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Jean

I am an avid eclectic reader.

Santa Cruz, CA, United States | Member Since 2010

3389
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 646 reviews
  • 683 ratings
  • 1272 titles in library
  • 147 purchased in 2014
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  • The Kennedy Detail: JFK's Secret Service Agents Break Their Silence

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Gerald Blaine, Lisa McCubbin
    • Narrated By Alan Sklar
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (438)
    Performance
    (274)
    Story
    (275)

    Even today, almost five decades after John F. Kennedy was slain, the public continues to be captivated by the "Kennedy Curse" and new theories about what really happened on that fateful day in 1963. For nearly 50 years former Secret Service agent Clint Hill has lived with the unimaginable guilt of losing a president on his watch and has obeyed an honor code of silence, refusing to contribute to any books about the assassination. Until now.

    Vidoloff says: "A must "read" in my opinion"
    "The Kennedy Detail"
    Overall

    This was an interesting story. I have lived through it all and remember the day like it was yesterday. It was nice to hear an insider view point. The narration could have been better. The author repeated several points over and over but at least he got the information across. The information on Jackie Kennedy was interesting and confirmed other stories about her. Like any book it has it good and bad part but it is well worth a listen. It was about time the secret service agents provided their view point of that horrible day in Dallas.

    19 of 21 people found this review helpful
  • The Haj

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By Leon Uris
    • Narrated By Neil Shah
    Overall
    (128)
    Performance
    (106)
    Story
    (109)

    Leon Uris retums to the land of his acclaimed best-seller Exodus for an epic story of hate and love, vengeance and forgiveness. The Middle East is the powerful setting for this sweeping tale of a land where revenge is sacred and hatred noble. Where an Arab ruler tries to save his people from destruction but cannot save them from themselves. When violence spreads like a plague across the lands of Palestine - this is the time of The Haj.

    Jean says: "Oversimplification of Middle East problems"
    "Oversimplification of Middle East problems"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I read this book in 1984 when it first came out. I have a note in my records that I thought the book was excellent. I can remember that I did not enjoy it as much as I did “Exodus.” I thought that with all the problems in the Middle East the book might provide me with some insight to the situation, so I decided to re-read the book.

    The story is about a Palestinian Arab family living in Palestine in the 1920-1950 eras. The main narrator of the story is Ishmael the youngest son of Ibrahim, who is the Muktar of an isolated village of Tabah in the Ajalon Valley. The book drags along, Ibrahim made his pilgrimage to Mecca as a young man. The pilgrimage is called the Haj, thus the title of the book. The story takes us to the formation of Israel and the family chooses to flee Palestine to a refugee camp near Jericho.

    Uris provides colorful details, descriptions of the country and lots of sex and violence. I had to keep in mind the book is written by a Jew and the time frame of the book is 1920 to 1950. Uris does provide some history mixed into the story. I really enjoyed the part of the story when Ishmael took artifact he found to the archeologist. The history explained by him and the explanation about archeology was interesting. The author does write with some sympathy for the Arabs but mostly the impression I got from the book is the British and Arabs are bad and the Jews are good.

    I had a totally different response to the book than I did when I read it in 1984. At that time I just enjoyed the story, this time I see the hyperbole, propaganda and the oversimplification. The story remains exciting but now I guess I can see more than just the story. Neil Shah does a good job narrating the story.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Ike's Bluff: President Eisenhower's Secret Battle to Save the World

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Evan Thomas
    • Narrated By Brian Troxell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (117)
    Performance
    (99)
    Story
    (100)

    Upon assuming the presidency in 1953, Dwight Eisenhower came to be seen by many as a doddering lightweight. Yet behind the bland smile and apparent simplemindedness was a brilliant, intellectual tactician. As Evan Thomas reveals in his provocative examination of Ike's White House years, Eisenhower was a master of calculated duplicity. As with his bridge and poker games he was eventually forced to stop playing, Ike could be patient and ruthless in the con, and generous and expedient in his partnerships.

