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Kd

CLINTON, MS, United States | Member Since 2009

1703
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 209 reviews
  • 221 ratings
  • 0 titles in library
  • 49 purchased in 2015
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  • Romeo and Judy Anne: Texas One Night Stands

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Joan Reeves
    • Narrated By Christine Padovan
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (56)
    Performance
    (49)
    Story
    (48)

    Good girls just can't win! High school principal Judy Anne Palmer was always a good girl who never did an impulsive, rebellious thing. Ever. And look where it got her! One night in Dallas, she meets a man and decides to indulge in a liberating night of passion - liberating her from the stigma of being the oldest living virgin north of the Rio Grande. After all, she'll never see her one-night Romeo again. Unfortunately, the night doesn't turn out exactly the way she planned, and her one-night Romeo isn't one-night stand material.

    ebookluver says: "Can't work out? This will amp your heart rate!"
    "So-so"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I have nothing really bad to say and nothing really good. Thus, this book was so-so to me. It had romance, which was great. That was really all there was. There was an attempt at having a serious backstory, but it held no significant degree of interest for me. But I appreciate the attempt. There were 2-3 sex scenes that were mildly descriptive with very milk language used. So most of the book was not composed of bed scenes. And the narration was also so-so. The narrator failed utterly at doing a British accent. I hate that she even tried. It sounded horrible and, thus, detracted from the experience of the story for me. When the story ended it was just one other item to mark as done. No residual smile or joy or disappointment--thank goodness--after listening. Just....so-so.

    6 of 15 people found this review helpful
  • Seducing Cinderella

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Gina L. Maxwell
    • Narrated By Holly Fielding
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (182)
    Performance
    (176)
    Story
    (177)

    Mixed martial arts fighter Reid Andrews’s chance to reclaim his title as light-heavyweight champ is shattered when he’s injured only months before the rematch. To make sure he’s healed in time, his trainer sends him to recuperate under a professional’s care - Reid’s best friend’s little sister, all grown up....

    Amazon Customer says: "Narrator needs more experience"
    "Nothing new here"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This love story about Luci (a divorced physical therapist) and Reid (a MMA fighter) in Nevada was a repeat of much of what’s in the contemporary romance book. Almost all of the plot devices were too similar to so many other stories: long-time interests in big brother’s best friend + protective big brother, friend agrees to help other friend become love machine or sex pot, one no longer seeks love but only compatibility, and lil’, good girl and big, bad guy, down to the clichéd tribal tatoos. There were other common devices that I won’t share, since they would give away too much of the story. To add to this, the way the devices were used were also too similar. So, within an hour of listening to this story, I began to get bored and look forward to “getting it over with,” as in, the story ending. If you’re someone who hasn’t listened to enough stories with these devices, then this story might interest you more than it did me. It was all very predictable. There were also several attempts at humor or wittiness. They didn’t work for me.
    And I’m really, really not a fan of guys who end most sentences spoken to women with “sweetheart,” “darling,” or “doll” spoken, not as an individualized endearment, but as a way to downsize or minimalize females. Reid might not have meant it that way, but his constant use of “sweetheart” only at particular times came across that way to me. It’s not like it was used during sex or some romantic scene. Other problems included the reason for Luci and Reid reestablishing their childhood friendship being all-but forgotten during the story. At one point, it seemed crucial to Reid, and then it was barely addressed in the story. Similarly, there wasn’t any attention given to Reid being a MMA fighter beyond referencing as a fact. And Reid’s attraction to Luci came out of nowhere and seemed to have no basis. So his affection for Luci all seemed more about his ego and jealousy, not love.
    The author’s attempt to add depth to Reed fell flat and seemed to require too much effort; it was not believable. Likewise, Luci’s “change” was too fast and too easy, thereby making her come across as fake and that aspect of the storyline as false.

    The narrator fulfilled the minimal level of acting techniques, but with little inflection or passion when it seemed most needed, expected or required. So she sounded bland or bored much of the time. She also had an audible breath sound between the end of a sentence and the start of a new one that was a little bit irritating at times, primarily due to its frequency. And there was some kind of weird growl or something in the background occasionally.

