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KP

There is no Frigate like a Book To take us Lands away Nor any Coursers like a Page Of prancing Poetry – Emily Dickinson

Oakland, CA | Member Since 2012

107
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 111 reviews
  • 243 ratings
  • 554 titles in library
  • 14 purchased in 2015
FOLLOWING
6
FOLLOWERS
11

  • Life

    • UNABRIDGED (23 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Keith Richards, James Fox
    • Narrated By Johnny Depp, Joe Hurley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2751)
    Performance
    (1568)
    Story
    (1563)

    Now at last Keith Richards pauses to tell his story in the most anticipated autobiography in decades. And what a story! Listening obsessively to Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters records in a coldwater flat with Mick Jagger and Brian Jones, building a sound and a band out of music they loved. Finding fame and success as a bad-boy band, only to find themselves challenged by authorities everywhere....

    Jesse says: "Ins and outs"
    "good for Stones fans"
    Overall

    It was fascinating! If you have always loved The Rolling Stones and rock and roll and have a lot of nostalgia about the 60's... then I think you'd find Keith Richards memoir fascinating, too. It is long, but most of the time, well, I was just blown away hearing about all the stuff Keith Richards did. He has a great conversational style; listening was fun - kind of like sitting in the living room hearing him tell about his life (with help from Johnny Depp and one other reader.) What really shines through is his absolute love of music as well as his totally undisciplined and wild, wild life style. I liked it toward the end when he tells about how Tony Blair wrote him a get well letter (after an accident) and said, "Dear Keith, You've always been one of my heroes..." Then Keith says, "England's in the hands of someone I'm the hero of? That's frightening." I also liked the ending when he sits on the end of his dying mom's bed and plays Malaguena for her. That was one of the first songs he learned at the beginning of the book, so it seemed to be a good frame for the ending... and kind of touching.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • A Darkness More than Night: Harry Bosch Series, Book 7

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Michael Connelly
    • Narrated By Richard M. Davidson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2493)
    Performance
    (1255)
    Story
    (1271)

    A movie director is charged with murdering an actress during sex, and then staging her death to make it look like a suicide. In a seemingly unrelated case, a loner is murdered, leaving the sheriff's department with no clues. One unsettling revelation after another leaves a retired FBI agent and an L.A. detective thinking they've unmasked a most frightening killer with almost inconceivable calculation.

    Aaron says: "Terrific Pairing of Connelly's best Detectives."
    "Another Good Bosch Book!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As with the first 6 books in the Harry Bosch series, this one was very compelling and thoroughly enjoyable. It held up well in comparison – definitely as good as the others. Michael Connelly does not disappoint.

    The only problem I had with this book is the ending. In fact, in almost every Harry Bosch book there seems to be some type of twist RIGHT at the very end. I think that in most cases, these twists would be better left out. At least for the twists I remember, they seem to be added on at the end as if the author thinks the book hasn’t had enough excitement and he needs to keep things happening until the last second. I don’t agree with this technique. If the author wrapped the story up well, then why unravel it again at the end with some unrealistic twist or detail? That’s the way it seems to me, anyway.

    As an example of these unnecessary twists (spoiler alert here) in this book, it seemed ridiculous to me that McCaleb would come to Bosch at the end, after all the details of all the crimes were wrapped up, and accuse Bosch of setting up Rudy Tafero the way he did and say he didn’t want to be his friend anymore. I can see the point he’s making about the possible problem with Bosch’s actions regarding Rudy Tafero, however, it just seemed really unrealistic in the face of all they had been through and all the evil that Rudy Tafero had perpetrated. I thought McCaleb was being way too black and white about it all. Also, it sounded like an elementary school student saying, “I don’t want to be your friend anymore.” Really?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Lacuna

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 18 mins)
    • By Barbara Kingsolver
    • Narrated By Barbara Kingsolver
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (879)
    Performance
    (364)
    Story
    (360)

    Born in the United States, but reared in Mexico, Harrison Shepherd finds precarious shelter but no sense of home on his thrilling odyssey. Life is whatever he learns from housekeepers and, one fateful day, by mixing plaster for famed muralist Diego Rivera. When he goes to work for Rivera, his wife, exotic artist Kahlo, and exiled leader Lev Trotsky, Shepherd inadvertently casts his lot with art and revolution.

    Tricia Stevens says: "Great story!"
    "All About the Ending...."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    With this book, it’s all about the ending. It was truly magical – the ending, that is. However, that was only the last 30 minutes of so of reading or listening. Getting to this place was overly tedious. The writing was wonderful, and that, along with the ending, pulled the book up from the tedium. The sections with Kahlo, Rivera, and Trotsky were fascinating as character studies of these people, but … the plot! The plot seemed to be missing or at best rambling throughout this overly long book.

