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Bruce Kent

chiefkent

Gulfport, MS USA | Member Since 2006

ratings
1220
REVIEWS
12
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
5
HELPFUL VOTES
47

  • Ghost: Paladin of Shadows, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By John Ringo
    • Narrated By Jeremy Arthur
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (458)
    Performance
    (428)
    Story
    (433)

    Former SEAL Michael Harmon, Team Name ''Ghost'', retired for service injuries, is not enjoying college life. But things are about to change, if not for the better. When he sees a kidnapping, a series of, at the time logical, decisions leave him shot to ribbons and battling a battalion of Syrian commandos with only the help of three naked co-eds who answer to the names ''Bambi,'' ''Thumper'' and ''Cotton Tail.'

    Jenassecret says: "Military-Erotica! I want MORE!!!"
    "Not For the Mild of Heart"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Having read most of John Ringo's previous works I thought that I knew what to expect when purchasing this book. Most of his other works are 'straight' escapist military sci-fi with a healthy dose of Tea Party leaning under-leanings. So once one gets over the rants, there are some really well constructed action, interesting characters and storylines.

    Without giving major spoilers, this book is divided into 3 distinct books. The first and last are primarily escapist 2005 era military action macho fiction, sandwiched around some very heavy S&M action, The second book in all honesty made me feel very uncomfortable just listening to and didn't feel transitory or logical to developments in the last book. I did keep thinking that the author either had some interesting research for this character or revealed way too much about himself!!

    I enjoy military and military sci-fi as escapism and brain candy and so have a low suspension of belief for the structures within which the authors of these genres create fictional little worlds. My problem here is that it's hard to see if Ringo is attempting to give a character who harnesses his base urges constructively, or if this is titillation, strange titillation.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Fighter Pilot: The Memoirs of Legendary Ace Robin Olds

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Robin Olds, Christina Olds, Ed Rasimus
    • Narrated By Robertson Dean
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (672)
    Performance
    (403)
    Story
    (403)

    A larger-than-life hero with a towering personality, Robin Olds was a graduate of West Point and an inductee in the National College Football Hall of Fame for his All-American performance for Army. In World War II, Olds quickly became a top fighter pilot and squadron commander by the age of 22—a double ace with twelve aerial victories. But it was in Vietnam where the man became a legend.

    R. A. Frank says: "Top Notch Audiobook"
    "Best Military Memoir since U.S. Grant"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This memoir was written from various scraps that BGen Olds had jotted down, typed, and placed into his computer over the years, and then masterfully assembled by his daughter and friend into an extremely listenable first person format while he was dying from Stage 4 prostate cancer, (he died from congestive heart failure).

    Robin Olds' career stretched from the skies over Germany to the skies of Vietnam, and from the halls of West Point to the mountains of Colorado Springs. A Colonel in his early 30's Olds' fighter pilot mentality went against the prevailing "bomber" and "missile" generals who ran the USAF from the founding of the USAF to the 1990's.

    His vivid recollections of air to air combats are textbook, as are his memories of duty in the Pentagon lessons on how NOT to get promoted. Since this is a first person narration, some of his accomplishments are omitted, but all of his antagonist actions towards higher echelons of command are listed in detail.

    Unfortunately his tendency to over imbibe is noted. While writing about his movie star wife he is over sympathetic. Her career was already on a down swing when they married and nothing to do with his service.

    Mr. Dean's narration is right on save his lack of Robin Olds' slight Texas twang! This is a book that I'll come back to re-listen repeatedly!

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Enterprise: America’s Fightingest Ship and the Men Who Helped Win World War II

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Barrett Tillman
    • Narrated By Tom Weiner
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (52)
    Performance
    (46)
    Story
    (48)

    America’s most decorated warship of World War II, Enterprise was constantly engaged against the Japanese Empire, earning the title “the fightingest ship” in the navy. Her career was eventful, vital, and short. Commissioned in 1938, her bombers sank a submarine just ten days after the Pearl Harbor attack, claiming the first Japanese vessel lost in the war.

