Call anytime(888) 283-5051
 

You no longer follow Anne

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Anne

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Anne

Overland Park, Kansas, United States | Member Since 2011

3
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 15 reviews
  • 15 ratings
  • 462 titles in library
  • 32 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
1

  • The Lonesome Gods

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Louis L'Amour
    • Narrated By David Strathairn
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (227)
    Performance
    (167)
    Story
    (169)

    The Lonesome Gods is Louis L'Amour's biggest and most important historical novel to date, a sweeping adventure of the California frontier. Here is the fascinating story of Johannes Verne, a young man left to die by his vengeful grandfather, rescued by outlaws and raised in part by the Indians of the desert.

    Richard says: "Good Oater"
    "Good, but not the best work of L'Amour"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What did you like best about The Lonesome Gods? What did you like least?

    I really like L'Amour for his plots, and frequently his descriptive phrases and dialogues are peerless. This book needed editing, and definitely follows his formula, but it wanders much more than what he usually wrote, and only one of the women is well written. I would still buy and listen to this again, but I can't see going back to it for a second review down the road. David Straitharn is also well, well matched to reading L'Amour and delivers again. However, if I had a limited budget, I would choose other L'Amour works like Skyliners, Treasure Mountain, or anything else in that series (the Sackett family chronicles). L'Amour got on his soapbox way too much in this novel rather than telling the story and having philosophical thoughts thrown in casually as he has done in other works.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Lonesome Gods?

    When the Russian agent suddenly realizes that not only is the escaped Russian he's targeting for return to Russia free to stay in California but also that the US Government isn't going to force her to return and, by the way, the agent himself could stay and make a new life for himself in California.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    When Miss Nesselrode confronts the grandfather who has been trying to have his grandson killed because the grandson is the product of a marriage his daughter made with a seaman--tainting the pure Spanish blood the overly proud grandfather prizes. Also enjoyed the tactics our hero and his crew use to overcome superior numbers each time his horses and his life are threatened.


    Do you think The Lonesome Gods needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    No, and since I didn't care for the wet blanket our hero fell in love with, I didn't want to see any more of her.


    Any additional comments?

    Still like L'Amour, and still liked the book, just thought this one was not one of his better ones.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Daniel James Brown
    • Narrated By Edward Herrmann
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1378)
    Performance
    (1254)
    Story
    (1265)

    Daniel James Brown's robust book tells the story of the University of Washington's 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.

    Janice says: "Do you believe in miracles??"
    "Amazing, all the more impressive since true"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Most of us don't row, and we don't row competitively. This is so well written that you are intrigued by the technical aspects of rowing, but you are absolutely captivated by the people a lved this piece of history. Each individual is well painted and integrated and Brown has given us context so we can feel the Great Depression and the stunning struggle just to get food, much less get to college and make the rowing team. The "boys" were all sons of miners and farmers and shopkeepers and yet achieved the distinction of becoming the finest rowing team in history. Edward Hermann always delivers a fantastic presentation, but he was given a book that serves his talents well--that tells the story of the times, the obstacles, the character and heart of the individuals involved, and the breath-taking outcome. You will miss a great book and a great performance if this doesn't hit your preferred list. You will be moved, astonished, grieving, and joyous with all the characters.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • More Than Words Can Say: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Robert Barclay
    • Narrated By Cassandra Campbell
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (46)
    Performance
    (36)
    Story
    (40)

    Chelsea Enright never expected to inherit her grandmother's lakeside cottage deep in the Adirondacks - a serene getaway that had been mysteriously closed up decades ago. This is no simple bequest, however, because when Chelsea finds her grandmother's World War II diaries, she's stunned to discover that they hold secrets she never suspected - and they have the power to turn her own life upside down.

