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A. Christian

ratings
21
REVIEWS
4
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
18

  • Righteous Indignation: Excuse Me While I Save the World

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By Andrew Breitbart
    • Narrated By Jeremy Guskin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (397)
    Performance
    (291)
    Story
    (293)

    Known for his network of conservative websites that draws millions of readers everyday, Andrew Breitbart has one main goal: to make sure the "liberally biased" major news outlets in this country cover all aspects of a story fairly. Breitbart is convinced that too many national stories are slanted by the news media in an unfair way. In Righteous Indignation, Breitbart talks about the key issues that Americans face, how he has aligned himself with the Tea Party, and how one needs to deal with the liberal news world head on.

    Larry says: "Very insightful!"
    "Bright Book"
    Overall

    This book was very well written and extremely well narrated. Guskin sounds a lot like Breitbart, but less sleepy. I thought chapter 6 about the origins of the left-wing presence in modern academia and popular culture was excellent and served as the only real educational portion of the book. The rest is essentially an autobiography of a mostly uneventful early life, but one that continues to accelerate with digitally charged later experiences that cover many exciting major media events of the recent years with an exacting behind-the-scenes perspective. The book also reveals the origins of the Drudge Report, Huffingtonpost, and Breitbart's own websites. Andrew confesses his dirty little sin of internet addiction that began during the scandal-ridden Clinton era and explains how Arianna Huffington succeeded in seeing the body of Larry Lawrence disinterred from Arlington National Cemetery against Bill's objections. While shredding the media Andrew shows how he used Arianna's proven strategy of media manipulation to make the most of the epic work of James O'Keefe's and Hanna Giles' undercover operation exposing ACORN which ended in the "in-name-only" destruction of that cursed organization and it's congressional de-funding. Many other great stories are told in this book and it's a great use of a credit.
    My only criticism is that like many on the right today Andrew fails to see the direct connection between Biblical Christianity and the principles on which the right rests which limits his book's scope and usefulness. In order to augment his notes in chapter 6 the author would do well to research the origins of "criticism" farther back in history starting with the French, German, and English Biblical Textual Critics as covered in the books "The King James Bible and the Modern Versions" Harvestime Books, Vance Ferrell (available online) and "Gipp's : An Understandable History of the Bible" Daystar Publishing, Samuel Gipp Th.D.

    9 of 17 people found this review helpful
  • The Maltese Falcon

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Dashiell Hammett
    • Narrated By Eric Meyers
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (597)
    Performance
    (544)
    Story
    (549)

    Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon, first serialized in a magazine in 1930, is best known through the iconic Humphrey Bogart film of 1941. But it was the book that created the classic "noir" genre with its tough private detective threading his cool way between the criminals and the law. Sam Spade, the private eye solving the mystery of the Maltese statuette, was the template for Philip Marlowe and a host of others…. but they come no more shrewd and cunning with Hammett peppering the text with one-liners.

    Kathi says: "Outstanding American classic!"
    "Tastes like Soap"
    Overall

    Foul language throughout and the movie was much better. I would not recommend this one at all.

    9 of 74 people found this review helpful
  • The Shining

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 54 mins)
    • By Stephen King
    • Narrated By Campbell Scott
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1554)
    Performance
    (696)
    Story
    (710)

    Why we think it’s a great listen: You may have thought the movie was scary, but this is pure Stephen King as it was meant to be experience – performed frighteningly well by Campbell Scott. First published in 1977, The Shining quickly became a benchmark in the literary career of Stephen King. This tale of a troubled man hired to care for a remote mountain resort over the winter, his loyal wife, and their uniquely gifted son slowly but steadily unfolds as secrets from the Overlook Hotel's past are revealed.

    Eileen says: "Much better than the movie..."
    "Wendy, give me the bat."
    Overall

    This had the worst language I've ever heard in an audiobook. It was an offense to my very ears. The story was painfully dull and like many of King's books the ending was overdone. The movie starring Jack Nicholson and Shelley Duvall, which was made when Hollywood still had actors, was much better than the book. Normally it's the other way around, but as with a number of cases with King the movie was better.

    0 of 12 people found this review helpful
  • The Good Guy

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Dean Koontz
    • Narrated By Richard Ferrone
    Overall
    (1326)
    Performance
    (226)
    Story
    (233)

    Timothy Carrier, having a beer after work at his friend's tavern, enjoys drawing eccentric customers into amusing conversations. But the jittery man who sits next to him tonight has mistaken Tim for someone very different and passes to him a manila envelope full of cash. "Ten thousand now. You get the rest when she's gone."

    Dawn says: "Dawn"
    "Killer Drones"
    Overall

    Like many Koontz books the dialog drags on and on while the characters are in grave danger. They chit chat and discuss their lives while being shot at. Not one that I would recommend.

    0 of 6 people found this review helpful

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