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'Nathan

Ottawa, Ontario, Canada | Member Since 2004

120
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 27 reviews
  • 137 ratings
  • 443 titles in library
  • 11 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
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FOLLOWERS
41

  • Bear, Otter, and the Kid

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 19 mins)
    • By T. J. Klune
    • Narrated By Sean Crisden
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (170)
    Performance
    (159)
    Story
    (161)

    Three years ago, Bear McKenna’s mother took off for parts unknown with her new boyfriend, leaving Bear to raise his six-year-old brother Tyson, aka the Kid. Somehow they’ve muddled through, but since he’s totally devoted to the Kid, Bear isn’t actually doing much living. With a few exceptions, he’s retreated from the world, and he’s mostly okay with that - until Otter comes home. Otter is Bear’s best friend’s older brother, and as they’ve done for their whole lives, Bear and Otter crash and collide in ways neither expect.

    L. Hew says: "Nothing But the Best!"
    "Engrossing from step one."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I have to say - before anything else - that the narrator, Sean Crisden, absolutely nailed this one. Every character has a voice, and those voices built upon the characterization that T.J. Klune gave them, and brought them even more to life.

    Not that they needed any help. Bear, the Kid, and the cast of characters that surround them (especially Anna and Otter, of course) are so richly designed that they live and breathe for the reader (or, in my case, listener.)

    Without giving anything away, the situation is this: At eighteen, Bear is left with guardianship of his younger brother because his mother takes off with her boyfriend. His entire life narrows down to the realization that he needs to take care of his brother - the wonderfully written Kid from the title, who is barely six or so at the time. That his best friend, his best friend's bother (Otter) and his girlfriend Anna are there to help - not that Bear feels he can trust anyone ever again.

    This is the crux of the story, that Bear can't open himself up to accept help without mallet to the head, and that trust for him does not come easily.

    Also - there's the way he feels about his best friend's older brother - Otter - not that he wants to think about that at all.

    T.J. Klune spins a wonderful story here - it's engaging, it's enraging (seriously, Bear is so incredibly infuriating at times, but in a way that makes you keep going), it's sexy, it's emotionally disarming (the Kid is freaking adorable), and - frankly - it's completely engrossing. I was absolutely hooked on this story from step one.

    I'm definitely finding more T.J. Klune.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Bear Like Me

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs)
    • By Jonathan Cohen
    • Narrated By Wes Smith
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    Fired from his job at Phag magazine, Peter Mallory has to find a way to make a living…and get revenge! When his best friend suggests writing a book about the bear community - and using his new ursine look to go undercover at Phag - Peter is soon letting his body hair grow and practicing the fine art of flannel couture. When Peter's sabotage campaign works only too well, he starts to run the risk of discovery.

    'Nathan says: "Fun, furry, and clever."
    "Fun, furry, and clever."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I'm a fan of audiobooks and finding more and more titles from Lethe/Bear Bones and Bold Strokes has been a real joy to add some quality audiobooks to my two-plus hours of commute every day.

    "Bear Like Me" works on many levels - on the surface, this is a fun and light story of a guy in way over his head: a gay clone twink type who is unjustly fired from his job at a magazine is left twisting in the wind, and his friend convinces him to go undercover into the bear community and write a book about the experience. Hijinks begin from the first confusion over "husbear" and then a second plot wrinkle enters: he has the opportunity to maybe do some sabotage to the magazine that let him go. Juggling identities, lies, sabotage and a romance that is starting with a burly bear makes life complicated, but the biggest struggle might just be realizing that the only thing better than pretending to be a bear might be actually being one.

    On that fun mad-cap level alone, the story works. It's actually mildly a period piece as well, and keeping in mind the tale takes place as the internet age is dawning will also make some of the chuckles all the more amusing - I didn't get his absolute confusion about computers for a moment or two, until I realized that.

    On a deeper level, though, there's more here. On his quest to investigate the bear identity, the hero also bumps into the same struggles I remember all too well from my brief foray into the bear world when I first came out: the community can be the most supportive and wonderful culture, but just like anywhere else, there are some who take the rules as permission to be exclusive and cruel. Being new (and fake), the hero of the tale gets a double-dose of that double-edged reality, and there were more than a few moments that made me want to reach in and strangle a character or two on behalf of my younger self, even as I shook my head in amusement at the antics of all involved.

