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Ann

Seattle, WA, United States | Member Since 2006

ratings
117
REVIEWS
6
FOLLOWING
3
FOLLOWERS
0
HELPFUL VOTES
6

  • The Most Dangerous Game

    • UNABRIDGED (50 mins)
    • By Richard Cornell
    • Narrated By Mike Vendetti
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    Why do you suppose some combat veterans give up the sport of hunting? Is it because they gain empathy with the hunted, or hunting a prey less cunning than they has lost its allure. Richard Connell, in this short story “The Most Dangerous Game” takes us where the hunter becomes the hunted. This hunter is not being hunted by a beast less cunning or calculating than he is, like a lion or a tiger. No, this hunter is a master at his craft, crueler and only slightly better armed than he is.

    Ann says: "Good presentation of a great story ..."
    "Good presentation of a great story ..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I've loved this book since I stumbled upon it a number of years ago. I'm not usually a fan of short stories, but this one is so tightly plotted and suspenseful that it feels like you've finished an entire book by the time you're done. This reading is a good one - the narrator has a fairly deep and slightly rough voice that is a great match for the subject, and he rachets up the tension just enough as the story progresses. It's a great short listen!

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Mote in Andrea's Eye

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 15 mins)
    • By David Niall Wilson
    • Narrated By Karyn O'Bryant
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    A young girl, Andrea Jamieson, loses her father, who is trying to rescue a neighbor during a hurricane. She grows up to become a hurricane ''hunter'' and, through her own efforts and those of her husband and colleagues, accidentally creates the largest hurricane in history. Then it disappears in the Devil's Triangle. So does her husband, flying over the storm to drop Silver Iodide crystals into the eye. Then, 30 years later, the storm - and the plane - are back.

    Ann says: "An excellent book!"
    "An excellent book!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I just finished this audiobook and I am still a bit wide-eyed. I really enjoyed it, and the last half was like a roller coaster ride, it just kept building tension until the last few minutes. This author knows how to keep my attention, that's for certain! I thought the premise of this story was very interesting – fighting hurricanes juxtaposed with the Bermuda Triangle – but the novel was even better than I had hoped. The first half, with explanations of how hurricanes can be fought, had just enough technical information to keep us science geeks happy but not drowning in the details. Although I did keep wondering what the results of an Environmental Impact Statement on the methods would be these days, it didn't detract from the story at all. For the big storms, people just want to save lives and will do almost anything to accomplish that goal. The second half of the book, once a giant storm had appeared as if by magic (see previous Bermuda Triange reference) really pulled me along. I usually listen to books during meals, and I found myself sitting and listening with a fork hanging in the air. And lunches took a bit longer than usual. The descriptions in this book are quite vivid, and kept me visualizing the scenes and almost feeling that I was right there with the characters. I had to listen to the last two hours without stopping, because I couldn't wait to find out whether Mother Nature or Man won the battle … I thought the narrator was excellent for this reading. I don't think I've listened to her before, but I certainly would again. I suspect her voice and delivery style were part of what drew me along so well thru the narrative – she blended into the story so well that I didn't once consider what I liked or disliked about her reading until the book was done. I can't even now comment on what I liked, except to say that her tone of voice and pacing was very comfortable to my ear. But she let the story flow thru her exceptionally well, in my opinion. So, an excellent narration of an absorbing story, and I will definitely be reading more by this author.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Aliens in the Backyard: UFOs, Abductions, and Synchronicity

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 46 mins)
    • By Rob MacGregor, Trish MacGregor
    • Narrated By Kevin Pierce
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (49)
    Performance
    (47)
    Story
    (46)

    In 2003, a Roper Organization survey revealed that 33 million Americans may be abductees. Aliens in the Backyard is their story. One evening in 1981, Connie J Cannon was on I-75 with her young son, en route to their new home in Florida, when they suddenly found themselves on a military base, with a man in uniform holding a gun to her head as three Grays stood nearby. In 1979, Diane Fine was on her way from upstate New York to Vermont to see an obstetrics specialist for her high risk pregnancy, and experienced two hours of missing time. When she was finally examined at the clinic, she was told wasn't pregnant.

    Mike N. Clelland says: "very well written"
    "A fascinating subject ..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was fascinated by the description of this book, and once I started listening, the fascination continued. Rob and Trish MacGregor have written an excellent account of their exploration of alien encounters and alien abduction. Partly because there is little to no obvious judgment on their part on whether the encounters actually happened, I was able to reserve judgment and just listen to what they had discovered. They have an excellent ability to simply describe the events and let the reader decide for themselves what has really happened. I started the book feeling fairly skeptical, for although I absolutely admit to the probability of “otherness”, I have not had much contact with or done much research into this subject, and skeptical is usually where I start. By the end of the book, however, the descriptions of encounters by varied individuals and couples had me shaking my head and wondering … could it really be? The descriptions were clear and pulled me right along, and it was amazing how much commonality could be found between them. And synchronicity – how did I miss this word all my life? I had to go look up the definition, and then I was shouting “YES!” because I have felt the synchronicity in the world so many times without knowing what to call it. I learned quite a bit from this book, and consider it well worth the read for anyone wishing to know something about the subject without a “hard sell” approach. I thought the narrator, Kevin Pierce, was excellent for this type of book. His style was calm, clear, low key, and fairly slow, which worked very well for this subject matter. I probably wouldn't have enjoyed that type of delivery for a suspense novel, but for this one I thought it was perfect. The book translated quite well to audio, except for one complaint. I occasionally became confused as to who was speaking, the narrator or the person having the experience. I liked the style of writing with a main narrator throughout and various people’s experiences interwoven into the story, but a few more “he said,” or “she said” would have been helpful for the audio version. (I never thought I would say that!) But it was a minor complaint in the overall reading of an excellent book by a very appropriate narrator.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Agnes Day: Book Three of the Quest for the White Duck