    Aser Tolentino says: "Great Bio of a Truly Remarkable Ship"
    "Meandering History"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Overall a very good history of the 'Big E', but way too much filler with bios of and side histories. I recognize the methodology as I've used it myself when I've come up short for material on the primary subject! Smooth narration.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • The Union War

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Gary W. Gallagher
    • Narrated By Mel Foster
    Overall
    (18)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (12)

    Even 150 years later, we are haunted by the Civil War---by its division, its bloodshed, and perhaps, above all, by its origins. Today, many believe that the war was fought over slavery. This answer satisfies our contemporary sense of justice, but as Gary W. Gallagher shows in this brilliant revisionist history, it is an anachronistic judgment.

    Bruce Kent says: "Non-revisionist"
    "Non-revisionist"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Dr. Gallagher focuses the Civil War in historical terms of the 19th Century, stripping away the political correctness attributions revised since the civil rights era of the 1960's of the North fighting to free the slaves. Yes, slavery was the issue that cause the secession of the southern states, but the the northern states were fighting to retain the Union, with slavery if necessary but one country. He ties the concept of 'Manifest Destiny' with the principles of the Declaration of Independence to explain why the people of the north fought the Civil War, in their own words.

    The recent crop of histories and documentaries have been maintaining that the northern states fought primarily to free the slaves. There was a reason that Lincoln couldn't issue the Emancipation Proclamation until late 1863 - political suicide. Only a minority of northern citizens supported emancipating the slaves until it was put into terms of destroying the southern economy and hastening the end of the war. Saving the Union was the primary purpose that both new immigrants and established citizens of the northern states volunteered for Federal Service.

    Mel Foster does yeoman work narrating Dr. Gallagher's work.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • FDR's Folly: How Roosevelt and His New Deal Prolonged the Great Depression

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Jim Powell
    • Narrated By William Hughes
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (205)
    Performance
    (64)
    Story
    (65)

    In the minds of historians and the American public alike, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was one of our greatest presidents, not least because he supposedly saved America from the Great Depression. But as historian Jim Powell reveals in this groundbreaking book, Roosevelt's New Deal policies actually prolonged and exacerbated the economic disaster.

    David says: "Very Important"
    "Scones for the Tea Party"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Going into this book I expected to hear a new scholastic exposition upon the failings of the New Deal. Instead it was a Libertarian set piece on how the entire FDR administration efforts were machinations for re-election and to convert the American economy to Socialism! Every single New Deal policy was part of a malicious and devious plan to strip Americans of their individual liberties through increased taxation and larger government. According to the author capitalist free markets that are unconstrained by any regulation are the only historical economies to produce human progress. Any regulation, be it insurance on deposits, Social Security, or limitations on the sale of swamp property, all impede free markets! The book was written in 2002 and hasn't been updated to explain how FDR caused 2008.

    6 of 13 people found this review helpful
  • The Imperial Cruise: A Secret History of Empire and War

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 5 mins)
    • By James Bradley
    • Narrated By Richard Poe
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (96)
    Performance
    (48)
    Story
    (49)

    In 1905 President Teddy Roosevelt dispatched Secretary of War William Howard Taft on the largest U.S. diplomatic mission in history to Hawaii, Japan, the Philippines, China, and Korea. Roosevelt's glamorous 21 year old daughter Alice served as mistress of the cruise, which included senators and congressmen. On this trip, Taft concluded secret agreements in Roosevelt's name.

