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Jeffery S. Dibartolo

sobesooner

Lighthouse Point, FL USA | Member Since 2011

12
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 1 reviews
  • 39 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 7 purchased in 2014
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  • Empires of Trust: How Rome Built - and America Is Building - a New World

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Thomas F. Madden
    • Narrated By Richard Poe
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (139)
    Performance
    (43)
    Story
    (42)

    In Empires of Trust, Professor Thomas F. Madden explores surprising parallels between the Roman and American republics. By making friends of enemies and demonstrating a commitment to fairness, the two republics - both "reluctant" yet unquestioned super-powers - built empires based on trust. Madden also includes vital lessons from the Roman Republic's 100-year struggle with "terrorism."

    Thomas says: "A real eye opener"
    "Interesting but too myopic"
    Overall

    I found the premise of this book interesting and I agree with many of its concepts to varying degrees. However, I found the analysis of the expansion of the Roman empire to be far too simplistic and uniform - especially coming from such a scholarly writer - and the relentless comparison of the Roman and American spheres of influence as Empires of Trust reaches the point of monotony. In particular, the idea that the Romans were reluctant empire-builders is dubious at best - certainly not the consensus viewpoint of ancient scholars. Of particular interest, nevertheless, are the following: (1) the comparison of American and Roman morality and religious values (2) the comparison of Rome's relationship to to the Old World (Greece) to America's relationship with the Old World (Europe) and (3) the comparison of America's struggle against radical Muslim fundamentalism to Rome's war against radical Zionists. Whether or not one agrees with Prof. Madden's conclusions, this book is worth consideration.

    12 of 13 people found this review helpful

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