    I liked that Luci was not a va-va-voom girl. And I liked the last 40 minutes, but they were not good enough to make up for the other lost minutes. And there’s an especially cheesy statement at the very end that almost ruins those good 40 minutes. The second best part about the book is that it was mercifully not long and, since it was so shallow, common, and predictable, it didn’t matter when I fast-forwarded during parts of the story. I didn’t miss a thing.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Her True Lord's Claim

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Emily Tilton
    • Narrated By Elliott Daniels
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    When 18-year-old Anne, the countess of Mercester, hears that she must marry Sir Guy de Freche, she hopes for the best. But when Sir Nele, the handsome knight sent to bring her home to marry Guy, warns Anne that her husband-to-be is a cruel man who will birch her before he takes her in any way he pleases, she endeavors to escape.

    Kd says: "Fairytale Sex-laden Historical Romance"
    "Fairytale Sex-laden Historical Romance"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This tale about the love triangle—of sorts—between Anne, Sir Guy, and Sir Nele started out okay but quickly became more about sex, either by doing it or talking about it, than anything else. Too much seemed to center on the sex. In some way, it was understandable because it played a role in describing who all 3 of the main characters were. But, as a result, it made all of them appear to be very shallow characters, when there was a hint of greater depth in Anne and Sir Nele which would’ve been great to explore. As a result, all of the spanking—just basic butt whopping with threats of more-–and the sex became boring eventually. And I generally love plenty of sex in my stories. Also, Sir Nele was really the only semi-likeable character. I appreciated having a guy that was likeable. In the story, it worked well being juxtaposed against the “bad-guy,” Sir Guy, since both engaged in the same sexual act, thus being very similar in some ways, including another important way that won’t be revealed here.

    One negative is that the author’s sentence structure was unnecessarily confusing, though her attempt at being historically accurate in speech is appreciated. I’m assuming that was the reason for the convoluted and overly-complex way of stating things. But it didn’t work for me and was more of a distraction than a benefit. And the narrator did ok, though his deep voice took some getting use to when he performed the female characters.
    Still, overall, the story made sense and held together well, though it felt too much like a fairytale for my liking. It wasn’t that it was all too easy or that everyone was perfect, except for the villain, of course. It was more the way everyone acted at such extremes, the way everyone was portrayed and how everything focused on extremely limited aspects of all of their lives and the world they lived in. It lacked any degree of complexity. I guess that’s encompassed in the significant degree of predictability of the story, which is largely how fairytales are. Sometimes that’s what we like about them. And I didn’t hate this story. I guess I just wanted more and saw how it could’ve been more.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Broken Halo: Fallen Angels Trilogy: Book One

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Zoey Marcel
    • Narrated By William Reid
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    Thousands of years ago in another kingdom, there was a great battle between the forces of good and evil. She stayed behind to serve the king. He followed Lucifer and was cast out of heaven. Distance and loyalties come between the guardian angel and the fallen angel, but there was one thing time couldn’t destroy. Despite the fact that Sonya watches over human souls and Nimbus seeks to ruin them, neither one has ever stopped loving each other. But angels and demons are forbidden to mate.

    Kd says: "Mediocre, ill-fated angel/demon romance"
    "Mediocre, ill-fated angel/demon romance"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    2.5 overall score.

    This story is primarily about temptation and the very human trials endured by Sonia, an unfallen angel and one who watches over a married woman, Hannah and, by the marriage link, her husband, Jude, an unbeliever. At the same time, Sonia battles with Nimbus, her past friend and a current fallen angel/demon who has no soul, who also refers to himself as an incubus. It's all a bit confusing. It’s also a story of an ill-fated romance. Other characters include Kasil, an archangel and Nimbus’ friend, Jude, a soul-devourer/soul-vampire. All of these beings live primarily, or engage with each other, in human form The story has a lot of sex. The sex includes multiple partners and some spanking, though not really in a BDSM way. Sex is a tool in the story. Therefore, it’s not exactly gratuitous. Still I got bored with it after a while, and, generally, I LOOOVE sex in my stories. But the stories has to be better too.

