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Joel

Columbia, MD, United States | Member Since 2009

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  • Heretics of Dune: Dune Chronicles, Book 5

    • UNABRIDGED (18 hrs and 8 mins)
    • By Frank Herbert
    • Narrated By Simon Vance, Scott Brick
    Overall
    (760)
    Performance
    (424)
    Story
    (428)

    On Arrakis, now called Rakis, known to legend as Dune, 10 times 10 centuries have passed. The planet is becoming desert again. The Lost Ones are returning home from the far reaches of space. The great sandworms are dying, and the Bene Gesserit and the Bene Tleilax struggle to direct the future of Dune. The children of Dune's children awaken as from a dream, wielding the new power of a heresy called love.

    John says: "Mixed Feelings"
    "The opera continues"
    Overall

    Operatic. That's the Dune series...lots of machinations over long periods of time, interrupted by brief spates of action. More happens in Heretics of Dune than in the last few books, but most of the activity occurs off-stage, as it were.

    First off, this is the fifth in Frank Herbert's Dune series; they won't make much sense if you don't experience them in order.

    It is 1500 years since the death of Leto II, the God Emperor (a/k/a the Tyrant), and the planet Arrakis/Dune is now called Rakis and is desert once more. The factions of the Duniverse (mostly the Bene Gesserit, the Tleilaxu, the priests of the God Emperor and the newly arrived Honoured Matres) are maneuvering for control of the all important spice. The balance is upset when a young girl who can commune with the worms arrives from the desert.

    As is the case with all of Herbert's Dune books, Heretics is a slow-mover. The story is the characters and their machinations, rather than starship and laser battles. There are more "action" bits (i.e. the starships and lasers) than the previous few books, but they are mostly referred to after the fact and not narrated directly (which is irritating).

    My opinions on this book are mixed. The story itself is interesting, but slow. The prose is great but the story feels disjointed in places.

    I still like Simon Vance's narration.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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