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Jean

I am an avid eclectic reader.

Santa Cruz, CA, United States | Member Since 2010

3558
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 665 reviews
  • 702 ratings
  • 1317 titles in library
  • 165 purchased in 2014
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  • Against All Enemies: JAG in Space, Book 4

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Jack Campbell
    • Narrated By Nick Sullivan
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (135)
    Performance
    (90)
    Story
    (92)

    Someone onboard the USS Michaelson is selling secrets, and to uncover the traitor, legal officer Lieutenant Paul Sinclair must walk the dangerous line between duty and honor.

    Jean says: "Catch a traitor"
    "Catch a traitor"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is book four in the Jag in Space series. I have enjoyed the series because I enjoy military law and military court room drama. There is some "action" at the beginning of the story as has been in each of the other books in the series but most of the story is leading up to the Court Marshall and then the Court Marshall. In this story most of the prior people in the series is off the USS Michaelson and at the end Lt Paul Sinclair also ends his tour of duty on the ship. This story was a bit different from the others as it has to do with espionage vs spying and the legal difference. Sinclair works with NCIS to set a trap to catch the person passing "secret" documents to another country but he is surprised by who was caught and has problem believing they got the right person. The story has suspense, humor, and family interaction. The story sets us up for next book at the Mars Station. Nick Sullivan does a good job narrating the story. Looking forward to the next book.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • The Return of George Washington: 1783-1789

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Edward Larson
    • Narrated By Mark Bramhall
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Although Washington is often overlooked in most accounts of the period, this masterful new history from Pulitzer Prize winner Edward J. Larson brilliantly uncovers Washington's vital role in shaping the Convention - and shows how it was only with Washington’s support and his willingness to serve as President that the states were brought together and ratified the Constitution, thereby saving the country.

    Jean says: "A readable history"
    "A readable history"
    Overall
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    This book covers the span of years between the end of the War and Washington’s presidency. This period is hardly mentioned by biographers or just called the wilderness years. The author said he felt these years helped Washington understand the weakness and problems facing the emerging country that helped him later as President. Larson writes about the Virginia planters putting his estate in order. When Washington traveled to check his frontier tracts in Pennsylvania and western Virginia he became worried. He found the inhabitants increasingly fractious and only sketchily loyal to the new nation. He worried that the western settlers may turn to Spain who controlled the mouth of the Mississippi river and the Western lands beyond.

    The author said Washington believed that only a common interest supported by a vigorous central government and nourished commercial ties, could prevent the fragmentation of the large country. He recommends the building of canals which would benefit both private investors and the Nation as a whole. Larson reveals Washington writing to Henry Knox saying “Good God! There are combustibles in every State, which a spark may set fire to!”
    When Congress called the Constitutional Convention in 1787 they wanted Washington to come and give stature to the proceedings. Washington was initially ambivalent about returning to politics. Washington sensed that division among the States threatened national liberty caused him to join the Constitutional convention in 1787. I really enjoyed Larson’s account by John Adams “John Adams groused, all anybody was likely to remember about the Revolution was “that Dr. Franklin’s electric rod smote the earth and out sprang George Washington. That Franklin electrified him and thence forward those two conducted all the policy, negotiations, legislation and War”

    Larson describes Washington’s medical and dental problems and the pressure for Washington to be the president. The author brings to life the founders daily struggles to draw up a document that would preserve individual liberty while ensuring the new government’s supreme power and sovereignty. Larson identifies Washington’s three goals—“respect abroad, prosperity at home and development westward.” Larson did a lot of research and then wrote a readable history of a little discussed period of Washington’s life.

    Edward J. Larson is a historian and legal scholar at Pepperdine University. He received the 1996 Pulitzer Prize for history for his book “Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America’s Continuing Debate over Science and Religion.” Mark Bramhall did a good job narrating the book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Narrow Road to the Deep North

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Richard Flanagan
    • Narrated By David Atlas
    Overall
    (32)
    Performance
    (28)
    Story
    (26)

    >In the despair of a Japanese POW camp on the Thailand - Burma Death Railway in 1943, Australian surgeon Dorrigo Evans is haunted by his love affair with his uncle's young wife two years earlier. His life is a daily struggle to save the men under his command from starvation, from cholera, from pitiless beatings - until he receives a letter that will change him forever.

