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Pamela

Member Since 2011

16
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 28 reviews
  • 149 ratings
  • 508 titles in library
  • 49 purchased in 2014
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  • The Wild Blue: The Men and Boys Who Flew the B-24s Over Germany

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Stephen E. Ambrose
    • Narrated By Jeffrey DeMunn
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (187)
    Performance
    (147)
    Story
    (148)

    The very young men who flew the B24s over Germany in World War II against terrible odds were an exemplary band of brothers. In The Wild Blue, Stephen Ambrose recounts their extraordinary brand of heroism, skill, daring, and comradeship. Stephen Ambrose describes how the Army Air Forces recruited, trained, and chose those few who would undertake the most demanding and dangerous jobs in the war.

    jud says: "Terrific book."
    "Tribute to McGovern and his crew"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is an interesting, but not particularly enlightening, book. Ambrose obviously idolizes McGovern. While I admire and am thankful for the sacrifices of the servicemen of WWII, the fact is that they were not all universally selfless and exemplary human beings. There were cowards, cheats, and evil men even in the Army Air Force. You will get no hint of that in this book - everyone was an unmitigated hero, every decision by leadership was fair and wise, no crewmember made foolish and deadly mistakes.

    At no point do any of the claims of former pilots or crew get the scrutiny a true work of research would have required. The 60 year old memories of the brave servicemen often ring more of apocrypha than truth - a bit of flak piercing a map right at the home base of the crew comes to mind.

    There is a mention in passing about the high causalities from frostbite aboard the bombers, but no criticism or discussion of the political decisions that ignored the risk to the young men who lived with the dangerous and frightening situation daily. Ball gunners were subject to horrendously uncomfortable working conditions but did not have a particularly high success rate in protecting their planes, according to other, less awestruck, authors.

    Ambrose did us a service by giving us the story of a single crew. This is the type of book that humanizes war and we all need to understand that it is men, women, sisters, fathers, sons and wives who fight and die in wars.

    The narrator was competent and for a different book would probably be excellent. But he conveys none of the youthful enthusiasm of the airmen then, nor the wistful recollections of the same men today. He presents the book in a straightforward and direct style that is not in keeping with the writing.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Swag

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 14 mins)
    • By Elmore Leonard
    • Narrated By Frank Muller
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (123)
    Performance
    (107)
    Story
    (107)

    The smallest of small-time criminals, Ernest Stickley Jr. figures his luck's about to change when Detroit used-car salesman Frank Ryan catches him trying to boost a ride from Ryan's lot. Frank's got some surefire schemes for getting rich quick - all of them involving guns - and all Stickley has to do is follow "Ryan's Rules" to share the wealth. But sometimes rules need to be bent, maybe even broken, if one is to succeed in the world of crime, especially if the "brains" of the operation knows less than nothing.

    D. Sevener says: "Fun tale, well told, great narration"
    "Second rate crooks are not Elmore's best"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The two primary characters are small time robbers (grocery stores, liquor stores, bars) who ride out their luck until they fall in with some serious guys. They were not particularly appealing personalities to me. I appreciate that they did not intend to hurt anyone, but they are so careless and thoughtless that the inevitable happens.

    The women are not as one-dimensional as some reviewers believe - there are a few women who really move the story forward. The "career girls" by the pool were a 1970s reality - looking for a bit of fun until they had to settle down. Teachers, clerks, models and other career girls were the ones who could afford to live independently in a singles apartment complex. They were as superficial in their relationships as the guy next door, even if that guy was a petty criminal.

    These two guys, however, are not suave and slickly charming; they are insecure, whiny and weak. No one in the book was interesting enough for me to care what happened to them. Many much better Elmore Leonard novels out there (Get Shorty and Pronto come to mind)

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Call of Cthulhu and Other Stories

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By H. P. Lovecraft
    • Narrated By William Roberts
    Overall
    (417)
    Performance
    (363)
    Story
    (369)

    At the heart of these stories, as with all the best of Lovecraft’s work, is the belief that the Earth was once inhabited by powerful and evil gods, just waiting for the chance to recolonise their planet. Cthulhu is one such god, lurking deep beneath the sea until called into being by cult followers who – like all humans – know not what they do.

    Katherine says: "Required reading"
    "Classic but dated"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is clearly a classic of the horror / sci-fi genre but it did not age well to my ear. Not only is the story itself incredible knowing what we do today, but they way the story plays out to stereotypes and prejudice is disturbing. Characters who have physical or mental features different than the "normal" are mistrusted and treated with fear. In all cases that fear is well placed - as if simply being an albino or having large hairy hands makes you much more likely to murder your family.

