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Patrick

PCS

Member Since 2010

3
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 4 reviews
  • 5 ratings
  • 595 titles in library
  • 54 purchased in 2014
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  • Kill Decision

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Daniel Suarez
    • Narrated By Jeff Gurner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2963)
    Performance
    (2643)
    Story
    (2652)

    Linda McKinney is a myrmecologist, a scientist who studies the social structure of ants. Her academic career has left her entirely unprepared for the day her sophisticated research is conscripted by unknown forces to help run an unmanned - and thanks to her research, automated - drone army. Odin is the secretive Special Ops soldier with a unique insight into the faceless enemy who has begun to attack the American homeland with drones programmed to seek, identify, and execute targets.

    Madeleine says: "What's that droning sound?"
    "An Edge of Reality SciFi Adventure"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Where does Kill Decision rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    This is certainly a top 5 in the SciFi genre. It follows Daniel Suarez's approach of a scientifically & technologically validated story that pushes a couple inches past today's technology and imagines what would happen if it fell in the wrong hands. I loved Daemon and questioned if he could keep up the caliber of writing and think he may have even surpassed his initial offering by keeping the story more succinct, as I felt the Daemon Freedom pairing began to drag slightly.


    What does Jeff Gurner bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    The audiobook includes actual foreign languages into the reading of the book. This gives an added ambiance of reality to firmly establish a context for the story you are hearing.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Absolutely. I finished the book in 2 1/2 days and each day couldn't wait to start it again


    Any additional comments?

    Daniel Suarez has truly carved out a niche in the nearly realistic SciFi genere. In this way, he has become the technical complement to Michael Criton's medically accurate adventures. He is a masterful wordsmith and storyteller who replaces thinly veiled jargon with precisely researched technical detail to keep the informed reader entrenched in the believable world he creates.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Love Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Rob Bell
    • Narrated By Rob Bell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (574)
    Performance
    (343)
    Story
    (344)

    Millions of Christians have struggled with how to reconcile God's love and God's judgment: Has God created billions of people over thousands of years only to select a few to go to heaven and everyone else to suffer forever in hell? Is this acceptable to God? How is this "good news"? Author, pastor, and innovative teacher Rob Bell presents a deeply biblical vision for rediscovering a richer, grander, truer, and more spiritually satisfying way of understanding heaven, hell, God, Jesus, salvation, and repentance.

    Paula says: "Easy reading, straight forward, life changing"
    "Thought provoking but not rigorous"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Rob Bell attempts to dispel some of the anecdotal theology which has come up to surround the Bible that is unsupported by the Bible itself. To this end he succeeds, but he quickly moves from dispelling bad theology to doubting incontrovertible truths of scripture. He rightly identifies god as the focal point of heaven, the reality of a physical and enjoyable place, and the need for condemnation of the unrepentant. However, he fails to close the door on some heresies which the Bible is in fact explicit about. He emphasizes God's love to the point of mistaking it for the whole of God's character rather than one of his attributes, and skews his interpretation of what love should look like to fit his personal expectations to the point of undoing many well supported doctrines regarding Hell. To this end I would highly recommend reading Francis Chan's book Crazy Love either instead of or along with this book should you choose to read Love Wins. Ultimately, Rob Bell narrowly steers clear of outright espousing any heretical theological positions, but in his exploration of possible interpretation he leaves the door open on many doctrines about which the Bible leaves no wiggle room. I cannot in good conscience recommend this book, either to the unbeliever who could mistake Bell's willingness to abandon sound doctrine with the unsound doctrines at the point of personal preference, or to the believer looking to expand his understanding of scripture as Bell relies more heavily in his own interpretation and assumptions than the vast array of scripture that undermines most of his more controversial conclusions and suggestions. I can only really recommend this book to someone who is interacting with a friend, family member or coworker who is enamored with Love Wins so that you can in love help them to separate the important valid points that Bell makes (which have been made by others before him and will be made by others in the future) from his overreaching assertions brought forth from faulty assumptions and infusing his opinions and definitions to mold scripture to fit his expectations, and then I would recommend supplementing it with either Crazy Love or another book which challenges the conclusions Bell reaches. Finally test everything Bell and others say with the totality of scripture, not just the proof texts they offer. Bell has some good points, but the number of and implications from unwarranted assertions from Bell lead me to recommend against reading this book unless you have a desire and the time to thoroughly engage the text and the scriptures so as to not be misled by some sweet sounding doctrinal errors.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Erasing Hell: What God Said about Eternity, and the Things We Made Up

