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PHIL

San Diego, CA, United States | Member Since 2011

ratings
191
REVIEWS
185
FOLLOWING
2
FOLLOWERS
144
HELPFUL VOTES
451

  • Getting Started in Options

    • ABRIDGED (3 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Michael C. Thomsett
    • Narrated By Nelson Runger
    Overall
    (147)
    Performance
    (50)
    Story
    (46)

    Getting Started in Options arms you with the facts you need to make informed decisions about choosing stocks, tracking options, selling calls, understanding and controlling risk, and much more.

    K. Harirchian says: "'Getting Started in Options' is just that"
    "A well-titled book, a good first intro"
    Overall
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    I found this a good entry point to the subject. I like the clarity and logic of the explanations -- a sort of walk through facets of simplified trader-logic. However, it is only a beginning, and after learning this I would not "get started" in the sense of tossing myself to the tender mercies of counter-parties who know the more modern math tools to create the other side of deals. Continuing the learning curve about that, I am happy to see at audible a nice popularization to start on, "Pricing the Future: Finance, Physics, and the 300-Year Journey to the Black-Scholes Equation".

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Taking of Getty Oil: The Full Story of the Most Spectacular - and Catastrophic - Takeover of All

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 49 mins)
    • By Steve Coll
    • Narrated By Steven Cooper
    Overall
    (9)
    Performance
    (9)
    Story
    (9)

    A true story of family, ambition, and greed in the most bitter and controversial takeover struggle in business history. The high-stakes fight between Texaco and Pennzoil to take over Getty Oil is a startling and intriguing case involving family infighting, courtroom drama, and corporate intrigue that ends in bankruptcy and the largest damages award in American history.

    PHIL says: "Dazzling on so many levels"
    "Dazzling on so many levels"
    Overall
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    Story

    Gripping elements abound: the absurdities of vast amounts of multi-generational wealth tumbling from the dead hand of a wildly creative-ruthless-disruptive patriarch into widely varied (and wildly eccentric) hands; the wealth-and-prestige-oozing scene rapidly developing a rich ecosystem of alliances, schemers, hangers-on, betrayals, awful legal conundrums trapping the most calculating people; swirling pools and eddies filled with lawyers, syncophants (some in very expensive trappings!), corporate chiefs, raiders, swarming in all directions and alignments, clawing for the glittering (or rather, oily) prize; and the climactic perfect storm systems one can see, brewing, frothing, forming up and approaching, to sweep these characters into fortune or chaos, willy-nilly.
    Yet, there is a clear determinism in the sequence of events, a logical flow, but unpredictable, in the way impenetrable chaos is deterministic. It makes sense in the (skillful) telling, but midstream, we can't tell where it (and the characters) will wind up. I.e., this is a great explication of real life, with a kicker of billions of dollars whipped into the mix, a sort of accellerant.
    All this is told in meticulous, lucid, businesslike detail. The author understands the legal structures and the stakes, and wastes barely a word describing each moment. The tempo delights me. This is not a sloppily written book. All the weirdness and hilarities of narrative twists are somehow laid out in a sober and constantly understandable sequence. Despite all this, if you don't like corporate/legal matters, you might not enjoy this so much. But for me, the colorful stories of a truly weird family provide a strangely hilarious relief peppered all through the sophisticated structures and plot turns. I can't get enough of it, and fortunately this is a prolific author. On deck: The Exxon-Mobil book. I have a new favorite author.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs)
    • By Jonathan Darman
    • Narrated By Corey M. Snow
    Overall
    (14)
    Performance
    (13)
    Story
    (13)

    The liberal and the conservative. The deal - making arm twister and the cool communicator. The Texas rancher and the Hollywood star. Opposites in politics and style, Lyndon Johnson and Ronald Reagan shared a defining impulse: to set forth a grand story of America, a story in which he could be the hero. In the tumultuous days after the Kennedy assassination, Johnson and Reagan each, in turn, seized the chance to offer the country a new vision for the future.