    Another being referenced in the story are black angels. I absolutely hate the author’s concept of this, the black angels, which Nimbus believes is worst than what he is; Sonia disagrees. Black angels are also called Kruzniecks (questionable spelling). They seem to be repentant demons/fallen angels. They live off of vampires. They are half angel and half demon, 50-50 of each. The other part of the story that I didn’t like was Sonia’s consistent naiveté. The whole story, really, is based on it. The narrator was fine and read the sensual or sexual parts of the story really well, which is saying something since there was so much of it.

    To enjoy this story, you need to have an alternate idea of HEA. And the ending is a bit of a cliffhanger, since the story continues. But I won’t be continuing it.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Soul Stealer: Shadows, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Brenda Cothern
    • Narrated By Michael Vasicek
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    Born at the creation of time, the Soul Stealer feeds on the malevolent and immoral auras to survive. She has honed her skills by enticing her meals to lay with her.But by attracting the attention of a soulless life-drinker, her very existence begins to change. But will she allow it?

    Kd says: "Average vampire + other-being romance"
    "Average vampire + other-being romance"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This story between Alec and Kiera is a short supernatural romance, though w e don’t learn what each supernatural being is initially. We learn that Alec is a “life-driinker” or vampire but not what Kiera is, though we know early on what she “does” to survive. They have an unexplainable kinetic connection upon first meeting. Most of the story is about Alec figuring out what Kiera is and them getting together in spite of what she is and her reaction to him knowing. Kiera knows what Alec is immediately upon meeting him in his nightclub. They are both centuries old. It’s a story between 2 mature adults, especially since they have lifetimes (i.e. Alec is about 800 years old) of experience.

    Overall, the story creates interesting supernatural mythology. There are other supernatural being referenced but not explained, including a Bender and a Garoul (if that’s spelled correctly). And Alec, as a vampire, seemed to have some new tricks. For instance, he could “shadow step,” which I never quite understood. They used uncommon—at least to me—slang for taking blood from humans, like “an interview.” Alec’s vampire version was one who didn’t have a soul, could influence humans and had super strength and extra healing ability, which are more common among vampire lore. And they—the various supernatural beings in that community—referred to humans as “norms.”

    The sex scenes are very short but somewhat detailed, though not explicit. It’s hard for me to explain the difference between detail and explicitness, but if you’re an erotica reader, wherein very raw, explicit, earthy descriptions are sometimes provided then you get the difference. There are several sex scenes, since they are an important part of Kiera’s life. But, again, they are nowhere near erotica. Still, they could be a problem for you if you don’t like any detail and prefer sexual matters to be left to the imagination. And there is really no sexually explicit language. The sexual terms were pretty much limited to “groin,” “cock,” “climax,” “core,” “nub,” and, “sopping” and “wet.” There are also 2 voyeurism scenes and a male very briefly grabbing another male’s penis.

    I liked the narrator fine but didn’t like the ding sound on the audio that occurred between chapters, though I get its usefulness in making it clear when there was a switch in position in the story. Sometime this switch was between characters and other times between centuries/timeframe or days.

    Overall, it’s an ok story that holds together well. It just didn’t do anything more for me. It was all a bit too easy. And there is a morality aspect to Kiera’s “need” and Alec’s assistance in it that wasn’t dealt with sufficiently for me.

    It ends abruptly but not with a cliffhanger. There are other stories in this series. I won’t be seeking them out, but this book was ok enough that I might consider another tale by this author. Maybe.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Tangled: The Tangled Series, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs)
    • By Emma Chase
    • Narrated By Sebastian York
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1740)
    Performance
    (1617)
    Story
    (1624)

    Drew Evans is handsome and arrogant, he makes multimillion dollar business deals and seduces New York’s most beautiful women with just a smile. So why has he been shuttered in his apartment for seven days, miserable and depressed? He’ll tell you he has the flu. But we all know that’s not really true. Katherine Brooks is brilliant, beautiful and ambitious. When Kate is hired as the new associate at Drew’s father’s investment banking firm, every aspect of the dashing playboy’s life is thrown into a tailspin.