    "Bear Like Me" ultimately left me smiling, and I can happily recommend it - especially to anyone who didn't fit any of the molds when they first came out.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Love Comes in Darkness

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 25 mins)
    • By Andrew Grey
    • Narrated By Max Lehnen
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (25)
    Performance
    (25)
    Story
    (23)

    Howard Justinian has always had to fight for his freedom. Because he was born blind, everyone is always trying to shelter him, but he's determined to live his life on his own terms. When an argument with his boyfriend over that hard-won self-reliance leaves Howard stranded by the side of the road, assistance arrives in the form of Gordy Jarrett. Gordy is a missionary's son, so helping others is second nature - and he does it in such an unassuming manner that Howard can't say no.

    'Nathan says: "A Light Enjoyable Listen"
    "A Light Enjoyable Listen"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I liked this. I listened to it over a few days on the to-and-fro work trek. The narrator felt a bit off sometimes, which was a minor issue, but to judge the story itself, it was light and sweet.

    When Howard - who is blind - is left abandoned at the side of the road by his boyfriend after a fight, a stranger pulls up and helps him while he waits for the friends he has called to come pick him up. This stranger - Gordy - has an immediate attraction to Howard, and the two of them have a chance to reconnect a short while later. But dating a blind man is a no easy task, Howard knows, and having just come off a relationship with someone very controlling has been hard - Howard values what independence he has managed to create for himself.

    If that had been the sole source of stress in the story - these two men navigating the give-and-take issues made all the more difficult with the inclusion of Howard's blindness, then it would likely have fallen a little short. But Love Comes in Darkness goes further, and throws a massive new event directly into the life of Howard, and shakes everything to the core. Being independent is no longer the primary concern for Howard, and everything else might have to go if he's to do the right thing by those he loves.

    Well told, and I have realized since that this is actually book two, and that some of the supporting characters were the main pair in book one. I'll be adding it to my queue.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Affair of the Porcelain Dog

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Jess Faraday
    • Narrated By Philip Battley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (28)
    Performance
    (25)
    Story
    (25)

    London, 1889. For Ira Adler, former rent-boy and present plaything of crime lord Cain Goddard, stealing back the statue from Goddard's blackmailer should have been a doddle. But inside the statue is evidence that could put Goddard away for a long time under the sodomy laws, and everyone's after it, including Ira's bitter ex, Dr. Timothy Lazarus.

    Susie says: "Sherlock Holmes Meets Oscar Wilde"
    "Brilliant book, Phenomenal audio experience!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I'm a lover of audiobooks. Even if I were able to physically read on the bus - I can't, it makes me feel ill - there's still something so incredibly wonderful about the spoken word, and the experience of listening to a great story being told. Usually, I do this to make the time pass by on the long trek to and from work, or when I'm doing something tedious like the laundry or dishes. For "The Affair of the Porcelain Dog" I was instead scurrying around, trying to find any excuse to be able to keep listening, and even wearing my ear-buds while I did routine stuff all the way to the moment I had to open the doors for the day.

    I listened on my break. I listened on my lunch. I listened in the bath. I even got up early on the day of my closing shift so I'd have the two full hours of time I needed to finish the book before my work shift started.

    In short? Jess Faraday's "The Affair of the Porcelain Dog" was the best audiobook experience I've had in years. There are a few sides to that experience.

    One, the writing was so completely engaging that I was happily drawn into the narrative from step one. The setting - a Holmes-era tale in London at it's most coal-caked and financially stratified, "The Affair of the Porcelain Dog" is also Holmes-esque in its execution, pulling you into a mystery from the opening that is as steeped in the time and place and culture as it is in the richly drawn characters. The main voice, Ira Adler, is such a charming character even when he's being selfish or spoiled that I was smitten instantly. An orphan and former rent-boy, Ira is living in luxury now at the beck and call - and bed - of Cain Goddard, who despite his genteel appearance is in fact a crime lord making most of his living off the legal opium trade. Ira, no slouch in the street arts of lock picking, pick pocketing, and capable of thieving with the best of them, is tasked by Goddard to recover the titular piece of artwork, which is both ugly and apparently contains a secret that could ruin Goddard, and bring Ira's comfortable new life to an end. Of course, in a mystery as tightly drawn as this one, there are far more players than that - including the wonderfully written Timothy Lazarus, a giving clinic doctor who is after the same object d'art for his own friend - and Goddard's rival. That Lazarus and Adler have a romantic entanglement in the past just adds to the joy in their interactions.