    mick says: "Good, but could have been great"
    "Author has great feel for narrative"
    Overall
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    There is a great feel here for the moment, for phrases to capture it, for details large and small that fit, for the cadence of public events and actors in them, as high drama. Another reviewer has observed the author describes thoughts and nuances of inner life that are not explicitly sourced or documented, thus perhaps speculative to some degree. Yet, in that, this work shines with the author's talents (and deep apprenticeship; this takes immersion in great writers' and speakers' great works, one can hear echoing here). And these excursions into others' thoughts and strategies are consistently, highly credible. Every line has surpassing lyrical grace. As history, for its non-academic style, it is detailed and epic and captivating. I wonder whether this is self-consciously Darman's audition as a presidential speechwriter (he would have the job in a heartbeat if I was deciding it), but this would not detract from its qualities. For long stretches of the book I feel seamlessly as if I am each of the characters, facing their defining moments, deliberating, wary of enemies, scorched by memories and fears of failure, and making those decisions that became history across its biggest canvas. And the choice of the central non-biographical topic is great to me: the biggest of issues that this society has faced, the main competing visions of our economic, social and historical identity. I only wish I had the skills to describe these things as well as Darman does.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Book on Mergers and Acquisitions

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By James Scott
    • Narrated By Mike Giunta
    Overall
    (7)
    Performance
    (6)
    Story
    (6)

    This is a step by step "how to" guide that should be in the arsenal of every CEO and senior executive. Whether a company is public or private, there are few methods of rapid expansion that can rival a powerful Mergers and Acquisitions campaign. This audiobook offers easy to follow insight into the identification, due diligence and facilitation of a prototypical merger or acquisition.

    PHIL says: "Lots of corporate law in a compact form"
    "Lots of corporate law in a compact form"
    Overall
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    Minute for minute, this is a great example of the audio format, and great value. It is a very extensive survey (and refresher) of many corporate issues, in plain, commonly used and understandable terms. I plan to re-listen to this from time to time. I notice there is one by this author on IPOs also and I'm anxious to hear it.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Offshore Banking & Foreign Bank Account Reporting (FBAR) Guide: Bank Smart, Stay Compliant, Avoid FBAR Penalties

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 16 mins)
    • By Curt Matsen
    • Narrated By Phil Baker
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    There are several benefits of offshore online banking. Learn the pros and cons of offshore Internet banking from firsthand experience as well as critical mistakes to avoid. This book discusses what offshore banking is, why to consider it in the first place, who it is for, its advantages and disadvantages, and some important things to know and keep in mind before getting involved with offshore banking.

    PHIL says: "A good introductory account"
    "A good introductory account"
    Overall
    Performance
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    This brief tutorial on offshore banking of course omits various advanced complexities. But it is a fine first look. The author constantly has an eye on compliance issues which is a good approach, because this is not a place for people to tread uninformed.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Muhammad: A Prophet for Our Time

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Karen Armstrong
    • Narrated By Karen Armstrong
    Overall
    (79)
    Performance
    (50)
    Story
    (46)

    From the best-selling author of Islam: A Short History comes an important addition to the Eminent Lives book series. A former Roman Catholic nun and winner of a Muslim Public Affairs Council Media Award, Karen Armstrong shows how Muhammad's life can teach us a great deal about our world. More is known about Muhammad than any other major religion founder, yet he remains mysterious.

    Amazon Customer says: "down to the man"
    "Informative, calmly told"
    Overall
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    This account sticks to its knitting in the sense that it does not go far and wide into other contexts, such as vast historical panoramas, and it takes Muhammad as it finds him within his own times, place and cultural context. Of course his influence and impact on those things were vast, but we go into the narrative step by step, from the relative smallness of his beginnings through the daunting challenges at each turn, each level oif personal maturity and achievement, and the devising of solutions (or to take him on his own terms, the imparting of revelations) that worked, such as they did, within that time and place. The author has an even-handed, reasonably sympathetic stance in this work; it is not a polemic trying to aggressively adversely confront all of this. For example, the reality of the polygamy (and the respective characters and behaviors of his wives) is merely explained calmly as a part of the sequence of events, in its local context of the customs of the time and place. Those customs in the area of Mecca are explained well, helping to give meaning and context to Muhammad's actions and character.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Tao Te Ching: A New English Version

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 43 mins)
    • By Lao Tzu, Stephen Mitchell
    • Narrated By Stephen Mitchell
    Overall
    (419)
    Performance
    (317)
    Story
    (316)

    In 81 brief chapters, Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching, or Book of the Way, provides advice that imparts balance and perspective, as well as a serene and generous spirit. It teaches us how to work for the good with the effortless skill that comes from being in accord with the Tao: the basic principle of the universe.

