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Alexandria

Alexandria

New York | Member Since 2012

63
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 50 reviews
  • 133 ratings
  • 449 titles in library
  • 60 purchased in 2015
FOLLOWING
12
FOLLOWERS
5

  • The Book Thief

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Markus Zusak
    • Narrated By Allan Corduner
    Overall
    (10442)
    Performance
    (8358)
    Story
    (8398)

    It's just a small story really, about, among other things, a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak's groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can't resist: books.

    Amazon Customer says: "Word Thief"
    "Unexpected and refreshing"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This may sound cold, but at some point, all the books about WWII and Nazi Germany started sounding alike. I postponed listening to this book for that very reason. Happily, The Book Thief is NOT like the others. This is (shockingly) a story you have not heard yet.

    The most immediately refreshing, engaging, and unique aspect of The Book Thief, right from the start, is that it's told from the perspective of Death. And not just any death, but one which is a poetic, sarcastic workaholic. In fact, the narration by Death not only seems obvious - who better to narrate a story of WWII? - but provides such a strong voice that it becomes immediately clear that this book would not be like the others. This book would be new and different. And indeed, it took many aspects of that time and cast them in such surprising light that nothing seemed familiar. Listening to this book is like looking at WWII and Nazi Germany for the first time. Refreshing!

    The characters are primary and the plot is secondary. The characters became real people in my imagination. The reader glimpses their exteriors, their interiors, their pasts and their futures and none of it is old or recycled. They are as real as if you are meeting them on a street in Germany. Their relationships are not idealized or overly structured, and the love between the characters is real love shown in all its imperfections.

    Perhaps a stronger plot would have caused me to add an exclamation to my 5 stars, but as it is, The Book Thief was such a relief, such a new and engaging way of telling stories of WWII and all that it encompassed, that I feel like I've gained new perspective. Hopefully this book inspires other writers to veer off the beaten path in telling their own WWII stories in the future.

    I recommend The Book Thief without reservation. It will add to your perspective!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • State of Wonder: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Ann Patchett
    • Narrated By Hope Davis
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4654)
    Performance
    (3406)
    Story
    (3407)

    Research scientist Dr. Marina Singh is sent to Brazil to track down her former mentor, Dr. Annick Swenson, who seems to have disappeared in the Amazon while working on an extremely valuable new drug. The last person who was sent to find her died before he could complete his mission. Plagued by trepidation, Marina embarks on an odyssey into the insect-infested jungle in hopes of finding answers to the questions about her friend's death, her company's future, and her own past.

    F. B. Herron says: "Do yourself a favor and listen to this book!"
    "A Critique of Modernity"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This novel asks questions about the destructive nature of science in a world of limited resources and of dwindling native populations. It repeatedly draws attention to the price that is paid for the sake of "progress" - both by the Amazonian natives and by the Western scientists conducting research outside their own native environments. It asks questions about the privilege of scientific education set against an environment where the only useful education is one concerning nature, survival, and tribe and it draws attention to the power dynamics implicit in such opposing forms of existence and beliefs. I did not view this as a story about individual struggle or salvation, and I found the ending to be apt. Considered within the broader framework of the story and its message, another sort of ending may not have so well emphasized the privilege inherent in the scientists' ability to decide their own futures and the prices they are willing to pay (juxtaposed against the Natives, who are granted no such privilege of choice, even over their own bodies and resources). It is an excellent exploration of the cost of modernity and Western belief systems.

    I think those reading this novel only for the surface narrative about the protagonist and her experience will find it disappointing. I found it helpful to engage with this story through a postcolonial reading, and I found Patchett's choice of subject matter deftly navigated muddy and complicated waters of issues of modernity, science, and privilege. Her decision to set the story in the Amazon could not have been an accident, for the issues she navigates are just as complex and intertwining as the Amazon River itself.