    I felt like much of the book was meant to be a history lesson, with Kingsolver’s political slant to it. Much of that was interesting, but it didn’t help the plot much! I learned a lot… about the Bonus Army, Mexico, Trotsky, the McCarthy era, etc.

    The ending, though. I can’t stop thinking about the ending! I liked that Violet Brown was the 1st person narrator of the final section. Because it is Violet speaking, we can’t know the complete truth about Harrison at the end. This perspective added to the magical quality of what happens, so it was a great decision on Kingsolver’s to use Violet to narrate here. When Violet gets the note from Frieda Kahlo, the mystery is solved to a certain point, and it is heart-warming. The reader is left yearning to know more about the note and all it implies, so the book goes out on a high note of interest and mystery.




    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Attached: The New Science of Adult Attachment and How It Can Help You Find - and Keep - Love

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Amir Levine, Rachel S. F. Heller
    • Narrated By Walter Dixon
    Overall
    (770)
    Performance
    (659)
    Story
    (653)

    Is there a science to love? In this groundbreaking audiobook, psychiatrist and neuroscientist Amir Levine and psychologist Rachel S. F. Heller reveal how an understanding of attachment theory - the most advanced relationship science in existence today - can help us find and sustain love. Attachment theory forms the basis for many best-selling books on the parent/child relationship, but there has yet to be an accessible guide to what this fascinating science has to tell us about adult romantic relationships - until now.

    Grace says: "Great book. Very illustrative."
    "Informative!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I got this book on sale on Audible.com over 2 years ago and hadn’t read it yet. I decided to give it a try, and it was much better than I expected! This Goodreads review by Gretchen Friese says pretty much what I was thinking:

    “I'm a little embarrassed to admit that I read this. Not because it wasn't good, but because I have this thing about posting relationship-y self-help books on here. I don't want people to know that I spend time thinking about my relationship status. I want to seem cooler than that.”

    Ha ha… well put. As for the book itself, I thought the information about attachment styles was really interesting and eye-opening. I wish I’d known about it as I was growing up and entering into various relationships! The only part that fell short for me was the application of the attachment theory into real life, and the advice the authors gave to people to use in their relationships. That part was over simplified, I thought. The guidelines and general concepts, however, are great and informative. Readers need to come up with their own strategies and permutations, however.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By Katherine Boo
    • Narrated By Sunil Malhotra
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (836)
    Performance
    (715)
    Story
    (726)

    Annawadi is a makeshift settlement in the shadow of luxury hotels near the Mumbai airport, and as India starts to prosper, Annawadians are electric with hope. Abdul, a reflective and enterprising Muslim teenager, sees “a fortune beyond counting” in the recyclable garbage that richer people throw away. Asha, a woman of formidable wit and deep scars from a childhood in rural poverty, has identified an alternate route to the middle class: political corruption.

    Dr. says: "An Antidote for Shantaram"
    "Caught Between Genres"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I have to admire the detailed research that went in to writing Behind the Beautiful Forevers. Katherine Boo shadowed so many people in the Annawadi slum of Mumbai for THREE YEARS. She does an amazing job of portraying their lives in all of their complexity. Her research didn’t end there, either. She evidently did much more intense document research as well. Her whole career has been spent examining disadvantaged communities in America and now India. She really opens up the eyes of the reader to what daily life is like and what the major issues are in Annawadi. Her website give a great overall look at how the book was written; I wish I had checked out the site before reading the book, actually. I think it deepened my appreciation for the task she undertook.

    What I came away with is the sense that in the Annawadi slums, as in all or most of India it seems, corruption is practically bred into people’s lives. For the poorest people who live in these slums, a corrupt life is the only way most of them can eek out a means of survival. The majority of these people don’t even feel bothered by their own total lack of ethics and morals; they are too poor and too overwhelmed with trying to simply survive. The widespread corruption gives the people a sense that they have lost control over their lives. The ground is always shifting under them due to the forces of corruption everywhere.

    The problem with the book for me is that it seems caught between two genres, creative non-fiction and the novel. I thought it would have been more interesting if Boo had just simply written a novel about the main characters in the book. Plenty of the factual info about their lives could have come across this way. As it was, the non-fiction tone and structure of the book got in the way of any enjoyment for me in the reading of it. It read like a catalogue of horrors and stories of corruption without enough glue to hold them together. Just when I finally learned the names of those that would become the main characters, the author would go off on a tangent to describe other characters and issues. The names became too many and after a while I didn’t really care. Luckily, the main characters finally came back into focus and the story carried on for a while, only to be derailed with more tangents which could illustrate more of the horrible issues going on in the Annawadi slums.

