, Fritz Hoffman. The author described in detail the hunt for the Nazi secret chemical and biological warfare sites and the hunt for the scientist.
    Jacobsen focuses mostly on biologists, chemists and physicians. She said the rocket scientist had already been widely written about.

    The author painstakingly covers the various scientist works for the Nazis; I wish she would have equally covered their work in American. We know the benefit of the work by the rocket scientist in developing the Saturn rocket. German Chemist Fritz Hoffman was assigned by the U.S. to research toxic agents for military use. He is credited with the development of Agent Orange. It was used to defoliate trees in Vietnam. Hoffman died in 1967. Other German scientist worked in the area of aeronautical medicine, research into diabetes, neurological disease and also developing equipment. I believe one of them developed the ear thermometer. The book is an achievement of investigative reporting and historical writing. I would have preferred Jacobsen provide us with enough information about the works preformed in America to help us answer the question ----was our deal with the devil worth it? The author narrated the book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Competition

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Marcia Clark
    • Narrated By January LaVoy
    Overall
    (22)
    Performance
    (20)
    Story
    (20)

    A Columbine-style shooting at a high school in the San Fernando Valley has left a community shaken to its core. Two students are identified as the killers. Both are dead, believed to have committed a mutual suicide. In the aftermath of the shooting, LA Special Trials prosecutor Rachel Knight teams up with her best girlfriend, LAPD detective Bailey Keller. As Rachel and Bailey interview students at the high school, they realize that the facts don't add up. Could it be that the students suspected of being the shooters are actually victims?

    Jean says: "Gripping"
    "Gripping"
    Overall
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    There has been a mass murder at a high school. L.A. prosecutor Rachel Knight has been called to the scene by L. A. detective Bailey Keller. At first it is thought the two killers killed each other but soon the police realize they may have two or more killers on the loose and threatening to commit even more mass killings.

    The book is well written, intelligent, and it kept me reading late into the night. The story comes right out of the headlines. Clark does a good job with various plots threads, keeping suspense high. Every time I think I know how this will end Clark sends me down another path. The author tends to focus more on the psychology behind a mass shooting with Keller and Knight in frequent meetings with the two consulting police psychologist.

    I know I have made this comment in the other books in this series, but I question why the prosecutor is acting as a detective. I do realize the Marcia Clarke was a well known prosecutor and knows the job. But in real life, does the prosecutor perform the detective role to this extent? If you enjoy a good mystery this is a book for you. January LaVoy does a good job narrating the book.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Sgt. Reckless: America's War Horse

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Robin Hutton
    • Narrated By Susan Boyce
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Hutton has now written a fascinating full biography of Sergeant Reckless, who earned two Purple Hearts for her heroic efforts, among other military decorations. Hutton has spoken with the marines who fought alongside Reckless and tells the complete and captivating tale of how a would-be Korean racehorse became one of the greatest Marine Corps wartime heroes. Sgt. Reckless brings the legend back to life more than half a century later.

    Jean says: "Captivating story"
    "Captivating story"
    Overall
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    The Military should create a medal for bravery and valor above and beyond duty such as the bronze and silver star for the animals in the service. Also an equivalent of the Medal of Honor should be created and Sgt. Reckless its first recipient. It is obvious this book was well researched. The author interviewed hundreds of Marines and other people whose lives were touched by Reckless and incorporated the wonderful stories into this book. Sgt. Reckless had a unique personality that attracted the Marines to her and she bonded with each member of her unit (75 mm Recoilless Rifle Platoon of the 5th Marines, First Marine Division. Robin Hutton’s passion for this little horse/pony and her story is evident in the details, not just about Sgt. Reckless, but in laying the groundwork for the Military action that Sgt. Reckless participated in. Hutton tells Reckless’s story from birth to her life at Camp Pendleton.

    Reckless went through “hoof camp” where she was trained to step over communication lines, barb wire, ignore battle sounds and get down when incoming fire arrived. She only had to be shown once or sometimes twice and she learned the lesson. She was a 13 hand Mongolian mare, chestnut in color with white blaze down her face and three white stockings. She only weighted 900 pounds. Her job was to take ammunition (200 to 300 lbs. per load) to the men and carry the wounded back. Reckless amazingly did this on her own, men loaded her with the ammunitions, and she went alone to deliver it to the men and came back alone with the wounded on her back. She was named Reckless by the Platoon because that was their call sign.

    The book goes into detail about the bloody battle of “Outpost Vegas” in March 1953. On one day Reckless made 51 round trips up and down steep terrain that no man could travel carrying nearly 5 tons of ammunitions to various gun sites and returning carrying the wounded. Incoming artillery was exploding at the rate of 500 rounds per minute, through this Reckless covered over 35 miles that day and she did all this solo. She was wounded twice in this battle. Once on her left flank and over her eye. Plus her ears where cut from barbwire. She was promoted to Sergeant by the Marines for her valor in this battle. She was the only true NCO in the Marines; those strips meant something to her men. Sgt. Major James E. Babbitt stated, “It’s difficult to describe the elation and boost in morale that little white faced mare gave Marines as she outfoxed the enemy bringing vitally needed ammunitions up the mountain.”

    Reckless was discharged as Staff Sergeant. Medals awarded are as follows: Two Purple Hearts, Good Conduct Medal, Presidential Unit Citation with Star, National Defense Service Medal, Korean Service Medal, United Nations Service Medal, Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation, Navy Unit Commendation and the French Foarragere. She wore them proudly on her red and gold blanket whenever she was paraded around at official function.

    Robin Hutton led a campaign to have Sgt. Reckless recognized by a monument. A Statue of the Mongolian mare, Sgt. Reckless, was dedicated at the National Museum of the Marine Corp, in Triangle Virginia on July 26, 2013. The statue was sculpted by Joycelyn Russell. A second monument is at Camp Pendleton where Reckless lived out her days and is buried. She was the first female Marine in Combat. The Marines just say, “ she was a Marine.” This is a captivating story of the most noble of creatures. If you are interested in history or just a horse lover you will enjoy this book. Susan Boyce did an excellent job narrating the book.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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