    Jean says: "A Masterpiece"
    "A Masterpiece"
    Overall
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    This book just won the 2014 Man Booker prize. This was the first year that Americans we allow to compete for the British Award. Richard Flanagan is a Tasmanian, graduated from the University of Tasmania, awarded a Rhodes scholarship to Worcester College Oxford.

    Flanagan wrote the book in tribute to his late father, who survived the horrors of “the line” thousand more did not. Beaten and starving, riddled with malaria, cholera, ulcers and beriberi, allied POWs and local workers alike perished in the dense jungle between Thailand and Burma to build a railroad. Forced by their Japanese captures to build a railway between Thailand and Burma under appalling slave labor conditions caused the death of 13,000 POWs and 100,000 local workers. The book reminds me somewhat of the movie “Bridge over the River Kwai.”

    Flanagan historical novel protagonist is Dorrigo Evans an Australian Military surgeon. The book covers Evans life from childhood, education, war survival to post war life. During the War he is captured and sent to work on “the line” building the railroad. As a physician he treated both his fellow POWs and the Japanese Commander and his men. After the War Evans is haunted by the experience of the War, Flanagan’s writing reveals danger is omnipresent even after combat recedes, nature careless and monumental in its rains and bush fires.

    Flanagan’s historical novel is an examination of what it is to be a good man and a bad man in the same body and, above all, of how hard it is to live after survival. Flanagan is a fine writer and through the voices of a broad cast of characters, he takes us deep into the world of war in the jungles of Burma. Flanagan has written a magnificent historical novel of passion, horror and tragic irony. The story looks at terrible things and creates something beautiful. In researching to write the book Flanagan says he spent many hours interviewing his father obtaining details like the smell of the ulcer hut, the taste of sour rice. He also drew upon published histories and memoirs. For those interested in the history of World War II this is a must read book. David Atlas did a good job narrating the book.


    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II

    • UNABRIDGED (39 hrs and 18 mins)
    • By Doris Kearns Goodwin
    • Narrated By Nelson Runger
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (280)
    Performance
    (249)
    Story
    (250)

    No Ordinary Time describes how the isolationist and divided United States of 1940 was unified under the extraordinary leadership of Franklin Roosevelt to become the preeminent economic and military power in the world.

    BB says: "A rich and entertaining history"
    "Superb Dual Portrait"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I have been trying to clear my wish list of some books that have been there since the beginning of the year. A number on the list including this one I have kept postponing reading because they are so long. This book is about 40 hours.

    Goodwin sets out to tell the history of 1940 to 1945 through the lives of the Roosevelt’s and those who occupied the White House with them at a time when that building functioned more as a dormitory for famous personages than the President’s official residence. Guest included of course the Roosevelt’s daughter Ann and 4 sons, but Winston Churchill came and stayed for months at a time. Goodwin introduces us to a guest that has had less attention paid to her by historians the exiled Princess Martha of Norway. Princess Martha was born in Stockholm the daughter of Prince Carl of Sweden and Princess Ingeborg of Denmark. She married her cousin Crown Prince Olav of Norway in Oslo Cathedral on 21 March 1929; it was the first Royal Wedding in Norway in 340 years. When the Nazi overran Norway the Royal family first fled to Sweden then to England. Princess Martha and her three children were invited to come to the United States by Franklin and Eleanor for safety for the duration of the War. The Norwegian Americans helped host her. Prince Olav stayed most often in London helping with the War effort. Prince Olav’s mother was Princess Maud of Wales and father was King Haakon VII of Norway.