    Jean says: "Seems like he played a lot of golf"
    "Seems like he played a lot of golf"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book is primarily about Eisenhower’s foreign policy and how he successfully kept the United States out of a major war during his eight years as president, which was his major goal. I have just finished reading “The Brother” by Stephen Kinzer about John Foster Dulles, Eisenhower’s Secretary of State and Allen Dulles his head of the CIA. The two books complement each other to give me a more complete picture of the Eisenhower era. I lived through this period in history and it does not seem like it was that long ago, on the other hand, so much has happened since the ‘50s it seem like a long time ago. Reading these two book helps understand the problems of today. Eisenhower’s ambiguity is a recurring theme in the book. His style was to avoid telling anyone his definite views on a subject. Eisenhower was a shrewd operator who never let anyone know whether he would use nuclear weapons or not.

    The author uses the Hungarian uprising of 1956 as an example of one of Eisenhower’s best and worst moments for his policy of “take a hard line—and bluff”. Though he successfully avoided a major war the Soviet Union over Hungary, choosing containment over confrontation, and his administration’s rhetoric about “rolling back” communism encouraged Hungarians to expect America’s support which did not come. A “CIA backed clandestine radio stations” had been encouraging Hungarians to fight.

    Eisenhower let John Foster Dulles carry the rhetoric for his administration. Ike willing let himself appear disengaged, even weak to unbalance his opponents. The author states that Eisenhower skill at concealment, deception and secrecy turned Allen Dulles loose at the CIA. Mostly Thomas portrays Eisenhower in a favorable light.

    I found the book interesting and with “The Brothers” gave me a good over view of the 1950’s international politics. Brian Troxell did an excellent job narrating the book.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Bloody Jack

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By L.A. Meyer
    • Narrated By Katherine Kellgren
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1341)
    Performance
    (838)
    Story
    (832)

    Life as a ship's boy aboard HMS Dolphin is a dream come true for Jacky Faber. Gone are the days of scavenging for food and fighting for survival on the streets of 18th-century London. Instead, Jacky is becoming a skilled and respected sailor as the crew pursues pirates on the high seas. There's only one problem: Jacky is a girl. And she will have to use every bit of her spirit, wit, and courage to keep the crew from discovering her secret.

    Terry says: "Sometimes it clicks"
    "Kellegren is masterful"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am a big fan of old fashion (late 1700 to 1800) sailing stories. This book is a bit different. Mary “Jacky” Faber, age 12, is a memorable protagonist and we get to see her grow up on board the HMS Dolphin. Mary’s parents and sister died of the plague in 1798. She joins a gang of orphans and learns to steal and beg to survive. Their leader, Charlie, is killed and Mary takes the opportunity to start a new life. She dons Charlie’s clothes, cuts her hair and gets a job as a ship boy on HMS Dolphin. She is hired because she can read. In this story HMS Dolphin’s assignment is to look for pirates.

    The story covers the daily life on a sailing ship in the 1800s. This is a historical novel and Meyer has kept his characters in their setting with all the prejudices and stigmas of the period. The accents, dialects are also consistent with the time and occupations of the characters.

    The audio version helps interpret the dialect the story is written in. I would not want to read this in book format. The narrator, Katherine Kellegren, brings Jacky to life, so much so, she seems to be Jacky. I understand this is a series and I am looking forward to listening to the next installment. Not sure how they will continue this series because of the ending of the book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Bach: Music in the Castle of Heaven

    • UNABRIDGED (21 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By John Eliot Gardiner
    • Narrated By Antony Ferguson
    Overall
    (8)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (7)

    John Eliot Gardiner grew up passing one of the only two authentic portraits of Bach every morning and evening on the stairs of his parents’ house, where it hung for safety during World War II. He has been studying and performing Bach ever since, and is now regarded as one of the composer's greatest living interpreters. The fruits of this lifetime's immersion are distilled in this remarkable book, grounded in the most recent Bach scholarship but moving far beyond it.

    Jean says: "Interesting"
    "Interesting"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The author is a well known Conductor in England. He is the founder of the Monteverdi Choir and the English Baroque Soloists. In some ways this book is an autobiography of Gardiner and his search for information to understand Bach, wrapped in a biography of Bach.