    So, my review is based on my enjoyment of the book, which was almost non-existent at most points. If I were to rate it based on value and importance of the message, then I’d give it a top rating.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Cutting Season: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Attica Locke
    • Narrated By Quincy Tyler Bernstine
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (292)
    Performance
    (253)
    Story
    (252)

    Caren Gray manages Belle Vie, a sprawling antebellum plantation that sits between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, where the past and the present coexist uneasily. The estate's owners have turned the place into an eerie tourist attraction, complete with full-dress re-enactments and carefully restored slave quarters. Outside the gates, a corporation with ambitious plans has been busy snapping up land from struggling families who have been growing sugar cane for generations, and now replacing local employees with illegal laborers. Tensions mount when the body of a female migrant worker is found in a shallow grave on the edge of the property.

    C. Telfair says: "Mystery + Atmosphere = A Definite Winner!"
    "Underwhelmed"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The opening of the book was lush and held out much promise for an engrossing southern novel. However, the characters and the story didn’t live up to this beginning. I did enjoy the descriptions of a “living” plantation, Belle Vie, in this day and age. That part was fascinating. The main character, Caren, however, seemed unlikeable and I just didn’t care much about her. She makes some really stupid decisions. The relationship she has with her ex –husband just doesn’t ring true to me. In fact, all her relationships seem washed out or bland.

    In the end, the solution to the mystery just seems to pop up out of nowhere. Or did I miss something?

    Overall, I was underwhelmed.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Storyteller

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Jodi Picoult
    • Narrated By Mozhan Marno, Jennifer Ikeda, Edoardo Ballerini, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3944)
    Performance
    (3446)
    Story
    (3460)

    Jodi Picoult's poignant number one New York Times best-selling novels about family and love tackle hot-button issues head on. In The Storyteller, Sage Singer befriends Josef Weber, a beloved Little League coach and retired teacher. But then Josef asks Sage for a favor she never could have imagined - to kill him. After Josef reveals the heinous act he committed, Sage feels he may deserve that fate. But would his death be murder or justice?

    Suzn F says: "The Baker, The Nun, The Virgin and The Monster"
    "All the Right Elements"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book had all the right elements for a great read: it was a good story that had many levels, the writing was good, there were lessons about history, as well as philosophical or ethical questions to ponder.

    I loved the way there were 3 different stories going on at once. First there is the story of Sage and her struggle with how to interact with Joseph Weber and her meeting Leo. Then there is Minka’s story of the Upior, based on an old Polish fairy tale. This was interesting as a parallel and a metaphor for many of the actions and horrors that occurred in the book. The third and, to me, the most dramatic story was that of Minka herself and her path into and finally out of two different German concentration camps. The author very skillfully weaves these 3 story lines together in such a way that each story line adds to and helps to develop the other.

    Spoiler alert here: I had trouble putting the book down! If I have any criticism, it’s with the ending. I’m not sure that the big switch in the character of Joseph Weber at the end was necessary or very well explained. Also, the idea that Sage pulls off her final act but seems to have no intention of sharing it or talking about it with Leo seems unrealistic. OR perhaps I’m unconvinced that she really could or would pull off this final decision. I feel like this final section was, perhaps, rushed or underdeveloped in relation to all that had come before. However, this didn't spoil my enjoyment of the book overall.

    I highly recommend it.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Orphan Train: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Christina Baker Kline
    • Narrated By Jessica Almasy, Suzanne Toren
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (6875)
    Performance
    (6023)
    Story
    (6044)

    Penobscot Indian Molly Ayer is close to "aging out" out of the foster care system. A community-service position helping an elderly woman clean out her home is the only thing keeping Molly out of juvie and worse.... As she helps Vivian sort through her possessions and memories, Molly learns that she and Vivian aren’t as different as they seem to be. A young Irish immigrant orphaned in New York City, Vivian was put on a train to the Midwest with hundreds of other children whose destinies would be determined by luck and chance.

    Kathi says: "Moving story of sharing and transformation."
    "Doesn't live up to the reviews"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book didn’t live up to all of its 4 and 5 star reviews. Although the story of the orphan trains itself is interesting, I found the book to be stereotyped and shallow.

    One example is the foster mother of Molly. The author threw in so many stereotypes which she obviously found to be “evil” but which don’t necessarily ring true to me as definitive markers of an evil person: she listens to conservative talk radio, she is NOT a vegetarian, she has an anti-abortion bumper sticker, etc etc. SO, the author is definitely prejudiced against conservatives, BUT I think there could have been a more skillful way to portray a person who is supposed to be as judgmental and uncaring as the foster mom. This author took a short cut, but it didn’t work.

