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Jeffrey B. Livingston

Jeff Livingston

Columbus, OH USA | Member Since 2005

50
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 3 reviews
  • 66 ratings
  • 1052 titles in library
  • 71 purchased in 2014
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  • Hell's Corner

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By David Baldacci
    • Narrated By Ron McLarty, Orlagh Cassidy
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2522)
    Performance
    (1133)
    Story
    (1140)

    John Carr, aka Oliver Stone-once the most skilled assassin his country ever had-stands in Lafayette Park in front of the White House, perhaps for the last time. The president has personally requested that Stone serve his country again on a high-risk, covert mission. Though he's fought for decades to leave his past career behind, Stone has no choice but to say yes. Then Stone's mission changes drastically before it even begins. It's the night of a state dinner honoring the British prime minister.

    Ramon says: "Great story with nice twists"
    "Why do you need two narrators?"
    Overall

    The switching over to Ms. Cassidy for women's voices is jarring and beyond irritating! Every time it happens, the flow is broken and I find myself removed from the story. It was so bad that on a recent long drive, it was less annoying to listen to talk radio than to lose myself in what might have been a great story. Its hard to be more annoying than Rush Limbaugh but this production has pulled it off.
    I assume that this was an experiment. It has failed. NEVER, NEVER do this again. One story. One Narrator!

    21 of 32 people found this review helpful
  • The Luminaries

    • UNABRIDGED (29 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Eleanor Catton
    • Narrated By Mark Meadows
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (996)
    Performance
    (856)
    Story
    (873)

    It is 1866 and Walter Moody has come to make his fortune upon the New Zealand goldfields. On arrival, he stumbles across a tense gathering of 12 local men, who have met in secret to discuss a series of unsolved crimes. A wealthy man has vanished, a whore has tried to end her life, and an enormous fortune has been discovered in the home of a luckless drunk. Moody is soon drawn into the mystery: a network of fates and fortunes that is as complex and exquisitely patterned as the night sky.

    Allan Cumming says: "Sometimes you need to have a book read to you"
    "Booker Prize Chooses Critics Over Readers"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    The book is too self-consciously into its own structure to the detriment of the narrative. In short, it was written for graduate seminars rather than for readers.


    Did The Luminaries inspire you to do anything?

    Yes. The book inspired me, no longer, to trust the Booker prize as an arbiter of literary merit. For the first time, the prize seems unjustified.


    Any additional comments?

    This is the kind of book that people will lie about having read for decades.

    24 of 32 people found this review helpful
  • South of Broad

    • UNABRIDGED (20 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Pat Conroy
    • Narrated By Mark Deakins
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1194)
    Performance
    (397)
    Story
    (398)

    Against the sumptuous backdrop of Charleston, South Carolina, South of Broad gathers a unique cast of sinners and saints. Leopold Bloom King, our narrator, is the son of an amiable, loving father who teaches science at the local high school. His mother, an ex-nun, is the high school principal and a well-known Joyce scholar. After Leo's older brother commits suicide at the age of 13, the family struggles with the shattering effects of his death, and Leo, lonely and isolated, searches for something to sustain him

    karen says: "Wanted very much to like this book, but....."
    "Mark Deakins should be ashamed!!!"
    Overall

    The novel itself is the kind of wonderful Southern yarn we have come to expect from Pat Conroy but the recording is fatally marred by lazy pronunciation. Deakins should have spent 20 minutes researching pronunciation. The family name Ravenel has so much stress on the final syllable that one is tempted to capitalize the N. Had Dennis even spoken to ONE Charlestonian, he would have learned quickly that the name Huger is pronounced You-Gee, perhaps Who-gee but never, ever " Huggy" The importance of these old Hugenot family names to the story of Charleston's class divide make errors like these a crime against the novel, not just against my South Carolina sensibilities.

    5 of 8 people found this review helpful

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