    Gardiner tells of the difficulties Bach had with his employers throughout his career and his recurrent refusal to accept authority. He tells of Bach’s life as an orphan and his problems with schools. Gardiner book is dense with fact and full of diversions. The book is also rich in informal conjectures. He writes of Back’s gradual turn from what listeners today might consider “the parochiality of the liturgical context” to “music that shows more and more signs of an almost limitless appeal.” Gardiner speculates “It is entirely possible that Bach’s growing disenchantment with Cantatas in the 1730s arose from a since that the communality of belief that he had once shared with his congregation was breaking down, and that, for whatever reason, he was now failing to make his mark.”

    The author writes in a lively, conversational style. Gardiner has done an excellent job of painting us a picture of Bach considering how little information about him is available. Antony Ferguson does a great job narrating the book.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Covenant with Death

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By John Harris
    • Narrated By Mike Rogers
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    They joined for their country. They fought for each other. When war breaks out in 1914, Mark Fenner and his Sheffield friends immediately flock to Kitchener's call. Amid waving flags and boozy celebration, the three men - Fen, his best friend Locky and self-assured Frank, rival for the woman Fen loves - enlist as volunteers to take on the Germans and win glory.

    Jean says: "A superb Great War historical novel"
    "A superb Great War historical novel"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    My grandmother was born in Sheffield. I can remember my great grandmother and grandmother telling me stories of what happened to the City of Sheffield after the battle of the Somme in World War I. My maternal great uncle was a member of the Sheffield City Battalion (12th Battalion) York Regiment 94th Brigade, 31 Division and died at the Somme. I have his regimental patch with the white rose on it. I grabbed this book “Covenant with Death” by John Harris because it was a historical novel about the Sheffield City Battalion. The book was first published in 1961 and has been reprinted several times since then. The audio book I read was released on September 4, 2014.

    The book is a novel about Mark Fenner, a reporter from the Sheffield newspaper, some of his friends from work and other men of the city of Sheffield. The first half of the book is about signing up with great glee and anticipation when War was declared in 1914. Then the waiting to be called, while life went on normally, at last call came, the training, and finally the issuing of summer uniforms and being sent to defend the Suez Canal. Finally they are sent to Senne, France in April 1916. The story continues with the daily routine of the men who by now we have gotten to know well. The last half of the book deals with the battle of the Somme. The book shows us with unbearable actuality what happened to the Sheffield City battalion on that horrible day. In the Somme offensive they were on the extreme left of the 15 mile British front. At 7:20 a.m. they moved into No Man’s Land at 7:30 a.m. bombardment stopped and four waves of the battalion rose and advanced into a devastating hail of machine gun and artillery fire. After 10 minutes all of the 1131 officers of men of the battalion were dead. In the story our hero Mark Fenner is the only one alive. But in the real battle only Corporal Outram, a Signaler was the only one left alive. This was repeated up and down the line and at the end of the ten minutes over 70,000 British was dead. This was the deadliest ten minutes in the history of the British Army; at the end of the battle one million men were dead. The battle of the Somme was the costliest battle in British history. The minute by minute description as told by Fenner is gripping. It puts you right into the battle with him. There is a big difference in reading a story from a personal viewpoint of the battle of the Somme than the history book description.

    My great grandmother told me that most of the young men of Sheffield died in that battle and it took a long time for the city to recover. Every house was in mourning. The book gave us the contrast between the years of preparation and the moment of destruction of a single generation of a cities’ population on 1 July 1916. If you can picture this scene in many towns and cities throughout England and the British Empire with all their young men dead or wounded you will then understand why they changed the rules and never again allow regiments of men from the same city.