    CAC says: "Brilliant!!!!"
    "Unlikeable male makes unlikeable story"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This story was not for me primarily because I really didn’t like Drew Evans, the male protagonist in this story. Though I really liked Kate Brooks, the young woman he pursues. Drew was a scummy guy. If you want to meet the guy who says the following about himself, then have at it: “I was the little prince. I could do no wrong. There was nothing I wanted that I couldn’t have. I was the most handsome, the most brilliant. There was no one kinder, no one sweeter than me. I was loved beyond words, doted on and catered to. So if you think I’m arrogant, selfish, spoiled, you’re probably right. But don’t hold it against me. It’s not my fault. I am a product of how I was raised.” Drew also made himself the perfect guy by saying, “Sometimes a guy can’t become a man until he meets the right woman.” Really?! So it’s a developmental process based on something so external as meeting a certain person instead of manhood, male maturity being about becoming self-aware and caring about how you treat others or what kind of guy you want to be. That explains a lot. Yet another thing that’s up to a woman to “fix,” yet another woman’s responsibility. Great. If this is a guy you’re interested in, then this is really, really the book for you.

    And Drew referred to his mom as “that bitch” because she planned family movie night when he was growing up. Similarly, Drew referred to his sister’s childhood best friend who performed fellatio on him when they were young as a “bitch” and his older sister (by 5 years), Alexandria, as “THE bitch.” I should’ve listened to the comment about scummy “guy-talk.” In fact, Drew said, “I’m just being a guy.” So playing the stereotype is an excuse for his immature, sex-laden, crudeness and one-track mind that Drew uses; it's not just a listener’s perspective. In fact, there’s a lot of stereotypical info Drew provides about “how guys are,” as though he’s being helpful and doing females a solid by teaching us about males. If the goal was to make Drew as scummy as possible, so that the listener/reader could then be enthralled by his transformation, then the author achieved one part of the plan. Drew was quite scummy. But by the time he had his comeuppance, I could care less, especially since it was of his own making. If I were a dude, I’d be mad at the picture of all guys Drew puts forth in this tale.

    To add to the great picture of Drew, he frequently engaged in conversations with his penis. I am not a fan of stories with a male’s penis as a character. Here the dialogue centered on talks about his penis as a controlling aspect separate from himself and the like. I also don’t like when the narrator of a story—in this case it’s Drew—talks to the listener/reader as though we can engage in a dialogue. It was more like a movie script. And the analogies, metaphors and similes were sooooo overdone, often starting with, “You know when you…” and “It was like when you…” And some of the metaphors and similes are so poorly done. Like Drew saying, “If the poison in the gas chamber smelled like Kate, every death row inmate would die with a smile on his face.” Seriously?! So it’s the smell that’s the major issue for people being put to death by the state? Geez!

    If I never hear “Christ” or “Christ almighty” as an exclamatory statement ever again in life, it’ll still be too soon after listening to this book. And the coup de gras was the author using the term “hermaphrodite,” which I thought everyone knew not to do now. It was actually always wrong because, scientifically, it was never meant to refer to human species, but folks were given a break in the past. Admittedly, Drew uses it to refer to a room, but it’s in an anthropomorphic way b/c he says that the room got a “sex change” and is “more of a hermaphrodite now.” What was supposed to be another witty remark was offensive and showed great ignorance, at the least, and disregard for others, at the most. And, to top it off, he called the movie, “The Notebook,” “so gay.” And these offensive words were used by Drew, internally, during what’s supposed to be a very heart-felt moment, making himself completely vulnerable and being utterly sincere with Kate. So, for me, it’s a heart that I find incredibly distasteful. The only good part is that these offensive terms were used w/in 30 minutes of this tale ending. I don’t need or even want my characters to be perfect. But I couldn’t find anything redeeming about Drew AT ALL! Nothing!

    I don’t have much to say about the narrator. He was fine as Drew, but his voice was too deep to do female voices well. But, the male voice was the predominant one, so, whatever.