    That said, this is an author who broke fresh ground and inspired many well respected authors of the last several decades. In that context, it is worth reading (or listening to) for the foundation Lovecraft establishes.

    The narrator is excellent for this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • All the King's Men

    • UNABRIDGED (20 hrs and 57 mins)
    • By Robert Penn Warren
    • Narrated By Michael Emerson
    Overall
    (707)
    Performance
    (343)
    Story
    (337)

    The fictionalized account of Louisiana's colorful and notorious governor, Huey Pierce Long, All the King's Men follows the startling rise and fall of Willie Stark, a country lawyer in the Deep South of the 1930s. Beset by political enemies, Stark seeks aid from his right-hand man Jack Burden, who will bear witness to the cataclysmic unfolding of this very American tragedy.

    Eric Berger says: "Marvelously written and read"
    "Why use 50 words when 500 will do?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Yes, this is a Great American Novel, a classic of its time. The story of a back country crusader who becomes the powerful governor of an unnamed state (which is, of course, Louisiana) carries, at its core, important messages about America, politics and mankind.

    But they are buried under mountains of words. There are intricate descriptions of people who we only glimpse once and never return to the story (anyone remember the man at the California gas station? you listened to 10 minutes about him). Peoples' actions are described multiple times with only slightly different phrases. Nothing is left to the imagination. And that is what I missed most in this book - the way good writing sends my mind reaching for images and stories beyond the words on the page.

    It was also difficult for me to continue with a 20 hour book when I actively dislike the first person character. Yes, he does exhibit strong racist and sexist attitudes, but this was written in the 1940s and takes place in the South, so that is not the problem. But he is amoral man with no beliefs of his own. He is not even interesting - he simply observes interesting things.

    Literature is often complimented for its spare writing, with the bones of the story expressed and the rest only alluded to - a style exemplified by Ernest Hemingway. If the opposite of that style is flowery and overgrown as in Ayn Rand, this story clearly falls into the second group. Too much for my tastes; I do not prefer being smothered by the vines and tendrils of a book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Time Pirate: A Nick McIver Time Adventure

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 21 mins)
    • By Ted Bell
    • Narrated By John Shea
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (74)
    Performance
    (40)
    Story
    (38)

    A thrilling sequel to the instant New York Times best seller Nick of Time, in which the young time traveler Nick McIver must prove his courage once more, on two fronts: in World War Two–era England, where Nazis have invaded his homeland, and in America during the Revolution, where Nick stands shoulder to shoulder with General George Washington.

    Alan says: "Time Pirate"
    "Daring doings by a young English boy"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I have mixed feelings about this book. In the context of an adventure story that every boy dreams of, Time Pirate is hard to beat. But if consistency within a story and within the historical context it takes place is important to you, Time Pirate falls far short.

    Our young hero is resourceful and brave. Great military and political leaders look to him for advice. His foolish exploits always end in success. Victory over the dastardly bad guys is a foregone conclusion. There is not a whiff of nuance or equivocation here.

    But he consistently makes decisions that anyone can see are wrong - and those same great leaders do not challenge him. He does not take action that will clearly further his cause, but may eliminate a few chances for excitement in the book. He has intricate detailed knowledge of military battles and maneuvers in some cases and in others does not demonstrate the most basic understanding of the principles of battle.

    In once scene, a great military leader passes triumphantly through a town, recognized by every soldier he passes. Moments later, he presses the man he has come to see into keeping his presence a closely guarded secret as knowledge of his presence could ruin great plans. Huh? On the occasions he is captured, he is put into custody with all of his worldly possessions, including firearms, knives and the time traveling orb. This does not make sense even to an eight year old.

    But the story does move along and the adventures never stop. John Shea is an excellent narrator for this book although he does exhibit some odd narrative techniques. His pacing is far from steady and some of his voices are caricatures. But, his style seems to work well for this story of pirates, generals, airplanes and ships.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Willful Behavior: A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Donna Leon
    • Narrated By Steven Crossley
    Overall
    (66)
    Performance
    (60)
    Story
    (59)

    Mystery lovers everywhere are addicted to Donna Leon's ever-honorable Commissario Guido Brunetti and her portrayal of Venice's beautiful but sinister byways and canals. In Willful Behavior, Brunetti is approached for a favor by one of his wife's students. Intelligent and serious, Claudia Leonardo asks for his help in obtaining a pardon for a crime once committed by her now-dead grandfather.