    This is a great book that personalized the Great War. I am sure there are many people that would not be able to read this book. But if you are able, you will learn in great detail what it was like to be an ordinary soldier in the Great War. Mike Rogers did an excellent job narrating the book.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Killing Patton: The Strange Death of World War II's Most Audacious General

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard
    • Narrated By Bill O'Reilly
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (65)
    Performance
    (56)
    Story
    (61)

    General George S. Patton, Jr., died under mysterious circumstances in the months following the end of World War II. For almost 70 years, there has been suspicion that his death was not an accident - and may very well have been an act of assassination. Killing Patton will take listeners inside the final year of the war and recount the events surrounding Patton's tragic demise, naming names of the many powerful individuals who wanted him silenced.

    Alan says: "A good book with alot of flaws"
    "Enduring mystery of World War II"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is the first time I have read a book written by Bill O’Reilly. I almost did not buy it because of O’Reilly but the suggestions that he could prove that General Patton was assassinated intrigued me. I got the book to see if O’Reilly would reasonably prove his claim. The death of General Patton in December 1945 is one of the enduring mysteries of World War II. For seventy-four years, there have been suspicions and lots of conspiracy theories that his death was not an accident. O’Reilly and Dugard take readers inside the final years of the War, the majority of the book is taken up with an over view of 1944 and 1945. They also recount the events surrounding Patton’s tragic demise, naming names of the many powerful individuals who wanted him silenced in the last chapter of the book.

    The author’s claim newly unearthed diaries of Douglas Bazata have been found. Bazata worked for the OSS in Europe during the war. The OSS was headed by General “Wild Bill” Donovan. Bazata claims that Donovan ordered him to kill General Patton. The diaries state that Bazata staged the car accident then shot General Patton with a low velocity projectile which broke his neck. This is not new information; this was ignored by the press and historians at the time. There was a made for T.V. Movie made using this information called “The Last Days of Patton.” There is a new movie called “Silence Patton: First Victim of the Cold War.” The authors are emphasizing the second part of the Bazata’s claim. When Patton was getting better and about to be transferred to a hospital in the United States, U.S. officials turned a blind eye as an agent of the NKVD poisoned General Patton, therefore, the author’s claim that Stalin ordered the assassination of Patton.

    General Patton is one of the general that I read everything I can find about him. I have read about these claims for years. The authors did not convince me of the validity of these claims. I was looking for documentation that proved these old theories. I have only highlighted the theory, you will need to read the book yourself for the details and make up your own mind if they proved their theory. O’Reilly narrated the book himself.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Stephen Kinzer
    • Narrated By David Cochran Heath
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (93)
    Performance
    (79)
    Story
    (80)

    John Foster Dulles was secretary of state while his brother, Allen Dulles, was director of the Central Intelligence Agency. In this book, Stephen Kinzer places their extraordinary lives against the backdrop ofAmerican culture and history. He uses the framework of biography to ask: Why does the United States behave as it does in the world?

    Jean says: "A duel biography"
    "A duel biography"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I found this book most interesting. I knew some of the information contained in the book but this is the first time I had seen in presented in this manner. I was aware of the Dulles brothers but it did not register with me that they were both in power at the same time. The Dulles family has served the government through many generations. John W. Foster was Secretary of State (1892-93) for President Benjamin Harrison. Eleanor Foster married Robert Lansing who served as Secretary of State under Woodrow Wilson. Under FDR Allan Dulles served a decade in the State Department then served in the OSS where he was sent to Switzerland. He was to commission Carl Gustav Jung to prepare psychological profiles of Hitler and other Nazi leaders. Kinzer portrays Allen as a facile, charming womanizer with a lifelong passion for the ethos of espionage. Kinzer paints Foster as a stridently moralistic cunning strategist in international commerce. The author writes “They made an ideal team: one brother was great fun and a gifted seducer, the other had uncanny ability in building fortunes.”

    Foster served as a foreign policy adviser to Thomas Dewey, the Governor of New York. Forster became an avid critic of Stalin’s essays and speeches. In 1952 Dwight Eisenhower became President and appointed Foster as Secretary of State. Allen became director of the CIA. Never before had two siblings enjoyed such concentrated power to manage United States foreign policy until the Kennedy brother came to power.