    Finally, though I liked Kate because she was not a fluff female and not completely the cliché picture of beauty, and the sex scenes were plentiful and hot, this book and, as a result, this author, is not for me. Be wary of your taste before you give it a try as well.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Mating Hunt: The O'Faoláin Pack, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (2 hrs and 3 mins)
    • By Lexi Bane
    • Narrated By Allison Cope
    Overall
    (5)
    Performance
    (5)
    Story
    (5)

    Once they had decided to take the plunge, Marcus and Liam O'Faoláin knew what they had to do. The Mating Balls were the place where they could find the woman who would complete them. Too bad they didn't know there were going to have to hunt for her.

    Kd says: "Ok story, Bad narrator"
    "Ok story, Bad narrator"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This short story was long enough for me because the narrator pretty much ruined this mediocre story for me. The narration had a constant muffling sound surrounding the entire production. And the narrator put on an exaggerated accent, a very heavy brogue that combined with the muffling sound to make the whole production hard to understand and significantly suppressed the level of clarity. Too, she spoke a bit too fast and seemed unable or unwilling to show passion or pleasure during the 3 sex scenes. The whole thing was so bad that I almost gave up, but the story was, thankfully, short. So I struggled through it. But I had to work too hard to understand what was said.

    Two of the sex scenes were relatively graphic and descriptive and very sexual m/m encounters, and the last one was m/m/f between the main characters Marcus, Liam, and their mate, or as they put it “their lady,” Katerina. Different from other werewolf mating stories I’ve heard, knotting was a part of the sex act, as well. Marcus was the wealthy (family wealth) alpha from Irish royalty. And Liam was his mate. Their “marriage” was easily accepted within their community, but them finding another mate was also ordained and viewed as the norm. Finding their mate was based solely on scent of one-another and was done at a sort of mating ball. Their mating resulted in a werewolf/werewolf/human (female) mating, which also didn’t seem uncommon or abnormal. I liked that, once the 3 of them found of each other, they courted Katerina before jumping into sex. And she initiated the sex when it happened.

    Two other aspects that detracted from the story for me was when, upon meeting each other, all 3 of them told each other what their college degrees were and then Katerina equated the degrees with being “highly intelligent.” Considering the meaning of intelligence and how it’s measured, that statement was dumb. And them sharing their educational background, even without the intelligent comment, was quite weird and out of step with the rest of the story. Also, first Katerina was described as not “classically beautiful” and then later described as “very beautiful.” I would’ve preferred greater continuity and smarts in this story. It had a very abrupt ending but not really a cliffhanger. It just left it where another story could follow if the author chose. But another story is not necessary to know the outcome of the 3 of them coming together. It was all just very blah and even lower when the narration is included in the assessment.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Hermit

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 29 mins)
    • By Shayne McClendon
    • Narrated By Amy Landon
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    When Dr. Ryan Wallace retreats to the Alaskan wilderness to find peace with his past, the last thing he expects is to stumble across a broken woman barely clinging to life. As he watches her fight her way back from hell, his own problems begin to pale in comparison. When she returns to her world, he finally understands - there are some things you just can't live without.

    Kd says: "Good mature non-easy romance"
    "Good mature non-easy romance"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    In this brief story, Daphney, a 29-year-old married (initially) female artist & Ryan, a 42-yr-old intentionally isolated, male, medical doctor accidentally meet in rural Alaska. The story touches upon rape and torture and other violence, but these aspects are not included for drama factor nor are they gratuitous, overdone or harped upon. They are treated as just part of the story.
    Like those aspects, when Daphney and Ryan eventually get together it’s done in a very considerate way that could make sense to a person. It did to me but might not to someone else. And there was nothing graphic or explicit in the sex but a degree of romance and care. I liked that the story seemed “adult.” Though Daphney was 29, she came across as mature and thoughtful. And the paths that Daphney and Ryan chose for their lives made sense and were not easy. There was a HEA but at a cost. So, overall, the story was good though with low-resonation.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Zuri's Zargonnii Warrior

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 30 mins)
    • By C.L. Scholey
    • Narrated By Cassandra Livingston
    Overall
    (4)
    Performance
    (4)
    Story
    (4)

    Zuri finds herself in the hands of a Zargonnii warrior after she and her shipmates are extracted from a strange world. Hunted by the heinous Tonan and sought after by the deadly Gorgano, Zuri is mortified when she realizes humans, especially female humans, are considered a rare, exotic novelty. She has no intention of being put on display for massive warriors to gawk at. She plans her escape.