    Lawrence says: "Leon Audio Fans Beware!!"
    "Signorina Elettra is NOT a London shopgirl"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As did many other listeners, I had a very difficult time with this narrator. He is not a bad reader - this is simply NOT the series for him. He loses all of the Venetian personality of the story for me. The recurring female characters especially grated on my ear (Signorina Elettra, Paola Brunetti and Chiara Brunetti). Paola's aristocrat father was also way off the mark; to my ear he sounded like a weak, sniveling husk trying to live off the glories of the past (not the man we know from other books in the series).

    I will not give complete blame to the narrator though, as I was shocked at one passage that refereed to Signorina Elettra responding "girlishly" - something we have not seem before or since from the sophisticated, elegant assistant.

    The story was well developed and we met more colorful characters from Guido's past. The tale of trade in illicit artwork is perfect for the machinations of the rusty and ponderous Italian legal system. There are surprise discoveries and sad realizations. Guido makes mistakes and has to compromise justice - something that always breaks his heart. This book is a good addition to the series.

    I, for one, would be happy to buy another copy and listen again if we could have David David Colacci narrate.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Floor of Heaven: A True Tale of the Last Frontier and the Yukon Gold Rush

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Howard Blum
    • Narrated By John H. Mayer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (63)
    Performance
    (43)
    Story
    (44)

    It is the last decade of the 19th century. The Wild West has been tamed and its fierce, independent and often violent larger-than-life figures – gun-toting wanderers, trappers, prospectors, Indian fighters, cowboys, and lawmen –are now victims of their own success. They are heroes who’ve outlived their usefulness.

    Lynn says: "An Entertaining History"
    "Written like fiction"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    And that is not a compliment! The author "documents" the thoughts of the characters, even moments before they die. I know there are diaries and manuscripts, but they would never give the detailed level of dialogue and internal observations that are present here. If this had been sold as a fictionalized account of three characters, I would have been satisfied.

    This is a "tale of the Yukon" and is interesting as that. It is NOT the story of the Yukon and if you come to it expecting a broader view of how and why the Klondike gold rush happened, you will be disappointed. Given those warnings however, it is an amazing story that gives a taste of the character of the times. It is about 30% too long for the subject, but the story moves along and kept me listening.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Astoria: John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson's Lost Pacific Empire: A Story of Wealth, Ambition, and Survival

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Peter Stark
    • Narrated By Michael Kramer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (54)
    Performance
    (50)
    Story
    (51)

    At a time when the edge of American settlement barely reached beyond the Appalachian Mountains, two visionaries, President Thomas Jefferson and millionaire John Jacob Astor, foresaw that one day the Pacific would dominate world trade as much as the Atlantic did in their day. Just two years after the Lewis and Clark expedition concluded in 1806, Jefferson and Astor turned their sights westward once again. Thus began one of history's dramatic but largely forgotten turning points in the conquest of the North American continent.

    L. Lyter says: "Lost History, Found"
    "Daring, greedy men take on nature and natives"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    With scant knowledge of where they are headed or how the world will change while they are en route, two bands of intrepid men head for the Pacific Northwest to assert their dominion over the land and, more importantly, the fur trade.

    Cultural differences between the partners (who have the most to gain financially), voyageurs (French Canadians who are expert boatmen), trappers and the Native Americans lead to ghastly mistakes with deadly consequences. The arrogance of the European mindset is difficult to overcome and the primary barrier a successful expedition.

    Although I have spent much of my life in the Pacific Northwest, this is a story I had never heard. Perhaps that is because their motives were completely financial - no superficial talk about Manifest Destiny or God's will to give a patina of morality. The men were brave and often heroic but they were also stupid, indecisive and foolish. They were so far from home that the only choice was to go on, whatever lay ahead.

    Running two stories along parallel paths can sometimes be difficult to follow, but this book does a good job with both the over-land and sea expeditions. At the very beginning of the book, there is a chapter which actually takes place at almost the close of the story. It comes across as a bit of a gimmick to me - and this story does not need any tricks to keep your interest. The rescue ship in that first chapter is actually one of the least engaging parts of the story.