    Jason says: "Wonderful translation and reading, but..."
    "A "new" favorite Tao te Ching"
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    I have been reading versions of Tao te Ching for decades. This is a balanced, serene, insightful one, that I think fits modern sensibilities better than any I've read (in several instances giving phrasings that better expressed ideas I had groped for, but not fully reached with other versions). It has a neat, non-frilly clarity that is ideal. The sound quality is good as far as the voice but I can hear quiet background noise going on and off as each little segment ends and the next starts. It is mildly distracting, but no big deal.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Rehnquist Choice: The Untold Story of the Nixon Appointment that Redefined the Supreme Court

    • ABRIDGED (6 hrs)
    • By John W. Dean
    • Narrated By Boyd Gaines, John W. Dean
    Overall
    (34)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (5)

    Hear the stunning story behind the Nixon appointment that redefined the Supreme Court - written by Nixon's White House Counsel John Dean, and featuring newly released White House recordings.

    inearthsha says: "Insightful look at Nixon and the Court"
    "Nixon and staff behind scenes making decisions"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Here is a fly-on-the-wall, blow-by-blow of the Nixon and his team in action. Richard Nixon is a boundless case study, this eternally snarky, coarse, calculating poker player. Everything and everyone is another card to "play." Here are the ethnic and gender slurs, perhaps an echo of the onetime supply officer in the WW2 Pacific playing cards with his buddies, with a layer of ever-calculating scrappy lawyer on top. At moments, he literally growls and snarls. A terrific editing job has been done, moving seamlessly between the various players. Yes, I take anyone's self-justifying narrative with a huge grain of salt, and that includes John Dean's, and the later book makes me wince at moments. But that does not spoil the piece, because so much of its content is so well documented (and even includes tapes of the actual conversations). I think it's time for me to rummage through some more of these Nixon "straight up" audios.
    I see another sub-plot here too, quite pertinent to today's evaporating privacy issues for politicians as well as everyone else. Nixon I believe anticipated his oval office tapes would be confidentially his alone, to vet and filter out at his leisure for the historical record. The press has always served the legitimate interest in widely disclosing matters of public news interest (of course alongside its profit motives). Nixon for his part was obsessed with the press and that dynamic -- and they were going for the jugular with him, and all kinds of people were leaking supposedly private information. This, mixed with his personality, brought us Watergate. But he was not completely unhinged -- his frustrations had serious elements for us to ponder. The public cannot demand every utterance of every government official at the moment it is made. But in our everything-networked world, are we losing something, with microphones everywhere, document retention rules? Can any of us function in a high pressure situation where we are every moment presumably speaking to eternal history as represented by an army of adversaries over long periods analyzing and parsing every word? This has been an issue not only for Nixon but for both Clintons. Political opponents on either side are quick to make hay from these things, but they should reflect that they live in glass houses themselves, in terms of a world that watches every event and never forgets. It is not new, but its intensity and these particular dynamics are recent. And much of this started here, as we can hear and consider. Our civilization is maturing through this tech revolution, and some will find themselves in a glare unimagined.
    As a last remark: if judicial matters are of little interest to you, you might be bored. This is certainly not as "juicy" as secret bombing programs and such. But for me, it is rich.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Man Who Made Wall Street: Anthony J. Drexel and the Rise of Modern Finance

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 17 mins)
    • By Dan Rottenberg
    • Narrated By J.M. Ross
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    The second son of an Austrian emigre, Anthony Drexel (1826-1893) soon established himself as the preeminent financial mind in the Philadelphia currency brokerage his father began in 1838. Shunning publicity, self-promotion, and high-profile public accolades (he declined President Ulysses S. Grant's invitation to become Secretary of the Treasury), Drexel initiated a partnership with J. P. Morgan and his father, Junius, that became the most powerful financial combination of its age.

    Jean says: "He tamed the bulls and bears"
    "LIke its subject, quietly shines"
    Overall
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    Story

