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Jason

RENTON, WA, United States | Member Since 2013

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  • 1 reviews
  • 12 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 16 purchased in 2014
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  • The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Joseph E. Stiglitz
    • Narrated By Paul Boehmer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (382)
    Performance
    (323)
    Story
    (325)

    The top 1 percent of Americans control 40 percent of the nation's wealth. And, as Joseph E. Stiglitz explains, while those at the top enjoy the best health care, education, and benefits of wealth, they fail to realize that "their fate is bound up with how the other 99 percent live." Stiglitz draws on his deep understanding of economics to show that growing inequality is not inevitable. He examines our current state, then teases out its implications for democracy, for monetary and budgetary policy, and for globalization. He closes with a plan for a more just and prosperous future.

    Grant says: "Dense, but important."
    "Clear information, clear suggestions"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about The Price of Inequality?

    As the author states, the ideas and data are presented in ways so as to allow readers of all levels of economic understanding to enjoy and gain from this book.


    What does Paul Boehmer bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Paul does a fantastic job reading the book. He is quite enjoyable to listen to.


    Any additional comments?

    The author presents data, and also presents suggestions. The idea that the author wants to raise taxes to 70% is absurd. He simply states that some economists have said that mathematically that would be a realistic amount and that at that percentage, the top earners would still do fine. Contrary to what some reviews on here have said, he is not suggesting actually doing that.

    What the author does suggest is that, while the government isn't perfect (people are fallible) and corporations are not perfect (the market is entirely fallible), minor adjustments are needed in a civilized society to make sure the market behaves properly and functions for the good of more, not less people. This idea is not radicle. This idea is also not unproven.

    The key to the authors suggestions are just that, MINOR adjustments. Nothing radical at all about that. And nothing that ordinary, logical people could not agree with.

    The author shows, that if you are voting for people who pretend to care about you so they can keep more of what they earn (and trickle down to you as if more supply will equal more demand) you are doing so at great cost to yourself, your society, and your country.

    0 of 3 people found this review helpful

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