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N. M. Dierker

Aurora, CO United States | Member Since 2011

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  • 1 reviews
  • 5 ratings
  • 92 titles in library
  • 8 purchased in 2014
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  • Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Michael Moss
    • Narrated By Scott Brick
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1035)
    Performance
    (907)
    Story
    (902)

    Every year, the average American eats 33 pounds of cheese (triple what we ate in 1970) and 70 pounds of sugar (about 22 teaspoons a day). We ingest 8,500 milligrams of salt a day, double the recommended amount, and almost none of that comes from the shakers on our table. It comes from processed food. It’s no wonder, then, that one in three adults, and one in five kids, is clinically obese.

    Michael says: "This is all too real, and YOU are the victim."
    "Excellent and Informative"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Any additional comments?

    This should be required reading for everyone, especially parents. It should also be a television series to educate those who don't like to read and a video shown in high schools. Throughout college, I always said no to drugs because I was afraid to be out of control. Little did I know that I was already under the spell of processed foods.

    Reading this book also prompted interesting emotional swings. I would remember with fondness products introduced in the 70's and 80's to make life "easier" or "better." Then I would get angry reading about the companies studying human behavior to "improve" their products to maximize profits. It was hard not to think of consumers as lab rats being manipulated by the Kraft, Pepsi and Coke companies.

    If I keep writing, I sense the rant would go on and on, without providing a review of the book. It is a good read, well researched and documented. The information is delivered in a way that felt neutral (some might say that I wasn't really paying attention or reading between the lines to get the subliminal text). When I closed the book, I felt motivated to tackle my "comfort food" demons and improve the options I make available to my kids. I don't blame the food industry for the obesity epidemic because I do think we are each responsible for our choices. I do wonder, though, if we were left with fewer choices, would we make as many poor ones. If we weren't so overwhelmed with the hectic pace of all we try to do, perhaps we could slow down and reflect on what our bodies really need to stay healthy and energized.

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful

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