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Bronwen

I'm a geek with people skills. Strange, I know, but true!

Los Angeles, CA USA

ratings
16
REVIEWS
5
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FOLLOWERS
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HELPFUL VOTES
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  • 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Jules Verne
    • Narrated By James Frain
    Overall
    (150)
    Performance
    (141)
    Story
    (141)

    An American frigate, tracking down a ship-sinking monster, faces not a living creature but an incredible invention - a fantastic submarine commanded by the mysterious Captain Nemo. Suddenly a devastating explosion leaves just three survivors, who find themselves prisoners inside Nemo's death ship on an underwater odyssey around the world from the pearl-laden waters of Ceylon to the icy dangers of the South Pole... as Captain Nemo, one of the greatest villians ever created, takes his revenge on all society. More than a marvelously thrilling drama, this is a perfect classic novel,

    Tad Davis says: "Anthony Bonner!!"
    "Verne is Excellent, Frain less so..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    When I purchased this classic Jules Verne text, I was looking forward to exploring the oceans of the world beneath the waves with James Frain, an actor whose work I have enjoyed for more than a few years. Imagine my disappointment when listening to this masterpiece of writing, only to discover that Frain's performance was not the aural feast I had hoped for.

    Frain apparently had immense difficulty pronouncing a significant number of words in the book. (e.g. Anemone.) At first I thought it was my imagination that a phrase here and there was overdubbed, but as the incidences persisted I realized that not only were there a great many words he had mispronounced, but that the corrections were read in by someone other than Frain!

    Additionally, Frain's reading of the book is horribly uneven... The first part is rushed and flat, almost as if he were engaged in a reading race. Now, I will admit that I have become spoiled by Davina Porter's reading of the Outlander series, but the decision to read Ned Land with a Yorkshire accent??? He sounds like he's imitating Sean Bean! It's Ned *LAND* not Ned Stark! Ned Land's character is Canadian, not from Northern England. And that is the only character whose performance has a distinct voice. Conseil's voice is indistinguishable from that of Prof. Aronnax, the narrator in the piece, and Nemo's voice is likewise lackluster, sounding stiff and bland.

    By the time we get to the second part of the book Frain finally starts reading at a more reasonable pace, and with more feeling. Unfortunately, his voice has also become hoarse, and the transition from headlong-and-flat to reasonable-and-with-feeling-but-scratchy is so abrupt as not to be believed.

    All that said, it is still Jules Verne, and that may be the only saving grace for this audiobook. But given the shoddy performance Frain delivers in this work I will be hard-pressed to ever download a reading by him again.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Storm Front: The Dresden Files, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Jim Butcher
    • Narrated By James Marsters
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (10763)
    Performance
    (7666)
    Story
    (7670)

    A call from a distraught wife, and another from Lt Murphy of the Chicago PD Special Investigation Unit makes Harry believe things are looking up, but they are about to get worse, much worse. Someone is harnessing immense supernatural forces to commit a series of grisly murders. Someone has violated the first law of magic: Thou Shalt Not Kill. Tracking that someone takes Harry into the dangerous underbelly of Chicago, from mobsters.

    Tom says: "Excellent Story, Distracting Sound Engineering"
    "A rough start, but an excellent series!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This review is partly for Storm Front as a stand alone work, bit it is also a teaser for subsequent books in the series. I've listened to all 14 titles available as of this writing, so obviously I enjoy the series.

    In creating Harry Dresden, Jim Butcher has created a character every bit as gruff and chronically misguided as Carl Kolchak, the Chicago reporter featured in TV movies and a series which aired in the 1970s. If you enjoyed Kolchak, I expect you'll enjoy Dresden as well.

    Harry Dresden is a typical reluctant hero, doing what he thinks is best, partly because no one else sees the problems at hand, partly because no one else can tackle the bad guys causing the problems, and partly because he's a sucker with a heart of gold who doesn't know how to quit, especially if he's outnumbered, outclassed, and in a fight WAAAY out of his weight class.