    Patti says: "Oh Lordy"
    "Melodramatic"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I can't honestly tell if the story ever got any better. The first 30 minutes introduced a bit of the mystery but also characters that I had no sympathy or interest in. I am sorry I bought this and will avoid anything by this author again. So if you like cliches and stereotypes, go for this but otherwise don't waste your time

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Lady Fortescue Steps Out: The Poor Relation, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By M. C. Beaton
    • Narrated By Davina Porter
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (520)
    Performance
    (448)
    Story
    (452)

    Life is not easy for the poor relations of England’s upper crust, but fate and clever schemes bring them together. Lady Fortescue and Colonel Sandhurst hatch a plan: What if they were to transform her decrepit Bond Street home into a posh hotel, offering their guests the pleasure of being waited upon by nobility? With the help of other down-and-out aristocrats, they do just that, and London’s newest hotel, The Poor Relation, is born. The establishment is an immediate hit with London’s most illustrious citizens, save the Duke of Rowcester....

    connie says: "sweet but overpriced trifle"
    "Playing Fast and Loose with Regency Style"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    M. C. Beaton normally writes contemporary mysteries. This isn't, of course, a mystery, and the plot is fine, the characters are all right, but it is neither bodice-ripper (thank goodness) nor comedy of manners based on the constraints of the period in which it is set. While it would have short-circuited the plot to have the protagonists display the background expected, it seems just silly to propose the idea that a gentlewoman would have learned how to cook so well that she would have been able to turn out multi-course meals appropriate in fine dining establishments during the Napoleonic era. And that a gentleman would be so intemporate in his language to one of his own class. So this is definitely fluff and if you aren't looking for Jane Austen or Finess it is just fine but be prepared to roll your eyes if you keep listening.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Invisible Prey

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 7 mins)
    • By John Sandford
    • Narrated By Richard Ferrone
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1458)
    Performance
    (454)
    Story
    (462)

    In the richest neighborhood of Minneapolis, two elderly women lie murdered in their home, killed with a pipe, the rooms tossed, only small items stolen. It is clearly the random work of someone looking for money to buy drugs. But as Davenport looks more closely, he begins to wonder whether the items are actually so small and the victims so random; if there might not be some invisible agenda at work here. Gradually, a pattern begins to emerge, and it leads him to...certainly nothing he ever expected.

    Sheryl Baumgart says: "Another great read"
    "Great plot, writing slightly awkward"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you try another book from John Sandford and/or Richard Ferrone?

    I liked the plot well enough to give the writer another chance. Actually, the thing that I continually find awkward is the gratuitous use of bad language--not to heighten the drama or express a character's frustration, but just to sound contemporary. A surgeon who isn't even mildly irritated uses bad language, and so do several other characters who are supposedly educated and affluent. So as you are listening, the effect is jarring. Anyone who has ever used a computer will at times be at their wit's end, and probably teenagers would drive you to think one or two of those words, but just for shock value this interrupts the narrative. Where you can skim in reading it yourself, this language pretty much jumps at you while you are listening. But good story; plausible and intriguing, so will try one more by Sandford and see if he was just on a tear or whether he likes this style of writing.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Killing Lincoln: The Shocking Assassination That Changed America Forever

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 49 mins)
    • By Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard
    • Narrated By Bill O'Reilly
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3866)
    Performance
    (3444)
    Story
    (3463)

    The anchor of The O'Reilly Factor recounts one of the most dramatic stories in American history—how one gunshot changed the country forever. In the spring of 1865, the bloody saga of America's Civil War finally comes to an end after a series of increasingly harrowing battles. President Abraham Lincoln's generous terms for Robert E. Lee's surrender are devised to fulfill Lincoln's dream of healing a divided nation. But one man and his band of murderous accomplices are not appeased....

    Daniel says: "History Made Interesting"
    "Worth listening to, but not necessarily a rave"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

    I did like this, but was perplexed in that O'Reilly reviews the events from 14 days out to July after the assassination; he didn't link events on the battlefield to the assassination and you had the feeling that Wilkes-Booth would still have planned on assassination regardless of the last desperate battles between Union and Rebel armies. He also tantalized us with evidence that Sec of War Stanton might have had a bit to do with the assassination, but there was no link to the conspirators that was explained. I dislike writing in present tense, and it worked all right here, but I thought this was a good book rather than a great book. Interesting content.


    What three words best describe Bill O'Reilly’s voice?

    Steady, however it was odd that he mispronounced words like gelatinous and endometriosis--would have thought he would have looked those up!


    Was Killing Lincoln worth the listening time?

    Definintely.


    Any additional comments?