    The book seemed like it should be categorized as a young adult novel. It was too oversimplified and moralistic for me. The ending packs a big emotional wallop, and did make me cry. I believe that is why it ended up getting such good reviews. As a whole, it is really not worth it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Trunk Music: Harry Bosch Series, Book 5

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By Michael Connelly
    • Narrated By Dick Hill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2789)
    Performance
    (1760)
    Story
    (1753)

    Back on the job after an involuntary leave of absence, LAPD homicide detective Harry Bosch is ready for a challenge. But his first case is a little more than he bargained for. It starts with the body of a Hollywood producer in the trunk of a Rolls-Royce, shot twice in the head at close range - what looks like "trunk music", a Mafia hit.

    Dan says: "Another Harry Bosch winner"
    "I like spending time with Harry B."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story



    ***SPOILER ALERT****
    I thoroughly enjoyed Trunk Music and would have given it my highest rating EXCEPT that the ending seemed so contrived and phony that I had to knock it down just a little. It seemed just wrong to have Victoria Aliso blurt out as she died to, “… save my daughter.” What daughter? That’s the first we hear of it. And really? Her daughter turns out to be Layla, the Las Vegas dancer that Victoria’s HUSBAND is having an affair with? As if that weren’t enough, THEN Bosch and Eleanor run across Layla when they leave L.A. and Vegas and begin their honeymoon in Hawaii on the very last page. That coincidence seems just way too contrived. If there had been a plot of some dimension about Victoria, Layla, and their histories, then fine. However, to just throw these two facts in at the very end does NOT work to make the book and the plot seem believable.

    Other than that, I found the book very readable and compelling, as with most of the Harry Bosch books. I’ll keep on reading about Harry Bosch. I wondered about the title "Trunk Music," and found what it means: ”...a wise guy saying outta Chicago.. when they whack some poor slob they say, “Oh, Tony Don't worry about Tony. He’s trunk music now. You won’t see him no more. “



    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • All the Light We Cannot See: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Anthony Doerr
    • Narrated By Zach Appelman
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (9469)
    Performance
    (8241)
    Story
    (8262)

    Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is 12, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

    Annie M. says: "Time well spent"
    "Engrossing!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    A very engrossing book! It’s a really good story, but the build up is a bit too long. I like the way the reader has a lot of sympathy for Werner. He is basically trapped his whole life, but he undergoes a transformation that is extremely heartwarming at the end, and the build up here makes the extra length of the book worthwhile.

    It seemed like the author is trying to show the reader how it feels to be blind, like the main character, young Marie Laure. This is admirable, however, I found all the minute descriptions from the mind of the blind girl to be too detailed. It was hard for me to appreciate them. Just like I didn’t enjoy reading a book where the narrator supposedly had Asperger syndrome, I didn’t really like seeing the world through the eyes of Marie Laure.

    Also, the chapters skip around chronologically, which I found somewhat disorienting, since I was listening to the book. This technique is a good one, but at some points it seemed to be over-used.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Euphoria: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By Lily King
    • Narrated By Simon Vance, Xe Sands
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (638)
    Performance
    (555)
    Story
    (544)

    English anthropologist Andrew Bankson has been alone in the field for several years, studying the Kiona river tribe in the territory of New Guinea. Haunted by the memory of his brothers' deaths and increasingly frustrated and isolated by his research, Bankson is on the verge of suicide when a chance encounter with colleagues, the controversial Nell Stone and her wry and mercurial Australian husband, Fen, pulls him back from the brink. Nell and Fen have just fled the bloodthirsty Mumbanyo and, in spite of Nell's poor health, are hungry for a new discovery.

    David says: "Anthropologists in Love"
    "Fascinating!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was fascinated by this book. Setting is big; it swept me away to another world, the world of New Guinea in the 1930’s. It wasn’t until after I finished reading Euphoria that I found out it was based on the life of Margaret Mead. (Ok, DUH :) As I was reading, I kept thinking that there had to be a real person like this. Sometimes an author’s research just comes through or seems obvious, and then the reader can tell that there WAS someone who did it like this. The same thing happened in “The Invention of Wings.” As I read along and saw so many specifics about various characters, I figured that it must be about someone REAL. (That was another DUH, since it’s on the back of the book! Hey, I listened to both of them :)

    Now that I read that Euphoria is based on Margaret Mead and a particular time in her life, I want to know more. There really was a love triangle (according to a review I read – see below) ! How juicy and exciting, AND it was exciting in the book, too. The author did such a good job of building up all the tension and revealing the facts of the situation slowly and in a somewhat mysterious way. I loved that about the book. The last 1/3 or so of it was the most exciting as all the pieces fell in to place. The ending obviously veers off from the life of Margaret Mead; I’d like to find out in what other areas the fictional character is different.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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