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Erik Fosshage

Albuquerque, NM USA | Member Since 2000

42
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 5 reviews
  • 605 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 13 purchased in 2014
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  • Longitudes & Attitudes: Exploring the World After September 11

    • ABRIDGED (5 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Thomas L. Friedman
    • Narrated By Thomas L. Friedman
    Overall
    (159)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (22)

    In 2002, Thomas L. Friedman won his third Pulitzer Prize "for his clarity of vision, based on extensive reporting, in commenting on the worldwide impact of the terrorist threat" after the attacks of September 11, 2001. This virtually unprecedented recognition underlines Friedman's unique ability to interpret and illuminate the world for American readers clearly, insightfully, and memorably.

    David says: "listen to this book"
    "Surprisingly informative despite liberal bias"
    Overall

    I went into this book with a lot of skepticism because of the author's traditional ultra-liberal bias. But I did have an open mind while reading this collection of essays, as I thought it important to get multiple viewpoints of the war on terrorism - especially from a journalist as well traveled as Mr. Friedman.

    Mr. Friedman's depth of knowledge on a variety of Middle East issues is extensive, as expected. But what I found most informative was his perspectives on the opinions and biases of Middle Eastern citizens (especially from Saudi Arabia) that he has known for years through his travels. It is these misconceptions and propaganda-fed agendas of Arab intellectuals, as well as their small middle class, that is most enlightening to westerners. I also expected Mr. Friedman to be more of an apologist for US actions, but this was not the case and he has no qualms identifying the errors of thinking (and actions) from all sides in the Middle East conflicts.

    I was pleasantly surprised by the perspectives and attitudes in this work. The only thing lacking is true depth of the issues, as this book isn't much more than a collection of his NY Times articles over the span of a year after September 11th. An extra diary of thoughts and opinions is included that has not been released previously, but to those who are already familiar with his articles this probably isn't reason enough to buy this book. Since I was a new to Mr. Friedman's work, I found the book informative and well balanced. 4 stars.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Of Paradise and Power: America and Europe in the New World Order

    • UNABRIDGED (2 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Robert Kagan
    • Narrated By Robertson Dean
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (54)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    When historians want to find out about the ideas that motivated American foreign policy in the early years of the twenty-first century, they would do well to read this book. Robert Kagan has formally set out a case for unilateralism on the part of the United States, as opposed to the multilateralism now characteristic of Europe. Kagan believes that the United States can disregard a weak Europe, and have a free hand in pursuing its global interests.

    Erik Fosshage says: "Quick and pithy listen"
    "Quick and pithy listen"
    Overall

    This is an excellent synopsis of the high-level differences between modern European and American foreign policy. Kagan deftly weaves his premise that America and Europe are diverging in their interests, and not necessarily to their mutual detriment. While written from an American (and conservative) perspective, I found it to be fairly well unbiased and non-partisan for all ideologues to enjoy. Kagan also does an excellent job of making his case in a short space, where lesser authors would take much longer.

    9 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • The Alibi

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Sandra Brown
    • Narrated By Dennis Redfield
    Overall
    (234)
    Performance
    (69)
    Story
    (68)

    With sensitivity and insight into the human condition, Sandra Brown creates a forceful psychological portrait of a man in moral turmoil, who must make difficult choices betweenn his personal passions and the demands of his conscience.

    Erik Fosshage says: "Another great work by a master storyteller"
    "Another great work by a master storyteller"
    Overall

    This is a great murder mystery by Sandra Brown, a master storyteller with the gift of intrigue, plot twists, deception, and the inevitable shocking conclusion. She is a wordsmith with both characters and locations, always making us feel as if we are there with her as she describes settings with a tapestry of colors, senses, desires, and subtle nuances. Old fans will recognize her trademark style in this novel, and newcomers will soon be captivated by her talents.

    18 of 18 people found this review helpful
  • The Gulag Archipelago: Volume I Section II: The Prison Industry, Perpetual Motion

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
    • Narrated By Frederick Davidson
    Overall
    (88)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (18)

    In this masterpiece, Solzhenitsyn has orchestrated thousands of incidents and individual histories into one narrative of unflagging power and momentum. Written in a tone that encompasses Olympian wrath, bitter calm, savage irony, and sheer comedy, it combines history, autobiography, documentary and political analysis as it examines in its totality the Soviet apparatus of repression from its inception following the October Revolution of 1917. This volume involves us in the innocent victim's arrest and preliminary detention and the stages by which he is transferred across the breadth of the Soviet Union to his ultimate destination: the hard-labor camp.

    Erik Fosshage says: "Continues the epic story, but drags on a bit long"
    "Continues the epic story, but drags on a bit long"
    Overall

    From the author's first words: 'You are under arrest', The Gulag Archipelago takes the reader on the colossal journey through Soviet Russia's prison industry. Alternatively witty, serious, brutally horrific, and gut-wrenchingly forthright, the author details the entire prison experience from initial arrest, kangaroo trials, and inhumane prison overcrowding in this Volume I installment of Stalin's 'sewage system' of greater Russia.

    Solzenhitsyn's epic account is divided into 7 parts, with the first ("The Prison Industry") by far the longest... and encompassing the entirety of Volume I, Section I. Section II continues the inhumane march through detainment, transit prisons, and the absurdity of "the people's tribunals", but gets bogged down in the definitive accounts of specific trials. I encourage the reader to stick with the story long enough to arrive at Part II "Perpetual Motion" - or the long road to exile.

    I give this installment only 4 stars because the first part of the book drags on a bit too long to keep the reader's attention focused.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • The Gulag Archipelago: Volume I Section I: The Prison Industry, Perpetual Motion

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
    • Narrated By Frederick Davidson
    Overall
    (145)
    Performance
    (17)
    Story
    (18)

    In this masterpiece, Solzhenitsyn has orchestrated thousands of incidents and individual histories into one narrative of unflagging power and momentum. He combines history, autobiography, documentary and political analysis as it examines in its totality the Soviet apparatus of repression from its inception following the October Revolution of 1917. Hear other volumes from The Gulag Archipelago

    Gene says: "Listening to the Gulag A. in Moscow"
    "An exciting start to an epic story"
    Overall

    From the author's first words: 'You are under arrest', The Gulag Archipelago takes the reader on the colossal journey through Soviet Russia's prison industry. Alternatively witty, serious, brutally horrific, and gut-wrenchingly forthright, the author details the entire prison experience from initial arrest, kangaroo trials, and inhumane prison overcrowding in this Volume I installment of Stalin's 'sewage system' of greater Russia.

    Solzenhitsyn's epic account is divided into 7 parts, with the first ("The Prison Industry") by far the longest... and encompassing the entirety of Volume I, Section I (and most of Section II as well). Frederick Davidson's narrative style lends authority, warmth, compassion, and sometimes sardonic wit to the listener's experience of traversing the organs of Soviet Russia through the eyes, ears, sweat, blood, and tears of the anguished.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful

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