    The stories read like old fashioned whodunnits, told in an easy narrative by Harry himself, almost as if he was sitting with you over a couple of beers, telling you his story, his insights, his motivations, his screw-ups... all of it. The style is very much like Kolchak's narration, but this time we're dealing with someone who knows more about the supernatural going in. Dresden knows when he's up against mega-nasties, knows when his chances of survival are practically nonexistent, and true to the reluctant-hero standard, he goes flying in where any sane person would collapse into a gibbering mass.

    And he survives (usually - but that's for the spoilers), learns, grows in power and responsibility. It takes a while, but over the course of the series Dresden goes from being a convicted murderer a hair's breadth away from execution to becoming a recognized defender of humanity in general and Chicago in particular. Supposedly, Butcher has mapped out a full-story arc for Dresden and hinted that it will take another 10-12 books to complete that arc. If that is true, I'm betting that Harry is in for a helluva ride!

    In reading the Dresden Files, James Marsters has also progressed, gaining skill as an audible book performer with each new volume. This first volume is the most rough, the least polished of the series. (It may have been his first audio book reading ever, but I can't confirm that.) There are several places where he mispronounces a word or two. There is background noise, the turning of pages... not a lot of it, but enough to be a distraction, especially if you are accustomed to listening to audio books.

    But fear not! By the very next book in the series, Marsters improves tremendously, both in terms of his performance and in the technical aspects of delivering that performance using his voice alone. Before the end of the second book it is impossible to imagine anyone else bringing Harry Dresden to life. Indeed, in the one book where another performer did the narration (Ghost Story: The Dresden Files, Book 13, Narrated By John Glover) it took a while to adjust to the difference in cadence and delivery. Don't mistake me, Glover did a fine job of narration, but after hearing Marsters as Dresden's voice for so many, many hours, it was a lot like having a familiar stranger in your home. Familiar, but not quite the same.

    Fair warning: If you are impressionable and have issues with horror stories, stay away from this series. If, on the other hand, you enjoy murder mysteries, film noir, cagey gents and sultry sirens, Harry Dresden will keep you entertained for a great many hours!

    Enjoy!


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Reaper Man: Discworld #11

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Terry Pratchett
    • Narrated By Nigel Planer
    Overall
    (918)
    Performance
    (403)
    Story
    (407)

    Edmund says: "The most moving of the series"
    "The Care of the Reaper Man..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The Discworld has many endearing characters, some frivolous, others ridiculous, and quite a few ironic to the point of absurdity. But of all the repeating characters in this twisted universe spawned from Terry Pratchett's mind, DEATH is one of my favorites.

    Reaper Man provides all the classic silliness one would expect from a Discworld novel, complete with wannabe-upwardly-mobile vampires, zombie support groups for the dead-but-not-quite-gone contingent, and a reverse wolfman who is a wolf three weeks a month and a man the rest of the time. And let us not forget the last surviving banshee on the Disc who is so afflicted with a speech impediment that he scribbles his wails on a note and slips them under the door.

    But these are just the supporting characters to DEATH, keeper of time and reaper of souls. Reaper Man is DEATH's story, filled with surprisingly tender moments scattered amidst the shenanigans at which Pratchett excels.

    The skeleton of the plot (sorry!) is that DEATH gets a performance review by cosmic auditors, and they hold that he has developed too much of a personality to do the job properly. In lieu of a golden watch, they give him a golden lifetimer for his retirement. The story then follows his (mis)adventures in dealing with the basics of living, along with sub-plots surrounding the side-effects that crop up on a magical world where everything has stopped dying and the excess life force builds up all over the place. The results are predictably explosive.

    What gives the story its greatest appeal (to me, at least), is that Pratchett manages to imbue DEATH with a mixture of naivete, worldliness, nobility and innocence. DEATH understands much about the way the universe of the Discworld operates, but he is hopeless when it comes to giving a woman flowers. He takes pride in collecting souls efficiently, but he is neither cruel nor heartless. He understands the necessity of his job, but there is respect and a surprising degree of empathy from someone who suffers from a severe lack of emotion. Other books have touched on these traits, but in Reaper Man they are given center stage.

