Call anytime(888) 283-5051
 

You no longer follow Joshua Kim

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Joshua Kim

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Joshua Kim

mostly nonfiction listener

Etna, NH, United States | Member Since 2005

566
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 154 reviews
  • 296 ratings
  • 740 titles in library
  • 43 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
8
FOLLOWERS
312

  • The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By Charles Fishman
    • Narrated By Stephen Hoye
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (236)
    Performance
    (175)
    Story
    (175)

    The water coming out of your tap is four billion years old and might have been slurped by a Tyrannosaurus Rex. We will always have exactly as much water on Earth as we have ever had. Water cannot be destroyed, and it can always be made clean enough for drinking again. In fact, water can be made so clean that it actually becomes toxic. As Charles Fishman brings vibrantly to life in this delightful narrative excursion, water runs our world in a host of awe-inspiring ways, which is both the promise and the peril of our unexplored connections to it.

    Lynn says: "Informative Book"
    "Distilling 'The Big Thirst'"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The big idea in Charles Fishman's excellent The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water is that water is both an essential and scarce resource, and that almost universally governments and individuals have failed to manage this resource.
    Our water failures are across the board.
    We have failed to:

    Put a realistic price on water consumption, allowing politics and sheer lunacy to determine who uses water and how much they use rather than the market and mechanisms of supply and demand.

    Maintain, much less improve, our existing century old water infrastructure (the pipes, pumping stations, waste treatment facilities, reservoirs, etc) - leading to enormous water wastage and risks of water delivery failure.

    Manage existing water supplies intelligently, including our failures to appropriately conserve and re-use water, and our continued insistence on sending high quality drinking water into our toilets and on to our yards and golf courses.
    Educate ourselves about water and the water supply.

    This last failure is, I think, particularly troubling across higher ed. Our students are not going to understand water locally, nationally or globally unless we teach them about water. Water can unify disciplines of economics, sociology, history, political science, chemistry, biology, environmental studies, and many more. We could use water as a lens to understand the interactions of science, history and politics. Water represents a teachable moment.

    Fishman tells the water story by going to places and talking with people who are grappling with the management and delivery of water and water systems. From Vegas to India, Atlanta to Dubai, water economics and water politics are dominating the thinking and planning efforts of many companies and governments. The ed tech folks amongst us will particularly enjoy the description of how water is utilized in the making of computer chips (and be amazed how much embedded water is in your iPad).

    Highly recommended. Smart, engaging, well-written, and disturbing.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Engines of Change: A History of the American Dream in Fifteen Cars

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By Paul Ingrassia
    • Narrated By Sean Runnette
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (108)
    Performance
    (88)
    Story
    (85)

    America was made manifest by its cars. From the assembly lines of Henry Ford to the open roads of Route 66 and Jack Kerouac, America's history is a vehicular history-an idea brought brilliantly to life in this major work by the acclaimed author of Crash Course: The American Automobile Industry's Road from Glory to Disaster.

    Geoffrey says: "My Best listen in a while"
    "Cars, Computers, and "Engines of Change""
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    When I was in 9th grade (in 1984) I subscribed to 4 car magazines: Motor Trend, Car & Driver, Road & Track, and & Automobile. Today, my fondest dream is to own zero cars and to rent an occasional Zip Car (preferably a Prius, Volt, or Leaf) whenever the need for driving should arise.

    Reading "Engines of Change" was a good reminder for me about how important automobiles once loomed in my worldview. At some point my passion for cars was replaced by a passion for computers and technology. At 14 I thought I wanted to be an automotive journalist, and 42 I'm very happy to work at the intersection of education and technology (and to be driving a minivan - slowly).

    I'm betting that my story, one of a shift from a love of automobiles to a love of computers, is not unique. How many teenagers who once spent time changing spark plugs and reading car magazines morphed into building PCs and hanging out on computing message boards? I have this theory that today's computer geeks were yesterday's car enthusiasts - and that is why today's Apple new product announcements are so much more exciting than the new model car launches.

    Ingrassia takes us back to a time when new cars really mattered. He profiles 15 cars that have had a large impact on American culture. These stories are all engaging and well-told, and in learning about the Model T or the Corvette or the Mustang or the Honda Accord we also learn a great deal about the times in which they were introduced. This is not a book about the "15 best cars of all time", rather Ingrassia is interesting in describing the cars that had the biggest cultural impact.