    As the book opened, its wanderings through the story of Anthony Drexel's father had me worried. Here we were with a vain young vagabond painter walking aimlessly around the mountain hamlets of Napoleonic Europe. But the point of the story, and the broad canvas across which it happened, quickly enough came into focus. (That gullible young man, Francis Drexel, in grand American fashion, would end his life a venerable Philadelphia banker.) His son, Anthony Drexel, was a man of extraordinary business sense wrapped in an outward plainness and modesty that modern sensibilities might gloss over. But the story unfolding all around him, in which he was time and again a major player, was at the heart of American business and financial history and politics in his times. Here, right down the street, is Jay Cooke, emerging marketing wizard of mass bond issues for the Civil War, later to crash and burn spectacularly in an insanely ambitious cross-continent railroad adventure; General (then President) Grant; all the banking firms and families of the times here and in Europe, and of course, Anthony's associates, Junius and John Pierpont (J.P.) Morgan. In Drexel's virtuoso conception and building of his business relations with the Morgans, the confused younger Pierpont's life was changed at a critical point and redirected into its historical, planet-affecting path, still affecting us today. The personalities, conversations and steps in all this are lucidly told, easy to follow, and the narrator is ideal: clear and not flashy. Here we see not the march of business history (from the old family structures into more modern entities, ideally explained through actual decisions and deals, as when A. Drexel must favor partner J.P. Morgan's visionary business decision over his own partner-brother's wishes, on the eve of the crash of 1873). And on another level, for the business organization afficionado, we get a great sketch of such inspiring things as the ideal expression of private partnership based on character, in its most dynamic workings (between Drexel and the Morgans, especially J.P.), with scarcely a partnership agreement document in sight. (One can see by comparison how the sprawling structures of capital and control nowadays, as Adam Smith suspected, can undercut accountability and integrity.) We experience these things through the intimacy of personal correspondence, and then, time and again, the viewpoint seamlessly pulls back and shows a wider tableau. Through it all, as the biggest backdrop, we get a very economical and listenable explanation of major events and innovations of the later-mid 1800s in finance, fit perfectly with the details of the story, and the larger context of business history. (This is the most coherent explanation of these broader events among the dozens of related books I have read). This book is first-rate. Bravo!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Church and the Jews: The Lectures of Dr. David Neiman

    • ORIGINAL (5 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By David Neiman
    • Narrated By David Neiman
    Overall
    (6)
    Performance
    (6)
    Story
    (6)

    Dr. David Neiman's lecture series, The Church and The Jews traces the intimate and troubled relationship between the Christian Church and the Jewish people. The series starts with the Council of Nicea in 325 A.D. when the Catholic Church was founded and takes us through the Crusades, the Disputations of the 13th century, the Spanish Inquisition, and the Reformation.

    PHIL says: "A terrific display of the power of lecture"
    "A terrific display of the power of lecture"
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    The story here spans the arrival of Christianity as an official religion of Rome in the 300s, through Martin Luther's times. As my scholarship into these times in Muslim, Jewish and Christian spheres deepens, it is refreshing to have good lectures between heavier forays. These are not as ponderous as deeply scholarly books, and yet deep enough to give me a strong start into the subjects. As such they empower and accelerate my learning, with the light touch that lecture provides. There is much on European political history and particularly the Catholic church and its greatest thinkers in these times, alongside the Jewish thinkers and leaders. This work effortlessly, gracefully spans politics, philosophy, law, and theology, showing sensible links between them, as a great professor can do. The Jewish migrations and various related actions of Jews and Christians alike suddenly make a lot more sense to me, showing that Professor Neiman was a deeply thoughtful scholar of all sides of these matters. Time and again we receive fine insights into the actors in their times, finding themselves facing real-world problems unfolding in real time, to solve (often imperfectly, sometimes disastrously) with doctrines and the tools at hand.
    He seems unfailingly charitable to the Jews' plights and perspectives, as I suppose I could expect, and I'm not scholar enough to completely critique this. Nevertheless, I never feel I am being shown one-dimensional Christians. Everyone is credibly an actual person in a world of fast-emerging, tough issues. My knowledge has gained immensely.
    I would contrast the next work of his I am hearing, "The Jews in History." The style and approach are somewhat different. In "The Church and the Jews," some basic history knowledge and curiosity is all that is needed, and many characters, institutions, doctrines, terms, and concepts are lucidly and patiently explained. "The Jews in History" would seem to require a bit more pre-existing background in the listener, in the basic stories of the Torah, for example. E.g., we are expected to know some detail of the stories of Joseph and Moses, to make sense of the comments. It has a more familiar tone, and has less patient, smoothly accessible structure and continuity as is found in "The Church and the Jews." Yet, it has a quality and depth all its own.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Best Way to Rob a Bank Is to Own One: How Corporate Executives and Politicians Looted the S&L Industry

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By William K. Black
    • Narrated By Scotty Drake
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    In this expert insider's account of the savings and loan debacle of the 1980s, William Black lays bare the strategies that corrupt CEOs and CFOs - in collusion with those who have regulatory oversight of their industries - use to defraud companies for their personal gain.

