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Monte

Clayton, NC, United States | Member Since 2007

23
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 3 reviews
  • 9 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 0 purchased in 2014
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  • Turing's Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 40 mins)
    • By George Dyson
    • Narrated By Arthur Morey
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (118)
    Performance
    (102)
    Story
    (102)

    In the 1940s and '50s, a group of eccentric geniuses - led by John von Neumann - gathered at the newly created Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Their joint project was the realization of the theoretical universal machine, an idea that had been put forth by mathematician Alan Turing. This group of brilliant engineers worked in isolation, almost entirely independent from industry and the traditional academic community. But because they relied exclusively on government funding, the government wanted its share of the results....

    Monte Johnston says: "Needed an editor"
    "Needed an editor"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you try another book from George Dyson and/or Arthur Morey?

    No.


    What was most disappointing about George Dyson’s story?

    What was most disappointing about the story is that there was no story. At different points in the book it seems a story of Von Neumann, the Institute of Advanced Study, the development of computer technology, a hundred other scientists and engineers, etc. It ends up being none of them. It seems more like a collection of notebooks that contained the potential to form a good book or story.

    I was even hoping to learn a bit more of the technology of computers, but all explanations were given in the language of engineers. The book on the Eniac available on audible is much better.


    Did Arthur Morey do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

    The performance was fine.


    What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

    Couldn't have been much more disappointed.


    Any additional comments?

    Save your credits.

    13 of 17 people found this review helpful
  • The Wealth of Nations

    • UNABRIDGED (36 hrs and 47 mins)
    • By Adam Smith
    • Narrated By Gildart Jackson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (180)
    Performance
    (137)
    Story
    (137)

    The foundation for all modern economic thought and political economy, The Wealth of Nations is the magnum opus of Scottish economist Adam Smith, who introduces the world to the very idea of economics and capitalism in the modern sense of the words.

    Frank says: "Loved the Narrator"
    "Amazingly accessible"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Absolutely. I had thought the Smith had anticipated much of our current understanding of the way markets function. Instead, he had all of the fundamentals figured out. I was fearing that it would be quite obscure in topic and language, but found it pleasantly accessible, if perhaps a bit long.

    As as reading the classics, I would definitely recommend this.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    The market.


    What about Gildart Jackson’s performance did you like?

    It fit the material.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    The Way Your World Works


    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Eye of the Red Tsar: A Novel of Suspense

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Sam Eastland
    • Narrated By Paul Michael
    Overall
    (223)
    Performance
    (62)
    Story
    (64)

    Shortly after midnight on July 17, 1918, the imprisoned family of Tsar Nicholas Romanov was awakened and led down to the basement of the Ipatiev house. There they were summarily executed. A decade later, one man lives in purgatory, banished to a forest on the outskirts of humanity. Pekkala was once the most trusted secret agent of the Romanovs, the right-hand man of the Tsar himself. Now he is Prisoner 4745-P. But the state needs Pekkala one last time.

    Meggin says: "Buy This Book Today & Start Listening"
    "Highly recommended"
    Overall

    The pacing of the story was wonderful. Just the right balance between description and action. The narrator is excellent.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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