    The author did a prodigious amount of research to write this book and then she had the ability to convert all that abundance of information into a very readable story. No previous biography of the Roosevelt’s has given so complete a picture of how the private lives and political lives intersect uniquely for the Roosevelt’s. Goodwin portrays the history of WWII and so fully documents the domestic life of the nation during the international crisis. Narrating the events of the war from the vantage point of the White House, Goodwin makes it richly evident; Eleanor was a home front counterpart to Winston Churchill, a partner and provocateur whose relationship with FDR was rarely smooth and often frankly confrontational. Eleanor was her husband’s political and social conscience. Goodwin shows in stunning detail that Eleanor was even more; she was his astute political partner, lobbyist and goad. Goodwin depicts how a savvy, relentlessly involved First Lady incalculably enriched and shaped the political and social agenda of the Nation.

    The way Goodwin has pulled her myriad facts together serves to reinforce one’s sense of a monumental Presidency. It had its flaws, among which Goodwin numbers chiefly its failure to do more for the European Jews and its inability to stem the tide of hostility toward Japanese-Americans after Pearl Harbor. This is a superb dual portrait of the 32nd President and his first lady. Nelson Runger did a great job narrating the book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Embattled Rebel: Jefferson Davis as Commander in Chief

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By James M. McPherson
    • Narrated By Robert Fass
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    History has not been kind to Jefferson Davis. His cause went down in disastrous defeat and left the South impoverished for generations. If that cause had succeeded, it would have torn the United States in two and preserved the institution of slavery. Many Americans in Davis's own time and in later generations considered him an incompetent leader, if not a traitor.

    Jean says: "Interesting"
    "Interesting"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Civil War scholar and Pulitzer winning (“Battle Cry of Freedom” 1988) author James M McPherson has taken a fresh look at a subject with whom he is eminently familiar: the life and times of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. With open minds in short supply these days the author takes a big risk in challenging past postulations. Many still consider Davis a traitor.

    McPherson has methodically, without emotions written this short book. It is obvious he has conducted an enormous amount of research in preparation to write this story of Davis. This is not a biography in the traditional since as details of Davis’s life before Secession and his fate during Reconstruction are not covered.

    McPherson claims Davis was not an inept leader as many historians have claimed. Davis was a graduate of West Point and had served in the Mexican War. The author states that the south also had problems with its Generals. He compared the tentative George B. McClellan to the backpedaling Joseph E. Johnston. While he documents that Davis made his share of mistakes and was an impolitic politician, McPherson concludes that Davis devised a credible strategy for fight the war. The South’s material and manpower handicaps are well known, but McPherson list other obstacles such as the Southerners were anything but united. The “States Rights” mantra often inhibited coordinated military tactics. The author covers the 1862 threat by Arkansas to secede from the Confederacy and in 1863 North Carolina’s leaders favored negotiations. On top of this Rebel soldiers deserted in droves.

    McPherson’s overall evaluation of Davis is fair-minded. He criticizes Davis but also points out some favorable points. The book’s worth a read particularly for those interested in the Civil war. Robert Fass did a good job narrating the book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Robert Oppenheimer: A Life Inside the Center

    • UNABRIDGED (35 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Ray Monk
    • Narrated By Michael Goldstrom
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (45)
    Performance
    (42)
    Story
    (40)

    Robert Oppenheimer was among the most brilliant and divisive of men. As head of the Los Alamos Laboratory, he oversaw the successful effort to beat the Nazis in the race to develop the first atomic bomb – a breakthrough that was to have eternal ramifications for mankind and that made Oppenheimer the “Father of the Atomic Bomb.” But with his actions leading up to that great achievement, he also set himself on a dangerous collision course with Senator Joseph McCarthy and his witch-hunters. In Robert Oppenheimer: A Life Inside the Center, Ray Monk, author of peerless biographies of Ludwig Wittgenstein and Bertrand Russell, goes deeper than any previous biographer in the quest to solve the enigma of Oppenheimer’s motivations and his complex personality.

    david says: "Nearly Perfect"
    "A comprehensive biography"
    Overall
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    Story

    This lengthy (700 pages or 36 hours audio book) book aspires to be a comprehensive biography of Robert Oppenheimer. Monk covers more of the Oppenheimer’s work and love of physics than some other of the biographers.