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By Charles L. Grant
    • Narrated By Jack Chekijian
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    Book Three of the Quest for the White Duck. Gideon Sunday, an ex-football player who found himself mysteriously transported to the magical world of Chey, must find a way to stop Agnes, the evil wife of the sorcerer Wamchu.

    Ann says: "A satisfying conclusion ..."
    "A satisfying conclusion ..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This conclusion to the trilogy, The Quest for the White Duck, was a very satisfying read. There are some great visuals in this book – an elevator with a different monster to defeat on each level, a forest of fire, and of course the bridge between worlds makes another appearance. Our hero, Gideon, is again confronted with a quest, this time to save the world once and for all from the horrifying Agnes, who comes into her total power on “her day”. But before Gideon embarks on this quest, the bridge to the pantry in his house reopens, and his experiences when he crosses back to his own world give new meaning to the phrase “You can’t go home again.” All the significant threads woven throughout the first two books are neatly wrapped up by the end of this book, and Gideon even gets the girl – sort of. Jack Checkijian was again the reader, and his wonderful story-telling style and ability to get the most out of the humorous situations in the book is a definite plus. I don’t think reading the paper book would be nearly as good!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Web of Defeat: Book Two of the Quest for the White Duck

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 4 mins)
    • By Charles L. Grant
    • Narrated By Jack Chekijian
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    When Gideon Sunday is handed a ball, he takes it and runs. Unfortunately, the game this unemployed football player has found himself in will probably get him killed. The minute he stepped through his pantry door into the magical land of Chey, Gideon Sunday knew that the last thing he ever wanted to be was a hero. He has been trying to go home ever since. But the events that landed him in this most bewildering land now conspire to strand him forever, and Gideon is desperate.

    Ann says: "The quest continues ..."
    "The quest continues ..."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I love finding a new series to enjoy, and the second book of The Quest for the White Duck trilogy doesn’t disappoint! I was glad to see that humor is an integral part of this novel, just as it is in the first book. Our hero, Gideon, successfully completed his quest in the first book, and at the beginning of the second is a bit at loose ends, wondering what he should be doing now with his life, in this strange new world beyond his pantry door. But before he arrives at a workable solution, a new emergency (luckily) arises, and Gideon must put away his angst and introspection and once again play the hero. This book has a dragon, a giant, and witches, in addition to a few other nasty little critters. Gideon and his team, including the giant’s niece, his friend the goat-horse Red, and the White Duck and her beau, take them all on, and though the outcome is in question a number of times, the conclusion is quite satisfactory. I was happy that Jack Checkijian was again the reader for this book, as he handles the humor and Gideon’s questioning of his quest mates so well. I can’t wait to listen to the third book!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Blood River Down - Book I of the Quest of the White Duck

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Charles L. Grant, Lionel Fenn
    • Narrated By Jack Chekijian
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (10)
    Performance
    (10)
    Story
    (10)

    Gideon Sunday, an ex-semi-professional American Football player, goes to his pantry to retrieve an awful bottle of his (dead) sister's fruit preserves. When he gets there, he discovers a meadow in his pantry. He closes the door, takes a few breaths, and begins to investigate. Upon discovering that A) no one is playing a trick on him, B) there really IS a meadow in his cupboard, and C) there is something three-quarters of ugly coming out of it, he decides to beat a monster to death with a baseball bat.

    Ann says: "A quest with humor ... and a white duck!"
    "A quest with humor ... and a white duck!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. If you're looking for non-stop action, edge-of-your-seat suspense, or a complicated mystery, this is definitely not the book for you, but it does have its own special charm. It's a book about a guy, Gideon Sunday, who is pretty down on his luck and knows it, but isn't really sure what to do about it. Then a very strange world opens up in his pantry ... yep, right there off the kitchen. He kills a monster and then accepts a challenge to help a lovely young lady from that world, and so begins his quest. The reader, Jack Checkijian, has a comfortable story-telling tone and does an excellent job of conveying both Gideon's faint bewilderment with his situation and his dry humor when things go wrong, as they inevitably do. Because, though his partners in the quest don't really want to tell him anything about it - ever! - he does eventually find out that he is on a quest for a duck ... a white duck. The reason for the quest, and the significance of the duck, only become clear near the end of the book, and Gideon's lack of understanding contributes to some priceless moments of humor. I thought this book was great low-key entertainment. Because really, who could resist a quest for a white duck???

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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