    It has been on the New York Times best seller list, and while better than many things you could listen to, couldn't quite see why it was so far up. Buy this on sale and you will really enjoy it!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Corduroy Mansions: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By Alexander McCall Smith
    • Narrated By Simon Prebble
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (356)
    Performance
    (240)
    Story
    (239)

    In London’s Pimlico neighborhood lies a tenement described in architectural guides as “a building of no interest whatsoever.” But the residents of Corduroy Mansions—including a literary agent, a wine merchant, a thoroughly unpleasant member of Parliament, and a vegetarian dog—are a rather fascinating lot.

    connie says: "Oedipus Snark, MP"
    "Skip this book"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you ever listen to anything by Alexander McCall Smith again?

    Yes, but not in a hurry.


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    I only listened to the first 30 minutes and then determined to return it. In that time, 6 characters were introduced and every last one of them was so ignorant or selfish that you couldn't find any one of them you had the least bit of curiousity about. I had listened to a couple of McCall-Smith's books before, and he can be a slow started, but this must have been done just to meet a contract deadline. (Probably why it was on sale . . . )


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Adventure of English: The Biography of a Language

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By Melvyn Bragg
    • Narrated By Robert Powell
    Overall
    (1952)
    Performance
    (743)
    Story
    (759)

    This is the remarkable story of the English language; from its beginnings as a minor guttural Germanic dialect to its position today as a truly established global language. The Adventure of English is not only an enthralling story of power, religion, and trade, but also the story of people, and how their lives continue to change the extraordinary language that is English.

    Amazon Customer says: "Many Of Course monments"
    "Hang in there, it gets better as you go along"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

    Have you ever wondered where our peculiar phrases and words come from? Pass the buck, cowboy, okay, etc? Melvyn Bragg tells the story of the language as it developed and incorporated influences and went on to influence other languages. He is a bit slow at the start, but you should be intrigued because he makes the case that at the time of World War II a man from mid-Britain could make himself understood in Iceland within a couple of weeks--the pronunciation and grammar of two languages having so much still in common. Bragg goes on to follow the tale of English when it survived due to intervention by Alfred the Great, when it flourished so much that it outlasted incursion by French conquerers, tinkering and explosion in the New World, etc. The second half moves along much more quickly, but the first half, which concludes with the impact of Shakespeare on the langugage is well worth listening to.


    What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

    Pretty steady, but you could tell that the speaker was unfamiliar with several North American frontier introductions--his pronunciation of lasso is a hoot, but you still enjoy his reading.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Little Princes: One Man's Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Conor Grennan
    • Narrated By Conor Grennan
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (519)
    Performance
    (365)
    Story
    (375)

    In search of adventure, 29-year-old Conor Grennan traded his day job for a year-long trip around the globe, a journey that began with a three-month stint volunteering at the Little Princes Children's Home, an orphanage in war-torn Nepal. Conor was initially reluctant to volunteer, unsure whether he had the proper skill, or enough passion, to get involved in a developing country in the middle of a civil war. But he was soon overcome by the herd of rambunctious, resilient children.

    Angela says: "Amazing experience + Inspiring tale"
    "Fun, Moving, and Captivating"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    I have already recommended this to several. It starts off just a bit glib, but you will be engaged very quickly and amazed at the story it is telling of the "orphan" children in Nepal. Due to fears of the parents in mountainous regions that their children will be taken by guerrilla forces and forced into their own army, unscrupulous child traffickers convinced hundreds (or more) families to give up all their resources and their children to the traffickers who promised that these children would be taken to the cities and given a good education. Then they are abandoned or sold as child labor or starved but trotted out to display to tourists to encourage donations. The author--reading his work--had planned to work in one of the well-run orphanages for 3 months before he spent the year going around the world. He did go around the world, but felt compelled to go back and eventually began to tackle the plight of several of these children. He always intended this to be temporary but the longer he worked around the children, the more his heart changed. Terrific book, and gets increasingly compelling with both tragedy and deep happiness. This is one of the two best books I listened to in the entire year.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Little Princes?