    Monk goes into the German-Jewish tradition into which Oppenheimer was born and the ethical cultural belief that shaped his family and education. The author claims Oppenheimer was so brilliant that Harvard University forgot its anti-Semitic discrimination. Monk follows “Oppie’s” education from Harvard, Cambridge and to Gottingen University. The author tells of Oppenheimer fluency in French and his love of French literature, he also wrote poetry and learned Sanskrit. Oppenheimer also spoke German and Dutch. In 1927 Oppenheimer co wrote with Max Born a paper entitled “On the Quantum Theory of Molecules”. This paper helped “Oppie” become known in the field of Physics.

    The author cover in great detail Oppenheimer‘s teaching jobs at Caltech and the University of California Berkeley. When I took physics at UC Berkeley my professors were proud to have been students of Oppenheimer and E. Lawrence. He was able to pass on to his students his love of physics. Monk then covers the time at the lab in Los Alamos and the work on the bomb. The author covers the two pillars of Oppenheimer’s life. His scientific leadership role in WWII atomic bomb project and his status as a martyr of the McCarthy era after the 1954 security hearing that stripped him of his clearance.

    The remainder of the book Monk describes Oppenheimer’s years leading the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Monk provides by far the most thorough survey yet written of Oppenheimer’s physics and his work on neutron stars and black holes. His paper he wrote in 1938-39 was considered his most important theoretical work of his career. But “Oppie” died in 1967 before astronomical discoveries made his work relevant. He lost his chance for a Nobel Prize because they cannot be given posthumously. The book kept my attention throughout the 36 hours. Michael Goldstrom did a good job narrating the book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Imperfect Sword: The Lost Stars, Book 3

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 39 mins)
    • By Jack Campbell
    • Narrated By Marc Vietor
    Overall
    (79)
    Performance
    (77)
    Story
    (77)

    President Gwen Iceni and General Artur Drakon have successfully liberated the Midway Star System - but the former rulers of the Syndicate Worlds won’t surrender the region without a fight. The dictatorial regime has ordered the ex–Syndicate CEOs terminated with extreme prejudice and the system’s citizens punished for their defiance.Outnumbered and led by junior officers hastily promoted in the wake of the uprising, Midway’s warships are no match for the fleet massing and preparing to strike.

    Jean says: "Engrossing Space Battles"
    "Engrossing Space Battles"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I enjoyed Jack Campbell’s “Lost Fleet” series and have just keep reading right into his new sub series of the “Lost Stars” series. This is book three in the series. The series follows the trials and tribulations of the newly independent Midway Star System. We met this Star System and the people in the later books of the “Lost Fleet” series.

    Midway broke away from the Syndicated Worlds Empire and formed their independent Star System. President Gwen Iceni and head of Defense Artur Drakon are the key leaders. The people form a democracy for the first time in history of their system. Campbell allows this back ground to create lots of suspense, political intrigue, espionage as back drop to the major problem they face, the Syndicate wants to retake the Midway Star System. This of course, leads us to the area where Jack Campbell shines through. Campbell is the master of the space battles. His fleet movements techniques, the chess like moves of the fleet and the fighting in space kept me glued to my iPod. We meet up with Kommodor Marphissa, the female commander of the Midway fleet. She is turning into a most interesting character in the series as is the new Captain of the battleship Midway. The ending sets us up for the next book. Mark Vietor does as excellent job narrating the book.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Donovan: America’s Master Spy

    • UNABRIDGED (25 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Richard Dunlop, William Stephenson (foreward)
    • Narrated By Eric Martin
    Overall
    (15)
    Performance
    (15)
    Story
    (15)

    The fascinating biography of the man who laid the foundation for the CIA. One of the most celebrated and highly decorated heroes of World War I, a noted trial lawyer, presidential adviser and emissary, and chief of America’s Office of Strategic Services during World War II, William J. Donovan was a legendary figure. Donovan, originally published in 1982, penetrates the cloak of secrecy surrounding this remarkable man. The result is the definitive biography that Donovan himself had always expected Dunlop would write.

    Jean says: "Fascinating Biography"
    "Fascinating Biography"
    Overall
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    For the past 4 years I have been reading books about World War One, therefore I found the section about Donovan service in WWI most interesting. Donovan was the most decorated American soldier in WWI. The author covered Donovan’s WWI service in-depth and anyone interested in learning more about WWI would find this book helpful. I had just finished reading Caesar Commentaries so when I read that Donovan was reading a French translation of Caesar Commentaries with comments by Napoleon it jumped right out at me.