    Eisenhower adopted the Containment Doctrine developed by George F. Kennan. I read “The Kennan Diaries” in March of 2014. This book goes into depth about the containment strategy. The author covers in great detail, the six different nationalist and communist movements around the world that covert action was taken by the Dulles brothers. There are Iran, Guatemala, Vietnam, Indonesia, African Congo and Cuba. Kinzer blunt assessment of Foster’s intellect, quoted Winston Churchill’s disparaging verdict that the Secretary of State was “dull unimaginative, uncomprehending.”

    Anyone wanting to know why the United States is hated across much of the world need look no farther that this book. “The Brothers” is a riveting chronicle of government sanctioned murder, casual elimination of “inconvenient” regimes, relentless prioritization of American corporate interest and cynical arrogances on the part of two men who were among the most powerful in the world.

    The author blames the two brothers for most of the evil of the cold war on the other hand he gives little attention to their sister who was their opposite. Eleanor Lansing Dulles graduated from Harvard with a doctorate in economics. She worked for the State Department for over twenty years overseeing the reconstruction of the economy of post war Europe. She helped establish the International Monetary Fund and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development. When her brother, John Foster Dulles, became Secretary of State he tired to remove her from State but she successful fought him. She was hailed as “The Mother of Berlin” for helping to revitalize Berlin’s economy and culture during the 1950s. She retired in 1962 and became a professor of economics at Georgetown University.

    If you are interested in history, cold war, covert operation this is the book for you. David Cochran Heath did a good job narrating the book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Final Countdown: NASA and the End of the Space Shuttle Program

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 58 mins)
    • By Pat Duggins
    • Narrated By Pat Duggins
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (26)
    Performance
    (25)
    Story
    (25)

    Journalist Pat Duggins, National Public Radio's resident "space expert", chronicles the planning stages of the Space Shuttle program in the early 1970s, the thrill of the first flight in 1981, construction of the International Space Station in the 1990s, and the decision in the early 2000s to shut the program down.

    Jean says: "End of the Shuttle"
    "End of the Shuttle"
    Overall
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    Story

    This is a short book that makes a nice break from reading extremely long books. I have been a fan of the space program since it started. I try to read as much about NASA as I can, thus I grabbed this book to read. Duggins provides us with the reasons for the end of the shuttle program. As well, it covers major milestones for the program. It is neither a concise history nor a program review. Rather, Duggins book takes the reader on a human perspective. It is, the social issues come more to the fro than those of a technical nature.

    The author’s fondness for the space industry comes through in the book. Duggins acknowledges the shuttles shortcomings, he also lauds it successes. Duggins discusses the dramatic influences of politics up on the space shuttle program. The author does not cover the effect of closing the shuttle program on the key areas such as Florida’s Space Coast, The Johnson Space Center or California space area or about the thousands of workers who will lose their jobs.

    Pat Duggins is a senior news analyst at WMFE in Central Florida. He has covered more than 85 shuttle launches. Pat Duggins does his own narration.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Edge of Eternity: The Century Trilogy, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (36 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Ken Follett
    • Narrated By John Lee
    Overall
    (163)
    Performance
    (128)
    Story
    (135)

    Throughout these books, Follett has followed the fortunes of five intertwined families - American, German, Russian, English, and Welsh - as they make their way through the twentieth century. Now they come to one of the most tumultuous eras of all: the enormous social, political, and economic turmoil of the 1960s through the 1980s, from civil rights, assassinations, mass political movements and Vietnam to the Berlin Wall, the Cuban Missile Crisis, presidential impeachment, revolution - and rock and roll.