    Kent says: "Over the Top - Why did I waste my time?"
    "What Secret? This book?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I truly enjoyed the author's two previous efforts, so wondered how he went so far astray in this history with the basic facts. The entire book is written from a 21st century perspective and attitude, judging a 19th century man's, (Teddy Roosevelt), beliefs and actions. If that weren't bad enough, the author then cherry picked which beliefs and actions to present for his interpretations. All of this justification and rationalization is to support a hypotheses that in 1905, TR gave Taft the go ahead to behind the scenes, to abrogate a commercial treaty with a Korean government that ceased to exist in 1897. The hypotheses following is that Japan then invaded Korea, with TR's approval, thereby starting a domino effect - for both WWII and the Korean War in 1905. (This is the same theory which a minority opposition party in South Korea has espoused for years to prove that the United States can't be trusted if the North invades). That Revelation comes after much proof of how much of a racist and overall butthead TR really was. I'm not saying that the "social evolution" theories that the societies on both sides of the Atlantic took so near to their hearts, nor the proposition of Kipling's "white man's burden", hold a lot of water in the 21st century, but they surely did in the 19th. TR's desegregation of New York state public schools as governor is ignored, having Booker T. Washington to dinner at the White House is omitted, his appointing of African-Americans to Federal positions and the appointment of the the first Jewish Cabinet member are all completely left out of a book that paints the most progressive president in US history as an opportunist bigot.

    The other two leading characters in the book don't come out unclean either. Taft, the then Secretary of War, comes off as simply going through life to make his wife happy. Her dream job is that of First Lady. The other thread is 21 year old, Alice Roosevelt, TR's eldest daughter who accompanied Taft on the "imperial cruise", who comes off as a misunderstood brat. One of the primary reasons for sending Alice was so that all public attention focused on her, as she crossed the Pacific, while her father was hosting the Portsmouth peace negotiations between Japan and Russia, in relative privacy. The fact that Alice and her step-mother didn't get along is a well known fact, but there is much revisionist history here as to 'why' Alice turned out to be such a brat - it was all her parents' fault!

    The narrator did a great job. He took the material and ran with it with great gusto. One of the reasons the book irked me so much was the good presentation of bad material!

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • South Pacific Destroyer: The Battle for the Solomons from Savo Island to Vella Gulf

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 57 mins)
    • By Russell Sydnor Crenshaw
    • Narrated By Alan Bomar Jones
    Overall
    (19)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (16)

    Russell Crenshaw's riveting account of the savage night battle for the Solomon Islands in early 1943 offers listeners a unique insider's perspective from the decks of one of the destroyers that bore the brunt of the struggle.

    Bruce Kent says: "Great History - Hard Listen."
    "Great History - Hard Listen."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a much needed window into the history of US destroyer action in the South Pacific. Other than the stories of "The Little Beavers" of Burke's DesRon 23, and the fate of the tincans of Halsey's 3rd Fleet in Typhoon Cobra, little has been written about American destroyer operations during World War Two with any great specificity. Unfortunately the narrator's ignorance of anything "naval" or any familiarity with Naval history detracts from the subject matter with his repeated mispronunciations of both terminology and proper names. One would think that the editors would ensure that these errors would nor occur. Any fellow member of the US Naval Institute will cringe at these glaring errors. Content is outstanding, but the delivery while enthusiastic, makes this a tedious book to listen to for long periods of time.

    I have found that this naval terminology mispronunciation problem is systemic on audible books due to ignorance and a lack of oversight, but one should expect that they would get proper names such as "Grumman" and "Mitscher" correct!

    10 of 10 people found this review helpful
  • Into the Storm: Destroyermen, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Taylor Anderson
    • Narrated By William Dufris
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2246)
    Performance
    (1454)
    Story
    (1457)

    Pressed into service when World War II breaks out in the Pacific, the USS Walker---a Great-War vintage "four-stacker" destroyer---finds itself in full retreat from pursuit by Japanese battleships. Its captain, Lieutenant Commander Matthew Patrick Reddy, knows that he and his crew are in dire straits. In desperation, he heads Walker into a squall, hoping it will give them cover---and emerges somewhere else.