    Richard Dunlop was a journalist for the Chicago Tribune and a former OSS agent in World War II. He passed away in 1987. Sir William Stephenson was a Canadian soldier, spy master and oversaw British Intelligence for the Western Hemisphere during World War II. His code name was “Intrepid” and is thought to be the inspiration for James Bond.

    Dunlop and Stephenson’s book is a light weight biography of Donovan. This book was first published in 1982. The audio book was published in February of 2014. If you want a detailed and long book read Anthony Cave Brown’s “The Last Hero: Wild Bill Donovan.”
    The book covers an overview of Donovan’s life from childhood in Buffalo, New York and his education at Columbia University and Columbia Law School. During World War I Donovan served in the famous New York fighting 69th Irish Regiment where he received numerous decorations. Donovan was the only person to have received all four of the United States’ highest awards: The Medal of Honor, The Distinguished Service Cross, The Distinguished Service medal with two oak leaf clusters and the National Security Medal. He also was awarded the Silver Star and a Purple Heart with two Oak Clusters. He was awarded medals by all the Allied countries. At the end of World War One he left the Army as a Colonel. After World War One Donovan returned to his Wall Street law practice and he was active in New York politics as well as a friend of FDR.

    In WWII FDR created the OSS on the advice of William Stephenson, the British Intelligence officer for the Western Hemisphere. The United States had no intelligence network. FDR then appointed William Donovan as its head. The book covers an overview of Donovan’s work with the OSS during WWII. Donovan was promoted to Major General during WWII. Donovan continued to head the OSS under President Truman and when it was dissolved at the end of the war he helped Allen Dulles set up the CIA that Truman had just created.
    After World War II Donovan reverted to his life as a lawyer he was special assistant to Chief Prosecutor Telford Taylor at the Nuremburg War Crimes Tribunal. In 1953 President Dwight Eisenhower appointed Donovan as Ambassador to Thailand.

    Dunlop was given access to Donovan’s private papers and spoke with Donovan for hundreds of hours in preparation for writing this biography. The book is well written and most interesting. Eric Martin narrated this book. If you are interested in WWI or WWII history this is a book for you. This book provides an excellent overview of the life of William Donovan.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • A Call to Duty: Book I of Manticore Ascendant

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By David Weber, Timothy Zahn
    • Narrated By Eric Michael Summerer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (38)
    Performance
    (37)
    Story
    (37)

    Growing up, Travis Uriah Long yearned for order and discipline in his life...he two things his neglectful mother couldn’t or wouldn’t provide. So when Travis enlisted in the Royal Manticoran Navy, he thought he’d finally found the structure he’d always wanted so desperately. But life in the RMN isn’t exactly what he expected. Boot camp is rough and frustrating; his first ship assignment lax and disorderly; and with the Star Kingdom of Manticore still recovering from a devastating plague, the Navy is possibly on the edge of budgetary extinction.

    Jean says: "Astronautical adventure story"
    "Astronautical adventure story"
    Overall
    Performance
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    When I first read “On Basilisk Station” in 2009 David Weber had me hooked. I have read all the Honor Harrington series and now all the sub series. This book is to be book one in a new series about Manticore star system prior to the time of Honor. In fact the book starts not long after the founding of the Star Kingdom of Manticore. The Manticore wormhole junction has not been discovered yet.

    Our protagonist is Travis Uriah Long who has just enlisted in the Royal Manticore Navy at the age of 17. The existence of the Navy is under threat from political and budget problems. Travis is assigned to a ship going out of the Star system to check out the Havenit military surplus ship sale and to check out their shipbuilding capabilities. Then they meet the pirates and the action begins.

    Long’s brother Gavin is a junior peer in the House of Lords who wants to do away with the Navy. We are introduced to naval officer Edward Winton heir to the Manticorean Crown who is fighting to keep the Navy. The ending is a cliffhanger getting ready for the next book.