    Two, the performance. Oh how Philip Battley narrated the heck out of this book! He took Jess Faraday's amazing story and put such an incredible performance behind his reading. Every accent and every tone just burst with verisimilitude. It kills me that the search on his name over on audible only showed one other audiobook. I sincerely hope there's more from him.

    Third - and last - there weren't compromises in the historical setting including gay characters. I rarely read historical gay fiction because so often the gay stuff sort of slides unnoticed among the rest of the tale. Somehow everyone the characters meet are happy and open-minded folks who understand these guys aren't evil (despite religion, law, and everything about the current culture saying they are). That these men are gay is a huge factor to the story, but not in a way that doesn't ring true.

    Okay. I'm moving past reviewing and into gushing. Just trust me on this one. Read it or listen to it - I'm totally going to suggest you listen to it if you're at all an audiobook lover - and rejoice in the fact that there's a sequel, Turnbull House, on its way.

    9 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • Undead Sublet: A Free Story from 'The Undead in My Bed'

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Molly Harper
    • Narrated By Sophie Eastlake
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1464)
    Performance
    (1294)
    Story
    (1296)

    In "Undead Sublet" by Molly Harper, executive chef Tess Maitland is banned from her five-star kitchen in Chicago to recover from "exhaustion". Choosing a random rental house in Half-Moon Hollow to spend time in, she's unaware that the house comes with a strange man. Even though Sam Masden's ex-wife has rented the house out from under him, the divorce settlement allows him access to it for another ninety days. With Tess unable to go anywhere else, and Sam unwilling, a war of epic proportions is declared - and romantic sparks and heavy pots fly.

    Taryn says: "Completely awful"
    "Fun, light and snappy."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    There are different things to take into account with an audio experience. The reader has to perform - often I find the biggest issue is a reader who can't do different voices and who tries to do so. It's usually fine if a reader can't really give different accents or sounds to particular voices and they don't attempt it - after all, if the author has done their job, the different voices will come through. But if a reader tries and fails to do a good job at different characters, that can ruin the effect.

    This, happily, wasn't at all the case for "Undead Sublet," by Molly Harper.

    I like vampire tales as much as the next person, but what I think Molly Harper did here that was so clever was to take the dark angsty side of the vampire and pretty much completely ignore it in favor of something else: vampire taste buds.

    Let me explain. The set-up for this story is this: executive chef Tess Maitland - who has had a bit of a meltdown due to a jerk of a boss (also her ex), an impossible work schedule, and no sleep - is on "sabbatical." She comes to Half Moon Hollow and rents a house near where her former Chef and mentor lives, hoping to sleep, eat, rest, and get back into fighting shape to return to the city and reclaim her kitchen, restaurant, and status as one of the few women to make it in the wretchedly competitive world of gourmet cooking. There's a slight problem - in the basement of the house she's renting, there's a vampire. And he's the soon-to-be ex-husband of the woman who rented the place to Tess - which means he has a right to be there, too.

    Thus begins a war between the chef and the vampire to see who cam make life (or unlife) the most uncomfortable. Except somewhere during the pranking and the wonderful characters of Half Moon Hollow she meets, Tess starts to realize something: she hasn't felt this good in ages.

    Fun, light, and incredibly funny, "Undead Sublet" is a novella set between books in an ongoing series about Half Moon Hollow. I didn't know that when I listened to it, and while there are some throw-away lines that made me think I was missing a reference to a previous story, this was a fully self-contained tale of its own, and I didn't feel like I'd walked into the book without enough information. That's a big compliment to pay about a book that belongs to a series, as it's hard to pull off.

    Not only was the writing enjoyable, the reader was great - Sophie Eastlake had a real knack for comedic timing, and the story itself made me laugh out loud multiple times (especially during the pranking, and while inside Tess's head whilst she is cursing up a storm). I'll definitely seek out more from both of them.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Brilliance of the Moon: Tales of the Otori, Book Three

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 59 mins)
    • By Lian Hearn
    • Narrated By Kevin Gray, Aiko Nakasone
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2057)
    Performance
    (598)
    Story
    (601)

    In the final installment of the Tales of the Otori, the young Takeo meets his destiny, fulfilling the prophesy: "You were born into the Hidden, but your life...is no longer your own."

    William T. Katz says: "Good trilogy. Book 3 is weakest."
    "Immersive"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Listening to this trilogy has been like immersing myself in a wonderfully developed myth of old Japan. It's fantastic, and if you've never listened to 'Across the Nightingale Floor,' then that is where you need to start.