    PHIL says: "Bank frauds and their pet regulators, 1980s-2000s"
    "Bank frauds and their pet regulators, 1980s-2000s"
    Overall
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    Another title might be, "mud wrestling in a tangled snake pit over the privilege to steal other people's money." Yet another, "a bipartisan masterpiece of machinations and sleaze: following the bread crumbs, naming names, good and bad, and among the bad, the incredibly slippery." A few slither away with big money, and the final bill, in a familiar story, is handed to the taxpayer, with Congress hacks helping the perps, greatly enlarging that bill, and altogether making us all measurably poorer for life.
    This may be a by-product of every go-go era, and go-go-eras have produced some great good for the public. This book focuses on the exploiters of such times, and I think we probably have another such prosperous phase of the cycle coming (so watch out).
    Did Alan Greenspan really say he thought there shouldn't be fraud laws (as attributed here, as having been remarked to Brooksley Born?) If so, wow.
    People plus econ theory can go to some very abstract, exotic places. That is, until one realizes: many hacks in the private and public sectors have their bread fundamentally buttered with information asymmetry: they actively embrace the view of a world of suckers and the suckered. The manipulators (and their house theory-propounders) make huge fortunes from it, want it, and must think the defrauded get what they deserve. Why should we slow down and take note of the fools who just haven't paid the information costs of being kingpins (and thus, in a sense, deserve their losses, and bargained for them)?
    It is an interesting ethos and set of questions. Some version of it is also a central cash flow machine for a huge political and business elite, despite the protestations of many (hauling out the easy bumper sticker phrase) that this is merely the magical free market in operation. (Adam Smith knew better, castigating fraud and what is now called agency problems, but who really reads him? Might as well watch the adult cartoons on TV creatively cherry-picking his writings.) After all, the market finds its equilibrium at some point, and by then, the winners have unassailable amounts of winnings, free and clear and oh-so-cleverly stashed. The armies of well-greased syncophant experts see to that. Except that the defrauded in this latest round of this phenomenon (2008) are unprecedented numbers of the rest of us, especially via the system of government-(taxpayers)-as-insurance-for-the-macro-economy joined at the hip with continuing permissiveness of fraud. Watch it unfold again now: now whenever everybody's fear of macro-disaster subsides, the next echo of this familiar financing bubble will take off. Since interest rates can't and won't be lowered soon, the answer (proposed by many) to juice up the economy will be sharp financial deregulation. And again, as in this book, the downsizing of things like bank examiner budgets. The regulated businesses will again be touted by regulators as "our clients." And surprise, into many cronies' pockets, vast amounts of cash will flow. Everybody will feel (at least potentially) rich and studly for a little while, then comes the inevitable denouement. (I can't assume from this small sample that the cycles will continue to shorten and steepen. But it concerns me.)
    And it feeds back into both major parties' coffers, and some very big political names, keeping the dance going longer, for bigger looting and losses, as this book shows.
    This book spends most of its time in a blow-by-blow of the '80s S&L affair in which this author was a prime participant from the government enforcement side. (This is not the entire history: the inquisitive reader can look for more background as to why S&Ls were in the ditch they were, for which the answer SEEMED to some, and some in good faith, to deregulate, to give some slack to the floundering industry, to climb out of its ditch. As usual, bipartisan fingerprints were all over the mess from way back. That larger history isn't quite all here, and isn't the apparent intention of this book, which is much more about the direct trench warfare.)
    People with an interest in this subject and its players will find it pretty absorbing (some will find it maddening, either at the author and those he praises, or those he pillories, or maybe some mix thereof). Having shown the most connected '80s crooks dispatched finally, after a titanic struggle finally winding up in climactic hearing scenes in Congress, it picks up speed to tie together a bigger picture historically and economically (from the author's particular viewpoint) in about the last one-fifth of the book. He is quite critical of public choice theory and other conservative concepts that, I think, can be very meaningful and important. But I don't get the sense of a blinkered ideologue.
    It was my honor to meet one of this book's heroes, Edwin Gray, later Bank Board Chairman, informally, in the early Reagan era. He infuriated a lot of well-connected people by actually doing his job, even after severe pressure was brought by many powerful and connected people. We can compare this civil servant, ungainly character traits and all, with the party hack later put into the regulators' ranks who, per the author, could not shut up about the fancy tricked-out interior and sound system of arch-crook-banker Charles Keating's jet. The latter sort of naive young apparatchiks were intentionally salted into the ranks of the regulators, by those for whom government is always and everywhere nothing but "the problem." Why not, in that vein, hire cops who are in awe of Pablo Escobar's car collection?
    And yet, next to the magnitude of crony cash flows these days, and the bitter rhetoric and broken consensus-reaching process, one can feel nostalgic for Reagan and his ability to work across the political spectrum and often lead in very good and productive directions, too. He was not simply a one-trick pony, as many of the cartoonish supposed imitators are now. But in the shadow of any and every system, some strange critters can grow.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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