    Ford's Model T literally changed how American society was organized, as an affordable mass produced automobile was a prerequisite to a rural to urban migration and a mobile society. The Honda Accord was the first Japanese car to be built in a U.S. factory (in Ohio), and ushered in a long-term transition away from UAW dominance and the decline of The Big 3. The Chrysler minivan (a Lee Iacocca encore after bringing to life the Mustang) killed the traditional station wagon, empowered a new generation of soccer parents, and eventually led to Mercedes Benz's disastrous and short-lived purchase of Chrysler.

    Ingrassia is a terrific writer, and is also the author of the excellent Crash Course: The American Automobile Industry's Road to Bankruptcy and Bailout-and Beyond. I hope that Ingrassia's next project is about the only cars that really excite me now, cars that run on electricity (although his chapter on the Prius in Engines of Change is excellent).

    I think that there is a huge market of computer geeks (and educational technologists!) just waiting to buy our first batter powered car, as soon as the technology improves and the costs come down to a point where electric cars are nearly competitive with gas powered vehicles.

    15 of 16 people found this review helpful
  • Shakespeare: The World as Stage

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Bill Bryson
    • Narrated By Bill Bryson
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (729)
    Performance
    (300)
    Story
    (294)

    William Shakespeare, the most celebrated poet in the English language, left behind nearly a million words of text, but his biography has long been a thicket of wild supposition arranged around scant facts. With a steady hand and his trademark wit, Bill Bryson sorts through this colorful muddle to reveal the man himself.

    Charles L. Burkins says: "Too Little, Too Short"
    "Concise and Wonderful"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The world, or at least my world, needs more high quality concise books. Bryson's new Shakespeare, from the Eminent Lives Series, is one of the genres better examples.

    The Modern Library Chronicles is another imprint with some excellent texts. To quote from their page:

    "Modern Library Chronicles feature the world's great historians on the world's great subjects. Lively, accessible, and brief (most under 150 pages), these authoritative short histories are designed to appeal to general readers as well as to students in the classroom".

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped the World

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By William J. Bernstein
    • Narrated By Mel Foster
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (177)
    Performance
    (65)
    Story
    (71)

    In A Splendid Exchange, William J. Bernstein tells the extraordinary story of global commerce from its prehistoric origins to the myriad controversies surrounding it today. He transports listeners from ancient sailing ships that brought the silk trade from China to Rome in the second century to the rise and fall of the Portuguese monopoly in spices in the 16th.

    Mark says: "Very interesting and Germane to Today's World"
    "Splendid"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Wonderful, sweeping economic history of the world by one of my favorite writers (Bernstein also wrote "The Birth of Plenty"). These "big" history and "big" thought books are a great antidote to the short time frames and disposable knowledge of our blogging and information overload world. Helps to have a long-term framework to understand our own material lives. Excellent counterpart to Friedman's The World is Flat.

    8 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Gary Marcus
    • Narrated By Stephen Hoye
    Overall
    (112)
    Performance
    (23)
    Story
    (26)

    Are we "noble in reason"? Perfect, in God's image? Far from it, says New York University psychologist Gary Marcus. In this lucid and revealing book, Marcus argues that the mind is not an elegantly designed organ but a "kluge", a clumsy, cobbled-together contraption. He unveils a fundamentally new way of looking at the human mind - think duct tape, not supercomputer - that sheds light on some of the most mysterious aspects of human nature.

    Joshua Kim says: "Elegant"
    "Elegant"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Fascinating extension of the evolutionary psychology framework. Argues that our brains have evolved in often "klugy" ways, meaning that evolution favors what works (and what comes first) and not what is optimal. I learned a good deal about things like memory, emotions, and perception...and now I know why I can be so dumb sometimes. Well written....a fun read.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Buying In: The Secret Dialogue Between What We Buy and Who We Are

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 24 mins)
    • By Rob Walker
    • Narrated By Robert Fass
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (132)
    Performance
    (36)
    Story
    (34)

    Marketing executives and consumer advocates alike predict a future of brand-proof consumers, armed with technology and a sophisticated understanding of marketing techniques, who can effectively tune out ad campaigns. But as Rob Walker demonstrates, this widely accepted misconception has eclipsed the real changes in the way modern consumers relate to their brands of choice. Combine this with marketers' new ability to blur the line between advertising, entertainment, and public space, and you have dramatically altered the relationship between consumer and consumed.