    I found this to be a very rewarding and enlightening read/listen. Patchett makes a contribution to the discourse of power, ethics, and modernity through a refreshing perspective.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Absolutist

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By John Boyne
    • Narrated By Michael Maloney
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (138)
    Performance
    (129)
    Story
    (128)

    It is September 1919: Twenty-one-year-old Tristan Sadler takes a train from London to Norwich to deliver a package of letters to the sister of Will Bancroft, the man he fought alongside during the Great War. But the letters are not the real reason for Tristan's visit. He can no longer keep a secret and has finally found the courage to unburden himself of it. As Tristan recounts the horrific details of what to him became a senseless war, he also speaks of his friendship with Will - from their first meeting on the training grounds at Aldershot to their farewell in the trenches of northern France.

    Dennis says: "A Thin Red Line Between Love and Hate"
    "Inconsistent audio ruins a good book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The narration of this book was extremely frustrating and blocked me from enjoying it. Maloney melodramatically whispers the majority of the book, so that I found myself constantly tuning the volume instead of taking in the book. After whispering the voice of the main character for an extended period of time, he would suddenly switch to the booming voice of a supporting character, causing me to hurry to re-adjust the volume again. He differentiates the voices well, but he needs to speak up. The whispering melodrama does not benefit this audio in the least.

    I strongly suggest reading this book rather than listening to Maloney's narration.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Last Rhinos: My Battle to Save One of the World's Greatest Creatures

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 36 mins)
    • By Lawrence Anthony, Graham Spence
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    Overall
    (130)
    Performance
    (122)
    Story
    (122)

    When Lawrence Anthony learned that the northern white rhino, living in the war-ravaged Congo, was on the very brink of extinction, he knew he had to act. If the world lost the sub-species, it would be the largest land mammal since the woolly mammoth to go extinct. In The Last Rhinos, Anthony recounts his attempts to save these remarkable animals. The demand for rhino horns in the Far East has turned poaching into a dangerous black market that threatens the lives of not just these rare beasts, but also the rangers who protect them.

    matthew says: "A mediocre adventure"
    "Front Line Conservation"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book surprised me. First, it is important to note that, unlike the Elephant Whisperer, the rhinos in this book are more in the background; they are not all-pervasive and the personalities and personal stories of individual rhinos are not emphasized. Instead, it is much more a story about what happens outside the reserve, really touching on the human issues that help or hurt conservation efforts: politics, economics, social and welfare elements, war. Anthony's involvement in the Juba Peace Talks between the LRA and the Ugandan government provided a huge portion of this book, and with good reason: it emphasized the dueling roles of war and peace in conservation efforts, and also highlighted other not-so-glamorous roadblocks, like mundane paperwork and the absurdities of bureaucracy.

    This book is a fitting addition to Anthony's corpus of conservation memoirs, providing new perspectives and highlighting how even the minutiae of human existence play vital roles in saving (or losing) wildlife species like the white rhino.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Kurt Vonnegut
    • Narrated By Eric Michael Summerer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (870)
    Performance
    (712)
    Story
    (722)

    Eliot Rosewater, a drunk volunteer fireman and president of the fabulously rich Rosewater Foundation, is about to attempt a noble experiment with human nature, with a little help from writer Kilgore Trout. The result is Kurt Vonnegut's funniest satire, an etched-in-acid portrayal of the greed, hypocrisy, and follies of the flesh we are all heir to.

    Darwin8u says: "Hello, babies. Welcome to Earth."
    "Not Vonnegut's best, but not bad"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The topic of this book serves as a satirical commentary on American capitalism and the place that money - and the people who have it - hold within society. It is a theme worthy of exploration, but this book lacks the typical spot-on punch of Vonnegut's best work. The message still gets through and in a fairly entertaining fashion, but it falls short of ensuring a lasting impression.

    Summerer's narration irritated me at first, but I soon warmed to him. His voice contains a gleeful irony that is perfect for Eliot Rosewater's particular brand of "madness."