    The book is well written, full of action and interesting characters. The book contains technical details, military protocol, intrigue and political drama that you would expect in a Weber book. I think there is less world building political info dumping with Zahn as a co-author. The book is a fun read. Eric Michael Summerer did a good job narrating the book. If you enjoy military sci-fi or are a fan of Honorverse you will enjoy this book.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson

    • UNABRIDGED (24 hrs and 57 mins)
    • By S. C. Gwynne
    • Narrated By Cotter Smith
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (10)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (7)

    General Stonewall Jackson was like no one anyone had ever seen. In April of 1862 he was merely another Confederate general with only a single battle credential in an army fighting in what seemed to be a losing cause. By middle June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the Western World. He had given the Confederate cause what it had recently lacked: hope.

    Jean says: "Captivating"
    "Captivating"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    There have been a few biographies of Civil War Generals lately and this book can be added to the list. Everyone knows that little fazed General Thomas J. Jackson, at the first battle of Bull Run came the famous quote “Yonder stands Jackson like a stone wall.” S.C. Gwynne writes a very detailed and most readable biography of Jackson.

    The Virginian born Jackson went to West Point and fought in the Mexican-American War. Jackson was a professor of physics at the Virginia Military Institute when the Civil war started. Jackson was religious and was not proslavery but chose to fight for his State of Virginia rather than the Union.

    Jackson’s strategic innovations shattered the conventional wisdom of how war was waged; he was so far ahead of his time that his techniques would be studied generations into the future. The author shows that Jackson was a master of deception and movement. Jackson’s army could out march, outflank, out maneuver the Union Army. He was always outnumbered but he racked up victory after victory. The author delves deep into Jackson’s private life, including the lass of his first wife and his regimented personal habits.

    The book is written with the swiftly vivid narrative that is Gwynne’s hallmark and is rich in battle lore, biographical detail, and intense conflict between historical figures. The author’s battle scenes are marvels of description and action. The book is meticulously researched. Gwynne used both primary documents and highly respected secondary sources. Gwynne maintained his objectivity and presents an unbiased biography. One minor annoyance was the fact the author provided more information about the war and other people, he needed to stay more focused on his subject Stonewall Jackson.

    The author points out that Jackson went from obscurity to fame in twenty-four months in the Civil war. Jackson had a stunning effect on the course of the War. In 1863 at the Battle of Chancellorsville Jackson was shot by one of his sentries. His tragic death caused both the South and North to grieve. If you are interested in Civil War history you will enjoy this outstanding biography of one of the War’s greatest Generals. Cotton Smith narrated the book.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Steel World: Undying Mercenaries, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By B. V. Larson
    • Narrated By Mark Boyett
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1781)
    Performance
    (1661)
    Story
    (1670)

    In the 20th century Earth sent probes, transmissions, and welcoming messages to the stars. Unfortunately, someone noticed. The Galactics arrived with their battle fleet in 2052. Rather than being exterminated under a barrage of hell-burners, Earth joined their vast Empire. Swearing allegiance to our distant alien overlords wasn't the only requirement for survival. We also had to have something of value to trade, something that neighboring planets would pay their hard-earned credits to buy. As most of the local worlds were too civilized to have a proper army, the only valuable service Earth could provide came in the form of soldiers....

    D says: "Classic Space Opera"
    "Bizarre twisting plot"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is one of the many military Sci-Fi books. This is book one in a new series for Larson. This is my first Larson book so I am glad I managed to start with the first book in a new series. In this book the earth has been taken over by an advanced collection of races called the Galatics. Earth was given an ultimatum: join the Empire and produce a useful product to trade with the rest of the galaxy, or surrender the planet for more productive uses. Earth offered up mercenary soldiers.

    The story follows James McGill a young recruit to one of the mercenary outfits. We follow him through basic training and it to service. Larsen has created interesting and fairly dimensional characters. The tech is interesting and provides the story with some interesting philosophical and ethical questions.

    This is an easy to read and hard book to put down. Larson provides lots of action and bizarre twist and turns in the plot that kept my attention. The book is well written and the new series seems to be off to a good start. Mark Boyett narrated the book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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