    In the third volume, things are perched on the precipice. Can Takeo take his destiny into his own hands, and use war to bring peace to the lands? Will Kaede, who has become so much more than a helpless young woman, finally take control and escape the paper and silk prison she has become trapped within?

    The supporting cast, the land itself, and the sheer detail and lovely prose of these stories just dazzle. Definitely a worthwhile listening experience.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Home at the End of the World

    • ABRIDGED (7 hrs and 51 mins)
    • By Michael Cunningham
    • Narrated By Colin Farrell, Dallas Roberts, Blair Brown, and others
    Overall
    (56)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (8)

    Michael Cunningham's celebrated novel is the story of two boyhood friends: Jonathan, lonely, introspective, and unsure of himself; and Bobby, hip, dark, and inarticulate. In New York after college, Bobby moves in with Jonathan and his roommate, Clare, a veteran of the city's erotic wars. Bobby and Clare fall in love, scuttling the plans of Jonathan, who is gay, to father Clare's child.

    Robert says: "I hated for it to end"
    "Left me a little unsatisfied"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I listened to most of this on our way to Orangeville to put my father's ashes into a cubby-thing (tm), and most of the ride back. The fact that the gay character has to decide what to do with his father's ashes was a bit of an ironic twist to the selection, but otherwise, this was what I'd call a character study novel, in that the plot itself doesn't really go anywhere.

    Basically, you follow the lives of four people, Jonathan (the gay fellow), his mother Alison (a New Orleans girl who married a fairly plain fellow in Jon's father), Jonathan's childhood friend and first love, Bobby (who was voice/narrated by Colin Farrel and mrowr! that was a good thing), and his later friend Claire.

    Jonathan, Bobby and Claire form an odd romantic triangle where Jon loves both Bobby and Claire together, Bobby desperately wants a sense of 'family' to replace his tragic family history, and Claire is suddenly feeling older and wants a child. They form a family of their own, a unique one, and really, that's all there is to the plot.

    It's the characters that make the story interesting. Jonathan's inability to stop looking toward some sort of "maybe someday," future; Bobby, who seems the prince of acquiescence; Claire, who is so unusual at first sight, but fears that she might just be a regular selfish mother after all; and Alison, who really only comes alive after the death of her husband. Alison often feels like an afterthought, but the other three characters spiral around each other.

    Cunningham's metaphors are sometimes a bit odd ("cut like an x-ray") and he has a deft touch with the characters and their own points of view - Bobby through Jonathan or Claire's eyes seems such a flat and quietly boring sort, but internally, Bobby is quite the philosopher, for example - and the internal dialogues are very well put together.

    But is it enough? I'm not sure. While I liked it well enough, I'm not sure as a character driven story it had enough to the characters. Nothing felt resolved, the ending was quite sudden and jarring, and Claire's denouement seemed almost forced. The only really likeable fellow is Bobby, and even he tends to be somewhat frustrating in his inability to disagree. It's hard to say, really, if my experience with the book makes me want to try more Cunningham or not.

    I do think that as an audiobook (I downloaded this from audible.com) it went better than if I'd've read it on my own. The lack of plot or sense of forward motion really would have made it a dry read, and listening to the four voices read their characters was much more enjoyable, I think.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Short History of Nearly Everything

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Bill Bryson
    • Narrated By Richard Matthews
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (6274)
    Performance
    (2135)
    Story
    (2143)

    Bill Bryson has been an enormously popular author both for his travel books and for his books on the English language. Now, this beloved comic genius turns his attention to science. Although he doesn't know anything about the subject (at first), he is eager to learn, and takes information that he gets from the world's leading experts and explains it to us in a way that makes it exciting and relevant.

    Corby says: "Very informative, fun to listen to"
    "A wonderful listening and learning experience"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Quite frankly, this was like listening to a long series of "Nature" programmes on the radio, except - amazingly enough - extremely entertaining. It ranged from completely disparate topics such as vulcanology (did you know that Yellowstone Park, all of it, is a huge volcano overdue for a massive blowout?), atoms and molecules (did you know we know there is mass, but not how?), viruses and bacteria (there was once a plague that gave everyone a kind of terminal apathy), and all the way to evolution and back with every sort of stop between.

    If you at all enjoy science and nature shows, then this is a book for you. If you find them remotely boring, or flat, then maybe not. This was certainly some of the most fun I've had with science, but in such a scattershot way as to appeal to my "trivia" nature. If the section on cells had gone on much longer, for example, my iPod would have had a bit of a hard time skipping fast enough for my thumb-pressing.