    Kd says: "An ok human-alien romance"
    "An ok human-alien romance"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This story of the gathering romance between Kobe, a male alien, and Zuri, a female earth person, takes place out of space after weather-related causes end most of the population on earth. Zuri and 2 male comrades are saved by Kobe and his people, since they are the remaining humans after others in their group are killed on the planet they landed on after escaping destroyed earth. There’s never an indication of date or time in history or the future. And planet names are not given, only names of different alien groups.

    And, unfortunately, there is great monochromatic thinking in the author's perception of all things good vs all things bad in her very limited scope and imagination of the alien habitats and inhabitants. This was the worst aspect of the story. The second worst aspect was that—though the story was good, generally—small things didn’t hold together. These detracted from the story. Like, once Zuri and Kobe are alone on his planet, following a harrowing near-death experience, issues of them finding water, bathing, using the bathroom, and other basic necessities, beyond eating, or not really addressed at all. By the time water is addressed, they have been on the planet 2 or 3 days. During that same time, food is addressed, but not water. Not addressing bathing was strange since issues of Zuri smelling under her arm had been addressed by Kobe earlier while they were aboard Kobe’s spaceship. And, apparently, they never had to relieve themselves or deal with other bodily functions. I don’t mean that the author should've dwelled on these aspects, but those are some of the small things that would significantly contribute to someone’s experience of living off the land and trying to escape an unknown place. The author tried to address different struggles but almost totally ignored some of the basic struggles anyone would have to deal with and be effected by. Another example of the story not holding together was a point in the story when Zuri and Kobe were on land, at Finn’s (I can’t say who that is b/c of spoiler issues) friend’s house and then, all of a sudden, they were aboard a spaceship. I rewind the recording thinking I had missed a part of the story; at one point they were on land at a house and then they were aboard a ship. There was no indication regarding this change, this shift in their physical placement. Similarly, Zuri had a psychic power revealed early in the story. Later, near the end of the story, her power was shown to be much more than was ever hinted at or obvious prior to that point. And the change and increased psychic ability of Zuri was so huge that it appeared to come out of nowhere and be an addition to the story to meet a goal of the author. Therefore it was forced, false, unbelievable, and very contrived. Finally, the last negative is that Zuri’s two male comrades, the only other surviving humans, were basically forgotten until almost the end of the story. She was totally out for herself, and, until the ending of the story, they were barely even mentioned or shown any concern.

    A good thing was just the general story, when you ignore the gaps, that is. And the romance was not forced and seemed organic; it was believable. There were 4 sex scenes. They were not remotely erotic, so I don’t know why this story was listed in the erotic section. It was basic intercourse with 2, I think, acts of brief fellatio. And there was no earthy or erotic language, nor was their great sensuality. The first sex scene was pretty quick and emotionless; the other 3 were a bit more but not by much. So it was nice to see Zuri and Kobe find their HEA. But it was not nice enough for me to seek out this author again.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Fixed on You

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Laurelin Paige
    • Narrated By Carly Robins
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (857)
    Performance
    (790)
    Story
    (796)

    Stalking and restraining orders are a thing of Alayna Wither's past. With her MBA newly in hand, she has her future figured out - move up at the nightclub she works at and stay away from any guy who might trigger her obsessive love disorder. A perfect plan. But what Alayna didn't figure on is Hudson Pierce, the new owner of the nightclub. He's smart, rich, and gorgeous - the kind of guy Alayna knows to stay away from if she wants to keep her past tendencies in check. Except, Hudson's fixed his sights on her.

    LeftyMom says: "Not so Fixed"
    "Attempt to make old “pretend-date” proposal new"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is another story of immediate sexual attraction. It happens between 26-year-old, recent MBA graduate and bartender, Alayna/Lainy. and 29-year-old ultra wealthy business man, Hudson. Hudson is also a consummate manipulator of his female partners, and it is done solely for kicks and giggles. And, of course, Hudson has grey eyes.