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • How Much Land Does a Man Need?

    • UNABRIDGED (36 mins)
    • By Leo Tolstoy
    • Narrated By Walter Zimmerman
    Overall
    (40)
    Performance
    (20)
    Story
    (21)

    Tolstoy is primarily know for his impressively long novels, but he also wrote some wonderful short stories. This one, dealing with ambition and greed, has an unforgettable message.

    James says: "Great story but..."
    "Eloquent parable about greed"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is more of a parable than a short story. It is concise and to the point and very easy to reproduce orally. For example, after hearing this story just once, I know that I could repeat it easily and quickly to another person in order to illustrate a salient point about the human weakness for greed. Tolstoy does it beautifully all the way to the last line, which is perfectly ironic.

    Walter Zimmerman's halting, dispassionate, and monotone narration is all the more ironic for the story's exceptional oral qualities.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Prayer for Owen Meany

    • UNABRIDGED (26 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By John Irving
    • Narrated By Joe Barrett
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4197)
    Performance
    (3064)
    Story
    (3075)

    Of all of John Irving's books, this is the one that lends itself best to audio. In print, Owen Meany's dialogue is set in capital letters; for this production, Irving himself selected Joe Barrett to deliver Meany's difficult voice as intended. In the summer of 1953, two 11-year-old boys – best friends – are playing in a Little League baseball game in Gravesend, New Hampshire. One of the boys hits a foul ball that kills the other boy's mother. The boy who hits the ball doesn't believe in accidents; Owen Meany believes he is God's instrument. What happens to Owen after that 1953 foul ball is extraordinary and terrifying.

    Alan says: "Outstanding"
    "Owen the faithful"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a marvelous book, and exemplary of the level of achievement that can come out of an author's staggering commitment to the exploration of a specific theme. In this case the theme deals overwhelmingly with religion and morality and in particular Christianity - what might it really look like to be a person of faith in the modern world, and what might be the implications on an individual level? Is a human society capable of supporting non-hypocritical morality; and considering a person is capable of such a feat, how would it impact those around him/her? 'A Prayer for Owen Meany' is John Irving's nuanced by flawed answer to that question, and remarkably his Owen is the type of person whom Irving has said would not be able to survive in the modern world ("modernity" being a secondary theme of the novel) because of the weakness of the human character, the willful ignorance of the masses, and lack of faith of most "people of faith". Yet this fact is not explicitly stated in the book, which instead provides a complex exploration of how such a scenario might play out set against a modern Western backdrop whose forces are opposed to both morality and faith - while purporting to be both. Most religious people would probably not recognize themselves in Owen Meany, a fact which Irving exploits as a consuming, fascinating study of what faith actually means, and how it actually shows up. I am not a Christian, but you don't need to be to enjoy this book or take something from it; the message is complex and transcendent.

    John Barrett was an exquisite choice to read this book. The best singular narration I've ever heard.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • George Carlin Reads to You: An Audio Collection Including Grammy Winners 'Braindroppings' and 'Napalm & Silly Putty'

    • ORIGINAL (7 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By George Carlin
    • Narrated By George Carlin
    Overall
    (1427)
    Performance
    (1286)
    Story
    (1270)

    If one George Carlin audio is funny, then two are funnier and three must be funniest, right? That's our thinking behind this new collection. t's a HighBridge library of laugh-out-loud, award-winning recordings featuring George himself performing many of his best bits.

    Rick says: "Like a Cast of Thousands"
    "Ebb and flow, up and down"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is audiobook made me laugh hysterically for a few bits, then bored me to tears for a few bits. But in the end, I really only remember laughing. George Carlin read to me before bed every night for about two weeks, and his extremely enthusiastic (if I can use that word) narration held me rapt, even while listening to long lists of oxymorons and Carlin's pet peeves for minutes at a time (some of them were quite witty).