    It was fascinating (the places life manages to form and prosper), terrifying (we'd really not notice an extinction level impact heading our way until it was pretty much here), horrifying (upon being asked what he felt now that he'd just shot the last bird in an entire species, one fellow said, "joy"), and a little bit overwhelming (the names, dates, titles, and repetitious use of "we don't know"). At times, the various intrigues of the science community were by far more fascinating than what the scientists were studying themselves (who knew that Darwin liked to electrocute himself? Or that a 300 pound man who stayed in the same nursery wing of his estate and the same nursery bed his entire life - and never left home - wiped out species all over Hawaii - a place he never went?)

    Is it "everything"? Well, of course not. But I daresay that my absolute amateur level of most scientific knowledge bases have improved a smidgeon. And really, how can it not be fun to tell children browsing in my store that the old-style diving suit on the cover of the Lemony Snicket book was originally intended to be used fighting fire? If nothing else, you'll get a real sense of just how much life (and I'm using the big-L life here, not just we homo sapiens) is sort of a grand series of really lucky coincidences. And how much we're mucking it up.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Retirement Plan: A Crime Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 26 mins)
    • By Martha Miller
    • Narrated By Bernadette Dunne
    Overall
    (78)
    Performance
    (68)
    Story
    (66)

    What do you do when you fall through the loopholes in the system and all you have to rely on are your own wits? Lois and Sophie have scrambled and saved for years, planning for their retirement in Florida. But now they've lost it all, and Lois' sniper training from her long-ago service as an Army nurse leads to a desperate career choice. When Detective Morgan Holiday is assigned to investigate a spate of sniper killings, it's just one more stress point in her already overburdened life.

    'Nathan says: "Rooting for the "bad guys" has never been so good!"
    "Rooting for the "bad guys" has never been so good!"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    My lord how I adored this. I listened to it to and fro from work. I must say the reader did an amazing job.

    It's not hard to imagine an older lesbian couple reaching their retirement years and struggling for their income. One is a teacher, the other a retired military nurse, and living on social security and non-existent pensions is a struggle. Pretty much the only thing they own that doesn't have a use - they've sold everything else - is a rifle they have kept for sentimental reasons.

    And though they can't quite pin exactly when - or which of them it was exactly - the decision was made, they did indeed make a decision to make some extra money by offering their services in a growth industry: hired assassination.

    These two wonderful old women are a joy to read - even though they're killers for hide (and at times even because of it). That they have a moral compass in play (albeit one that still allows their murder-for-cash solution to life's problems) is central to how they're still so damned loveable, and as the tale progresses, and their backgrounds, histories, loves and pains come to light, my affection for them only grew.

    Counterpointed with these two lovely ladies is another woman, the detective who is assigned to the case when the bodies start to stack up. Her journey was also intriguing, enjoyable, and emotionally encompassing, and the last few chapters, when things start to grow very taut, had me very nervous for all concerned.

    Can you root for the killers?

    In this case, how couldn't I?

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  • The Romanov Prophecy

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Steve Berry
    • Narrated By Paul Michael
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (441)
    Performance
    (172)
    Story
    (168)

    In 1917, Nicholas II, Tsar of Russia, was executed by revolutionaries. Now, in response to the collapse of the country's economy, the people have voted to instate a new Tsar, one who will be chosen from the descendents of Nicholas II. But a powerful group of Western businessmen want to make sure he is a candidate they can control, and hire African-American lawyer Miles Lord, with his knowledge of Russian language and history, to check the background of their chosen man.

    Christopher says: "This was well worth it."
    "Solid Thriller"
    Overall

    The concept for Berry's "Romanov Prophecy" is an interesting one: what if Russia, after years of corruption in its failed attempt at democracy, decided to put its monarchy back in place? Those in power behind the scenes don't want to have anyone but a puppet in place, while the people want the real heir - but given that the reign of Nicholas the Second ended with bloodshed and what might have been an urban legend: did two heirs survive?

    Enter Miles, a black lawyer from Atlanta, who is hired to ensure that the currently chosen heir is legitimate. But when he's nearly killed, Miles starts to realize there's more going on, and is quickly on the run in a country where he sticks out like a sore thumb, trying to stay one step ahead of those trying to kill him, and get to the truth before it's too late.

    Read wonderfully, I listened to this going to and home from work. The pacing is excellent, and the characters are good. In a way, it reminded me of Dan Brown's "Angels and Demons," in that it had a same frenetic pace, and a good historical background.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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