    Elisa says: "Some good, some bad"
    "great historical novel"
    Overall
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    This is the last volume of Follett’s Century Trilogy. I was hooked with “Fall of Giants” and was so excited to read the final volume of the trilogy but in another way I am sad to see my friends leave me. This book, as with the other two, is a very long book that you never want to end. Follett is chronicling the pivotal events of the twentieth century through the eyes of a vast array of deftly drawn characters
    .
    This volume starts off with Rebecca Hoffman, a school teacher in communist East Berlin. In 1961 she discovers her secretive husband is a clandestine Stasi Lieutenant who is spying on her family. In the United States George Jakes has just graduated from Harvard Law School. Jakes is of mix-race and civil-rights minded join the Freedom Riders to battle racial inequality. Jakes goes to work for the Justice Department and joins Robert Kennedy’s inner circle. In Russia, Dimitri “Dimka” Dvorlen an aide to Nikita Khrushchev finds himself embroiled in heated US-Soviet nuclear political power plays. Cameron Dewar, the Senator’s grandson becomes politically active with espionage. Half way through the book two cousins a German and A Briton form a rock band in Hamburg. I noticed that revenge plays a role in the story with Hans and his power in the Stasi going after Rebecca and her family for the rest of his life. Cam trying to destroy Eve Williams after she refused to date him when they were teenager he tries to destroy her career when they are adults. It is amazing how vindictive people can be.

    Expertly paced, character rich exploits, Follett created a fascinating story about five families-English, Russian, Welsh, German and American whose fates personalize historical events. We have followed these families through three generations; the author has made them so real I feel as if I am part of the family. The various viewpoints of the characters in the novel intertwine the fictional with the real historical figures in the unique way only Ken Follett can write. I can image there is an enormous amount of research required to write this trilogy and allowing for the relative fabrication provided when writing fiction. Surprisingly the book is fast paced, switching to and fro between the different time periods, countries and characters involved in the pivotal historical moment. This historical fiction book makes learning history enjoyable. John Lee, with his golden voice, narrated the entire series.

    8 of 11 people found this review helpful
  • Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Karen Abbott
    • Narrated By Karen White
    Overall
    (6)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (5)

    Karen Abbott illuminates one of the most fascinating yet little-known aspects of the Civil War: The stories of four courageous women - a socialite, a farmgirl, an abolitionist, and a widow - who were spies. After shooting a Union soldier in her front hall with a pocket pistol, Belle Boyd became a courier and spy for the Confederate army, using her charms to seduce men on both sides. Emma Edmonds cut off her hair and assumed the identity of a man to enlist as a Union private, witnessing the bloodiest battles of the Civil War.

    Jean says: "Engrossing book"
    "Engrossing book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I enjoyed this book as it provided another aspect of the Civil War that one rarely hears about. Abbott provides an alternate view of the Civil War by featuring previously untold stories of the impact women and civilians had on the war effort. She brings these individuals fully to life with passion for their causes. The subjects of Karen Abbott’s engrossing book are four women who worked undercover in the Civil War. Belle Boyd and Rose O’Neal Greenhow worked for the confederacy and Elizabeth Van Lew and Emma Edmondson worked for the Union. Boyd was 17 years old in 1861, known as “The Secesh Cleopatra” and La Bella Rebelle” she flirted and spied never making pronounced efforts to conceal her espionage activities. Emma Edmondson born in 1841 from Flint Michigan, by way of Canada, worked as a nurse and also infiltrated enemy terrain to gather intelligence. She masqueraded herself in various disguises to do this. She even disguised herself as a man and fought with the 2nd Michigan Infantry. Greenhow ran a spy ring out of Washington D.C. she also learned cipher and Morse code. In 2012 I read “Wild Rose” by Ann Blackman which gave an in-depth history of Greenhow’s life. Elizabeth Van Lew was of Richmond society. Her father was a prominent businessman and slave owner. She was one of Richmond’s wealthiest citizens. She had been educated in Philadelphia by an abolitionist governess. She ran a spy ring, learned to cipher and Morse code. Van Lew’s most impressive agent was Mary Jane Bower, her black servant.

    Abbott did meticulous research for the book and it is smoothly written and structured (chronologically) so as a certain amount of suspense is built in. The author’s research included letters, diaries and news accounts of the time. Abbott claims that as many as four hundred women both North and South were posing and fighting as men. The author also stated women were capable not only of significant acts of treason, but of executing them more deftly than men. Karen Abbott is a well known history author and a graduate of Villanova University.

    If you enjoy history and true stories of adventure and courage you will find this is just the book for you. I read this as an audio book with the use of “whispersync” so I could take advantage of the photographs in the book. Karen White did a good job narrating the book.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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