    George Carlin reading to me was a nice change of pace.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Thérèse Raquin

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs)
    • By Emile Zola
    • Narrated By Kate Winslet
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (991)
    Performance
    (909)
    Story
    (898)

    Once upon a time, a teenaged Kate Winslet (The Reader, Titanic, Revolutionary Road) received a gift that would leave a lasting impression: a copy of Emile Zola’s classic Thérèse Raquin. Six Academy Award nominations and one Best Actress award later, she steps behind the microphone to perform this haunting classic of passion and disaster.

    FanB14 says: "Wonderful Winslet, Satisfactory Story"
    "A very grim classic"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I am not opposed to gloomy stories generally, but I found this book so profoundly depressing that it started to affect my quality of life and I was relieved when it was over. Kate Winslet's narration is quite good, but her tone certainly does nothing to relieve any of the darkness from the tale, though I doubt it was supposed to. The book is well written but at times seems directionless and un-anchored, though I think that may have been the point.

    If you enjoy some of the more grim classics, this is definitely for you.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women's Prison

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Piper Kerman
    • Narrated By Cassandra Campbell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4217)
    Performance
    (3782)
    Story
    (3807)

    With a career, a boyfriend, and a loving family, Piper Kerman barely resembles the reckless young woman who delivered a suitcase of drug money 10 years ago. But that past has caught up with her. Convicted and sentenced to 15 months at the infamous federal correctional facility in Danbury, Connecticut, the well-heeled Smith College alumna is now inmate #11187-424 - one of the millions of women who disappear "down the rabbit hole" of the American penal system.

    Mark says: "My favorite book of the year, so far"
    "Good memoir on a woman's prison life"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was conflicted on how to rate this memoir. It moves quickly and it is about a a subject matter people rarely hear about, providing a look inside a womens prison and into the how the war on drugs affects women. It is not fabulous writing, but its quick, to-the-point pace makes up for it. Cassandra Campbell's narration was intensely irritating at first, but it improves as other characters are introduced and Campbell has a chance to prove herself with the accents, which she does well, assigning different and distinct voices to each of the women so that they come alive.

    The author is hyper aware of her privileged status as an upper class white woman in the prison context, and she makes an effort to integrate a lower-class, minority perspective into her writing. But since the cards are not stacked so fiercely against her as they are against most of her fellow inmates, she can do little in this respect except offer empathy. There are several dialogue scenes between Piper and authority figures in the book, where it is more or less revealed that the drug laws in place are not intended for nice upperclass white people like herself, and she is repeatedly told that she doesn't belong there. This is irritating from a policy perspective, because it implies that the other less privileged women in the prison ARE supposed to be there, despite having similar convictions for drug-related crimes. Though she is undoubtedly writing from a place of privilege, it is to Piper's credit that she does try to shed light on the absurdity of drug policy and its motivations and highlight how devastating the war on drugs is for less privileged women, and how the prison system in the US makes the situation worse.

    It is worth the credit.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Trick of the Light: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By Louise Penny
    • Narrated By Ralph Cosham
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1326)
    Performance
    (1142)
    Story
    (1136)

    “Hearts are broken,” Lillian Dyson carefully underlined in a book. “Sweet relationships are dead.” But now Lillian herself is dead. Found among the bleeding hearts and lilacs of Clara Morrow's garden in Three Pines, shattering the celebrations of Clara's solo show at the famed Musée in Montreal.

    barbara says: "Amazing"
    "The Evolution of Penny"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I've always liked these books despite their flimsy story lines and sappy characterizations. There's something comfortable about them and about Ralph Cosham's voice that keeps me returning to this series and helps me overlook the flaws in writing and conception. But this book surprised me.

    This is perhaps the best written and conceived book of the series so far. Penny's confidence is clearly growing as her characters and plot lines gain complexity and depth. The best part is that the ending was entirely a surprise, but not a sloppy one as she is prone to. This ending was clearly thought out, and I'm looking forward to the continued evolution of Penny's writing.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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