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By Francis Chan, Preston Sprinkle
    • Narrated By Preston Sprinkle
    Overall
    (196)
    Performance
    (154)
    Story
    (154)

    How could a loving God send people to Hell? Will people have a chance after they die to believe in Jesus and go to heaven? With a humble respect for God’s Word, Francis Chan and Preston Sprinkle address the deepest questions you have about eternal destiny. They’ve asked the same questions. Like you, sometimes they just don’t want to believe in Hell. But, as they write, “We cannot afford to be wrong on this issue.” This is not a book about who is saying what. It’s a book about what God says.

    Nate says: "Fantastic Response to Universalism"
    "A intellectual and spiritual doctrine of hell"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you love best about Erasing Hell?

    Francis Chan does what few authors are capable of doing: responding to a heresy without overcompensating to the opposite extreme. Chan rightly points out the theological vacuum that under girds Rob Bell's intellectual exercise, "Love Wins", but refuses to go the extreme of being a hell celebrator or fire and brimstone preacher. He insists on a genuinely Biblical conclusion that ought to drive us to love our neighbor more completely, rather than seek to scare them into an apparent conversion. He puts firm intellectual bounds on what the reality of hell might be based on scripture (the main thing lacking from Bell's approach) and puts a strong focus on God's incomprehensible mercy without skipping over the inescapable reality of hell.


    What other book might you compare Erasing Hell to and why?

    This is similar to "Love Wins" in what it seeks to cover, but addresses the topic of hell in a way that is more scripturally honest, intellectually rigorous and ultimately spiritually challenging - asking the reader to throw himself into the merciful hands of God rather than trying to mold God's nature to fit a form of mercy we can comprehend.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    I liked the entire second half of the book. I was prepared for a purely intellectual rebuttal to Rob Bell, and was reading through with my expected nodding along with points I agreed with wholeheartedly. Then the author took a turn demanding of the reader to self-evaluate how these known truths were impacting daily living. I was genuinely challenged not by verbose wording or intellectual prowess but by the simple word of God in context to evaluate how I was loving my neighbor and what I was doing in response to the reality of heaven and hell.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I was extremely convicted by the second half of the book. I read it wanting an intellectual exercise and affirmation, but I got that and a spiritual challenge to live more lovingly.


    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Redshirts: A Novel with Three Codas

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By John Scalzi
    • Narrated By Wil Wheaton
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (6263)
    Performance
    (5833)
    Story
    (5836)

    Ensign Andrew Dahl has just been assigned to the Universal Union Capital Ship Intrepid, flagship of the Universal Union since the year 2456. Life couldn’t be better…until Andrew begins to pick up on the facts that (1) every Away Mission involves some kind of lethal confrontation with alien forces; (2) the ship’s captain, its chief science officer, and the handsome Lieutenant Kerensky always survive these confrontations; and (3) at least one low-ranked crew member is, sadly, always killed.

    Paige says: "Not his Wheal-house"
    "Fair book: Galaxy Quest/ Star Trek meets ..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you consider the audio edition of Redshirts to be better than the print version?

    Yes. Wil Wheaton does an excellent job giving voice to the characters and pacing the story well.


    Would you be willing to try another book from John Scalzi? Why or why not?

    Maybe. It felt like the book could benefit some from a Thesaurus and a harsher editor. While the plot moved along fine, his sentence structure and vocabulary remained low and repetitive to the point of annoyance. Lines like "he quietly entered the quite alley" just hearken me back to what I used to write in Junior High. Ultimately, its tolerable, but it is something I wish could be improved.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    *********SEMI-SPOILER ALERT***********
    **********(this isn't revealed until 1/3 of the way through)**********

    Star Trek meets Stranger Than Fiction: Star Trek redshirts seek compromise with show writers to escape their imminently written deaths


    Any additional comments?



    Ultimately, I found the book just okay. I enjoy the Star Trek universe, and thought that despite being simply a combination of 2 basic plot lines with only average writing the book had a decent pace and was fun to read. Personally I would recommend books like Daemon, Ready Player One, or Reamde to the geek looking for a modern SciFi adventure but if you have exhausted those top shelf options this is certainly worth the time to listen through.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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