    Thomas says: "Its ok, good info, but I had to force my way"
    "Buy Buying In"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Fun book from the NYTime's Magazine Consumed column...delves into the world of "murketing" - the new method of connecting with consumers who are immune to traditional mass marketing. Some interesting connections on how we could "market" educational technology.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Sam Gosling
    • Narrated By David Drummond
    Overall
    (220)
    Performance
    (41)
    Story
    (45)

    For the last 10 years, psychologist Sam Gosling has been studying how people project (and protect) their inner selves. By exploring our private worlds (desks, bedrooms, even our clothes and our cars), he shows not only how we showcase our personalities in unexpected - and unplanned - ways, but also how we create personality in the first place, communicate it to others, and interpret the world around us.

    GrantLH says: "Buy the hard copy"
    "Start Snooping Around"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    You will never go into someone's house or office in the same way again. A psychologist who pioneered the field of personality research based on peoples stuff.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • The Drunkard's Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Leonard Mlodinow
    • Narrated By Sean Pratt
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2561)
    Performance
    (1503)
    Story
    (1475)

    In this irreverent and illuminating audiobook, acclaimed writer and scientist Leonard Mlodinow shows us how randomness, chance, and probability reveal a tremendous amount about our daily lives, and how we misunderstand the significance of everything from a casual conversation to a major financial setback. As a result, successes and failures in life are often attributed to clear and obvious causes, when in actuality they are more profoundly influenced by chance.

    Joshua Kim says: "Very Very Smart"
    "Very Very Smart"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The author, a physicist at Cal Tech, is among those rare academics who both write beautifully, and can manage to make complex explanations understandable. This book definitely changed how I understand some fundamental aspects of my life and the lives of those around me, as getting a handle on randomness and probability (which again, our brains don't seem to be built easily to accomplish), helps illuminate some of the fundamental errors in judgment that I seem to make all too often.

    20 of 20 people found this review helpful
  • Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Richard H. Thaler, Cass R. Sunstein
    • Narrated By Sean Pratt
    Overall
    (191)
    Performance
    (50)
    Story
    (51)

    Every day, we make decisions on topics ranging from personal investments to schools for our children to the meals we eat to the causes we champion. Unfortunately, we often choose poorly. The reason, the authors explain, is that, being human, we are all susceptible to various biases that can lead us to blunder. Our mistakes can make us poor and unhealthy. We often make bad decisions about education, personal finance, health care, family, and the environment.

    Joshua Kim says: "A Book I Keep Coming Back To"
    "A Book I Keep Coming Back To"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness by Richard H. Thaler, Cass R. Sunstein covers many of the same studies and experiments, and then puts a public policy slant on the conclusions. I'm finding in these sorts of books that the same academic studies and examples pop-up time after time, which is good as it takes me about 5 times to get them straight. Where Sway helped me understand why I'm susceptible to make bad decisions, Nudge helped me understand how I can use the principles of "choice architecture" to influence events and decisions. Both worthwhile reads for folks like us who have a vision of education we are trying to implement, both in terms of why people do things the way they do, and some "libertarian paternalistic" ways to shape decisions and actions.

    9 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Rom Brafman, Ori Brafman
    • Narrated By John Apicella
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (327)
    Performance
    (130)
    Story
    (129)

    A Harvard Business School student pays over $200 for a $20 bill. Washington, D.C., commuters ignore a free subway concert by a violin prodigy. A veteran airline pilot attempts to take off without control-tower clearance and collides with another plane on the runway. Why do we do the wildly irrational things we sometimes do?

    Martin says: "Disappointing book"
    "Swayed"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior by Ori Brafman, Rom Brafman is a sweet, short popularizer of the current social psych and behavioral econ research.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Gut Feelings: The Intelligence of the Unconscious

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Gerd Gigerenzer
    • Narrated By Dick Hill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (172)
    Performance
    (39)
    Story
    (36)

    Gerd Gigerenzer is one of the researchers of behavioral intuition responsible for the science behind Malcolm Gladwell's bestseller Blink. Gladwell showed us how snap decisions often yield better results than careful analysis. Now, Gigerenzer explains why our intuition is such a powerful decision-making tool.

    Joshua Kim says: "My Gut Says You Should Read This Book"
    "My Gut Says You Should Read This Book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The original academic and body of research that Gladwell based his best-selling "Blink" on. Gigerenzer experiments on "fast and frugal" decision making have many implications for situations we face all the time in our lives - I just have not quite worked out if I'm so easily swayed and nudged (see below), and my mental probabilistic machinery is so poor (again see below) when I should trust my gut feelings and when I should do the opposite.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.