    Other than that one, admittedly minor, complaint, I thoroughly enjoyed the book and learned a great deal. The reader was good, no distracting tics to bother me. The pace is appropriate to the material.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Beastly Things: A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery, Book 21

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Donna Leon
    • Narrated By David Colacci
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (130)
    Performance
    (107)
    Story
    (105)

    When the body of man is found in a canal, damaged by the tides, carrying no wallet, and wearing only one shoe, Brunetti has little to work with. No local has filed a missing-person report, and no hotel guests have disappeared. Where was the crime scene? And how can Brunetti identify the man when he can’t show pictures of his face? The autopsy shows a way forward: It turns out the man was suffering from a rare, disfiguring disease.

    Julia says: "Worth the credit"
    "Don't listen to this while you eat!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you listen to Beastly Things again? Why?

    Yes, I love this series and the narrator is perfect. This story is the most recent I have read or listened to and the characters continue to evolve. I missed having more about the Brunetti family - those scenes are almost always my favorite in the books.


    Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

    Not this time. It was apparent to me fairly early on what the motive for the crime was and the likely murderer. I still enjoyed watching the unraveling.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    Favorite scene was the funeral very near the end. It brought a tear of compassion to my eye. It was a lovely and fitting tribute to the departed.

    On the flip side, it was very difficult for me to get though the scene at the slaughter house. I am not sure why Brunetti felt they needed the complete tour - perhaps the author wanted to ensure she drove a few readers to become vegetarians.


    Any additional comments?

    If you have an idiot boss or work with well intentioned but incompetent colleagues, you will recognize the world of Guido Brunetti, even if you are not a commissario in the Venetian police. If you are as elegant, smart and clever as Signorina Elettra, well, I am simply envious beyond words!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Land So Strange: The Epic Journey of Cabeza de Vaca

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Andres Resendez
    • Narrated By Jonathan Davis
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (63)
    Performance
    (57)
    Story
    (58)

    In 1528, a mission set out from Spain to colonize Florida. But the expedition went horribly wrong: Delayed by a hurricane, knocked off course by a colossal error of navigation, and ultimately doomed by a disastrous decision to separate the men from their ships, the mission quickly became a desperate journey of survival. Of the 300 men who had embarked on the journey, only four survived - three Spaniards and an African slave.

    David says: "Superb telling of a foundational New World story"
    "We need more history lessons like this"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Why can not history be taught like this? Through the means of an amazing tale we learn about Spanish colonization, navigation, clashes of empires and how our beliefs (religious or otherwise) affect the way we view and interact with different cultures.

    As other reviewers note, Resendez is working with very little documentation and a lot of hearsay and supposition. Only rarely does he push my buttons and jump to unwarranted conclusions: does he really think it is just a likely that these men performed miracles as that the placebo effect or regression to the mean explains the "healings"? The story is rather thin and even a short book like this one is padded in spots with unnecessary background information, but it is worth it to hear this little-known story.

    I believe this is my first listen to Jonathan Davis and I was very pleased with his pronunciation of Spanish names and places. Too often it seems narrators do not take the trouble to learn the appropriate pronunciation.

    Nothing to do with the recording, but I wonder why the cover of the book says "An extraordinary tale of a shipwrecked Spaniard who walked across America" although the book tells the tale of four men - three Spaniards and a black slave and it was not really a shipwreck as we think of one.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Education of Little Tree

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Forrest Carter
    • Narrated By Jeff Woodman
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (256)
    Performance
    (222)
    Story
    (223)

    After his parents die, five-year-old Little Tree goes to live with his grandparents in their cabin deep in the Tennessee mountain hollows. Granpa instructs the boy in the ancient wisdom of “The Way” of honoring nature’s subtle balance. Even when he faces racism and the white authorities try to take him from his grandparents, Little Tree’s understanding and humor sustain him.

    Nancy says: "Comfort food"
    "Heartwarming tale of life in the hollows"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is not a story, rather a narrative by a young boy of what he learned at the knee of his grandfather during the late 1920s. I smiled and laughed at many of the lessons learned and this family made its way into my heart. The only section of the story that does not fit is about an hour towards the end where the action is moved away from the gentle rhythm of the cabin in the woods. I know this was a reality of many Native Americans during the period covered but it seems gratuitous and ill-fitting in this book. The rest of the book is full of lessons for all of us - don't trust politicians, take only what you need and respect the earth. Do not suppose this is a cliche ridden sermon on the evils of civilization - there is nary a cliche to be found and sermons are not to be trusted in this tale. The narrator is excellent and expresses the wide eyed discoveries of a 5 year old without the nasal whiny tone of some narrators when reading a child's voice. If you love your family, you will understand the hearts of Little Tree and his grandparents.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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