    When Connor (author) finds that one of the "orphans" has been told his family all died at least 10 years ago, and his family have been told this boy died. Although it isn't simple to reunite the children--somehing so complicated that you have to listen to the circumstances to understand this--it is amazing that anyone would be committed to hiking in areas to find the "orphans" families where there are no roads, where altitude is not an ally, and where help is seasonal because flights stop in fall during the change in weather.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Barbara Demick
    • Narrated By Karen White
    Overall
    (1602)
    Performance
    (1012)
    Story
    (1017)

    Barbara Demick's Nothing to Envy follows the lives of six North Koreans over fifteen years - a chaotic period that saw the death of Kim Il-sung and the unchallenged rise to power of his son, Kim Jong-il, and the devastation of a far-ranging famine that killed one-fifth of the population. Taking us into a landscape never before seen, Demick brings to life what it means to be an average Korean citizen, living under the most repressive totalitarian regime today.

    Gohar says: "The man who wants to be GOD"
    "Best Non Fiction you may read this year"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    I bought this on sale because I have a good friend whose parents emigrated from Soouth Korea and I knew very little of either country. Since then I have recommended this to at least 8 people; it is dramatic, appalling, and amazing--Nothing to Envy is what the North Korean government tells its people even as it ensures they are starving, without electricity most of the time, and brutally stripped of any personal, academic, or industrial opportunities. This work is from a reporter stationed in South Korea who met and interviewed several of the very, very few North Koreans who had escaped from the North. From their stories you understand how it is that the North Korean government is able to control its people, why such a tiny number of citizens ever escaped, and why both South Korea and the United States are portrayed as the arch enemies of the North Korean people. You will hear from a schoolteacher, a doctor, and a true believer whose daughter tricked her into escaping; these and several other personal stories are interwoven with Korean history so that you can put their stories in context. Very well written, very timely.


    What other book might you compare Nothing to Envy to and why?

    I can't think of any that has a similar flavor; if there is something comparable I haven't read that yet.


    What about Karen White’s performance did you like?

    She is not overly dramatic, speaks clearly, and moves the story forward with a nice pace.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    Shock. After the first few minutes, you pause because you can't believe any government would be so short-sighted and would not only engineer its own failure but continue to do things to perpetuate the problems.


    Any additional comments?

    You will be missing a remarkable book if you pass this one by.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Micro: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 53 mins)
    • By Michael Crichton, Richard Preston
    • Narrated By John Bedford Lloyd
    Overall
    (784)
    Performance
    (673)
    Story
    (684)

    In a locked Honolulu office building, three men are found dead with no sign of struggle except for the ultrafine, razor-sharp cuts covering their bodies. The only clue left behind is a tiny bladed robot, nearly invisible to the human eye. In the lush forests of Oahu, groundbreaking technology has ushered in a revolutionary era of biological prospecting. Trillions of microorganisms, tens of thousands of bacteria species, are being discovered; they are feeding a search for priceless drugs and applications on a scale beyond anything previously imagined.

    Amanda says: "Honey, I Shrunk Your I.Q."
    "Missing vital Crichton elements"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What would have made Micro better?

    Crichton was superb at taking science and stretching its possibilities to create new environments with surprising challenges--and that is done really well in this book, but he never would have killed off nearly every character. Halfway through you are wondering if any are going to survive, and the evil characters are just stupid. Are we meant to think that an enterprise desperate for graduate students in science would take a blow-hard who only writes critiques about theory and would pay for him to come see a top-secret project? How in the world did it make sense to set up one character as the protagonist and kill him off, plus appear to kill off all but two of the "good guys"? We didn't even care about the ones who survived, and couldn't we at least have saved the surprise helper at Tantalus? This needed different plot points and better editing, plus a resolution that didn't make you feel that you had wasted almost the entire time you spent listening.


    Has Micro turned you off from other books in this genre?

    No, but I will be extremely careful ordering other books where another author (and this one is a good author, but he either didn't save Crichton or just didn't deliver on this book) has finished Crichton's posthumous material.


    Have you listened to any of John Bedford Lloyd’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    No, but I thought he did well.


    Any additional comments?

    Save your money and your time. If it goes on sale for $4.95, it will be worth that, but you will still be annoyed at what is a great start devolving into a frustrating experience.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.