    AudioAddict says: "The cover is a little misleading"
    "Riveting Read, Numb Narration"
    Overall

    From the very first, the author sucks you right into the most improbable situations and causes your suspension of disbelief,to flow seamlessly. Whether you're a fan of naval action or a sci-fi nut, (or both like me), you can effortlessly forgo reality and take an escape. The author weaves the technology of a US Navy, 1919 WICKES Class destroyer into an entire world, all of his own creation. The sole problem is the failure of the narrator to do his homework to learn how to pronounce simple naval and military terms properly. Someone needs to explain to Mr. Dufris that a B.A.R., (Browning Automatic Rifle), is not a 'public house', and so isn't pronounced, "bar", and that the front of a ship, the fo'c's'le, differs from a "focksall" or a "foxhole". His constant and nerve grating mispronunciations through ALL 3 books ought to have been caught by the producers. These are only 2 examples of everyday terms that are consistently mangled by the narrator to the detriment of an otherwise excellent story. The flow of the story is significantly effected by the narrator's ignorance of things both Naval and military, making it all too obvious that all 3 books were recorded at the same time - and that the producers didn't really care.

    10 of 17 people found this review helpful
  • First Daughter: A Jack McClure Thriller

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Eric Van Lustbader
    • Narrated By Richard Ferrone
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (124)
    Performance
    (31)
    Story
    (33)

    Jack McClure lost his daughter. Now it's his job to make sure the president-elect doesn't lose his. A new administration is on its way in, but the president has a few power moves left to see his legacy solidified. Moderate conservative Edward Carson is taking the reins, hoping to set America on a new course. But weeks before Inauguration Day, Carson's daughter, Alli, goes missing from her college dormitory.

    Steve says: "Not worth the read"
    "Anti-Religious Diatribe in Disguise"
    Overall

    Been reading the author since his "Sunset Warrior" Series of the 1970's and rediscovered him once he continued Ludlum's Bourne Series. Always looked forward to solid plots with nice twists and turns, based on at least semi-believable characters. A genius dyslexic is fine, but one who sees hallucinations to help his investigation to a tad over the top, as is blaming all the world's problems on the Book of Genesis and those who believe in it, literally or proverbially.
    I don't care if the author is gay, or agnostic, or green with purple blotches, I just don't want to be beat about the head and shoulders with any of those for 12 and half hours when I'm listening to a genre as an escape.

    4 of 10 people found this review helpful
  • Halsey's Typhoon

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Bob Drury, Tom Clavin
    • Narrated By Eric Conger
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (86)
    Performance
    (21)
    Story
    (20)

    December 1944, the Pacific Theater. General Douglas MacArthur has vowed to return to the Philippines. He will need the help of Admiral William "Bull" Halsey's Pacific Fleet. But at the height of the invasion, Halsey's ships are blindsided by a typhoon of unprecedented strength and scope. Battleships are tossed like toys, fighter planes are blown off carriers, destroyers are capsized, and hundreds of sailors are swept into the roiling, shark-infested sea.

    M. Taussig says: "Weather and Naval History Masterpiece"
    "Overcome by Circumstances"
    Overall

    Excellent book for those who aren't aware of this little footnote of WWII. Because most people aren't familiar with the US Navy's Third and Fifth Fleets, much space is dedicated to background on how "Bull" Halsey and the Third Fleet came to be in the Philippine Sea on 17 December 1944.
    The book is extremely well researched and tells the story in as impartial manner as possible. I listened to the book straight through in spite of the fact that I was very cognizant of the facts. The book reads like a historical novel. The authors weave essentially 5 story lines together to tell the 2 day saga. The result is a tale of hubris, tractability, heroism, insubordination, fatalism, life and death.
    My only negatives are minor. The narrator mispronounced some nautical equipments, but was consistent in his mispronouncements. The authors also had minor problems with terminology. For example, the only "ceilings" onboard US Navy ships are those made of panels that are suspended by wires, hanging from the "overhead". I only mention these small errors because they stood out in an otherwise outstandingly researched book where the authors went to great pains to use authentic Naval terminology.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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