    As in other Discworld readings by Nigel Planer, Planer narrates and performs the story with keen appreciation for the absurdity and pathos, bringing to life nuances in Pratchett's writing that I have missed when reading Discworld novels on my own. It also seems that Planer's repertoire of accents and vocal technique improves with each book. Since Reaper Man is the eleventh in the series, he has had ample opportunity to hone his skills such that his reading carries you into the story with grace and ease.

    In short, Reaper Man is pure Pratchett at his best, blending the silly and the serious in more or less equal measure, and Planer is the perfect conduit to Pratchett's world, in all its strangeness and wonder.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Equal Rites: Discworld #3

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By Terry Pratchett
    • Narrated By Celia Imrie
    Overall
    (1232)
    Performance
    (544)
    Story
    (551)

    Lisa L. Hilton says: "Lots of fun"
    "Needed to shift my ear gears, but worth it"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I've discovered my tendency to get attached to specific readers, so I was only partly surprised when my initial reaction to Celia Imrie's reading of Equal Rites was irritation. I had become accustomed to Nigel Planer's voice when immersing myself in the Discworld, but as the aural pages turned I realized the propriety of having a woman read this volume. The protagonists are women, after all, and somehow I don't think that Nigel would have personified Granny Weatherwax as well as he manages Rincewind, et al.

    As always, Terry Pratchett has me laughing out loud so often that people around me look at me strangely (or is it only that they think I'm strange enough to warrant more attention than a deranged ant..? Whatever...). And it seems that after a bit, Celia warmed up to the material and got a better grasp of the characters.

    By the time I was done with the book I felt the all-too-familiar sadness of moving on and leaving behind a narrator who had become a pleasant part of my routine.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Dance with Dragons: A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 5

    • UNABRIDGED (49 hrs)
    • By George R. R. Martin
    • Narrated By Roy Dotrice
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (11468)
    Performance
    (9975)
    Story
    (10013)

    Dubbed the American Tolkien by Time magazine, George R. R. Martin has earned international acclaim for his monumental cycle of epic fantasy. Now the number-one New York Times best-selling author delivers the fifth book in his spellbinding landmark series - as both familiar faces and surprising new forces vie for a foothold in a fragmented empire.

    Ryan says: "Enjoyable, but a lot of setup"
    "Should be called, "A dance with Circe""
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    After watching the HBO production of A Game of Thrones, I bought and have listened to all the available books in the series. This one is my least favorite of the bunch. Although I love many of the characters (and hate many of the villains), this book is a classic case of overwriting and poor editing.

    **SPOILER ALERT**

    Circe's descent into paranoia and misuse of power is predictable and adds little to the progression of the story overall. We knew it was coming - it was obvious within the first half of the first book. We don't need to have every last tiny, insignificant detail of her incompetence and lust for power explored. The net result is both tiresome and pedantic. (Reminds me of the fight scenes in the second and third Matrix movies.... ) Circe's eventual arrest for treason and humiliating walk through the city should have taken place within the first third of the book, not in the latter part. After reading through page after page of her self-obsessed and short-sighted megalomania, her fall was a blessed relief.

    Similarly, the struggles of Daenerys in Meereen is so fraught with endless details and arguments as to be mind-numbing. I don't *need* to read every debate and argument in the Meerenese court to know that Daenerys is never going to fit in there. It isn't until the last chapter that Daenerys' story line gets interesting again, restoring her to an active relationship with her dragons. Then it all ends in yet another cliff-hanger. The overall result is less than satisfying.

    Based on Martin's history, I think it's a fair bet that we're looking at several years before the next volume in the series is released. I only pray that the old gods and the new will make sure that he gets someone to edit this next book effectively.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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