    This story might be to your liking if your flavor of love is the quick, lusty, almost-entirely-based-on-great-sex kind. I quickly tired of all of the continuous references to Alayna’s wet vagina and/or her wet panties. I liked the very brief glimpses of Alayna and Hudson connecting at a level beyond their lust. But they were very, very, very few and far between. There is some sexual language, dirty talk, and sexual descriptiveness used in this book, but it didn’t seem too much. But it might be for other listeners.

    This story is another retelling of a woman being propositioned to pretend to be a man’s girlfriend with the benefits to her being financial and sexual. Hudson professes to be a man who can’t love, and Alayna professes to be a woman who loves too much. Hudson has a history of manipulating his romantic partners for kicks, and Alayna has a history of obsessive behaviors focused on her romantic partners. She says she has an obsessive disorder. And some consider Hudson to be sociopathic. So the story is them figuring out whether or not they can “fix” each other, in the characters’ words. Adding to their dysfunction are their families. Alayna’s parents died in a car accident when she was 16. It was caused by her father driving drunk, which left her in the care of an older brother who she doesn’t’ connect with and vice versa. And Hudson has 2 younger siblings, one that’s questionably of the same 2 parents, and parents with a loveless marriage. It’s also a story of unveiling secrets.

    The one plus in this story was the complexity of the characters. Including challenging, identified mental health issues in this story makes an old story [frame, plot] somewhat new or different. There was a bit more depth as a result of Alayna’s struggle to learn the difference between feelings and expectations of love and the associated common behaviors compared to her past obsessive behaviors that were also part of her romantic relationships.

    This story is part of a series. The story doesn’t end in this book, though the ending is not quite a cliff-hanger, thankfully.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • The Undoing of a Libertine: Blackstone Affair Historical Prequel

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Raine Miller
    • Narrated By Joshua Story, Martin Dew, Thaao Penghlis, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (13)
    Performance
    (13)
    Story
    (13)

    A Libertine... Jeremy Greymont certainly qualifies. "Sex rough and women loose" is his credo - one he's always taken very seriously, with no deference whatsoever to the society into which he's been born. He's been perfectly content milling along through life on an existence of courtesans and fine Scotch whisky...that is until his grandfather lets him know he's out of time, and his station in life comes with duties attached. Jeremy must produce an heir - posthaste.

    Kd says: "Over-wrought romance; 2.75"
    "Over-wrought romance; 2.75"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This historical romance was about a 2.75, which is not bad. It’s a good story that makes sense and flows well. But points are deducted because the heroine, Georgina, was constantly simpering, and there was constant concern about hurting her, which made Jeremy always question himself, saying how he wasn’t good enough, etc. In conjunction with that, Georgina found more reasons to cry than any person should. Finally, as much as I love romantic words, especially from a guy, Jeremy’s romantic proclamations to Georgina were faaaaaarrrr too many and waaaaaaayyyyy over the top, while Georgina, in between her crying, said little more than “I love you.” The author tried to make Georgina appear strong in some ways, but it didn’t work for me; it wasn’t believable b/c it was too little too late when compared to how she was portrayed the other 90% of the time.

    The sex scenes were plentiful and romantic, though not gratuitous or, what I would call, explicit. There was detail provided, but explicit or raw language or terms were not present. And the sex was, generally, limited to basic f/m intercourse with a drop of oral sex. But, unfortunately, the sex scenes were a primary point of the overly-wrought acts and words.

    There were several narrators but only 2 primary ones, I think, who performed as Jeremy and Georgina. And that was, mainly, really great. But the female narrator could not do male characters. When she narrated Jeremy’s part, she sounded like Georgina. I struggled to tell them apart. There are many benefits to multiple narrators, most of them enjoyable. But there are some drawbacks to switching among several narrators; all of them can’t do all of the characters well. So, in this case, it can be hard to jump from one person performing the heroine to another narrator performing her.

    Finally, I think that the book was a bit drawn out. On the good side is that listeners definitely know the conclusion of everything, pretty much. And the story flows well, not being too much of a love-at-first-sight type of story. Still, though this is my first book by this author, it’s also my last.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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