You no longer follow Kd

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Kd

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Kd

CLINTON, MS, United States | Member Since 2009

1664
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 199 reviews
  • 211 ratings
  • 0 titles in library
  • 22 purchased in 2015
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
513

  • What Binds Us

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Larry Benjamin
    • Narrated By Richard Magnus
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (84)
    Performance
    (79)
    Story
    (80)

    Thomas Edward is only a teenager when he escapes his working class neighborhood. He's ready for anything—except the arrival of Donovan Whyte in his life. Sophisticated and dazzlingly handsome, Dondi quickly becomes the center of Thomas Edward's universe, introducing him to a world full of drama, passion and feuding families.

    Kd says: "Worth the Lost Sleep"
    "Worth the Lost Sleep"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is easily the best book I've listened to in a very, very long time. I'm very into erotica and romance. This was not purely romance and definitely not erotica. But it was about love, both romantic and familial and primarily centered around males. I'm a female, but I absolutely, unquestionably loved it. The story was great. But beyond that, it's the language, the terminology used by the author. He has a finesse for stating things in such beautiful ways that every word resonated with me deeply. It's not a feel good book, but still, through my tears, I was both happy and sad. It was moving in both positive and sad ways, which few books manage to accomplish. I could go on, but I think you get the message. I don't think I've ever given any book 5 stars across the board. But I couldn't identify anything negative about my experience with this book. I'm writing this shortly after I finished the book, so my rating may be based on my continual afterglow. Whatever the cause, this book is worth a listen.

    21 of 22 people found this review helpful
  • Humbled

    • UNABRIDGED (4 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Renee Rose
    • Narrated By Faith Alowyn Alden
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    Sentenced to die at age 11 for stealing a pig, Jean-Claude receives an unexpected reprieve when a young aristocrat girl takes the blame instead. When the mobs of the French Revolution fall upon her château years later, Jean-Claude knows he must save her and repay his debt, but as they begin their long flight to safety he makes it clear he is not her servant and he will deal firmly with any disobedience.

    Kd says: "Romantic & Sexy"
    "Romantic & Sexy"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The story was more like a very good 3.75. I struggled to listen to this story due to a slight but obvious sort of hollow sound in the background. The narration sounded like it occurred in a cave or something. The narration was very good, but the background hollow sound detracted from the overall experience a bit. Eventually, with the good narration and romantic and sexy telling, the hollow sound became less distracting. There was nothing GREAT about this book, but it is very good in a simplistic way. The coming together of Jean-Claude and Corinne was not easy, but there was also no manufactured happenings to make things harder. It all made sense and was predictable—as romances often are—since since you know there is likely to be a HEA. But it was not predictable in a boring way. Instead, it was quite enjoyable to see HOW they arrive at their HEA. The story is sexy, with intercourse and oral sex and some spankings, but there was nothing extreme or actually explicit, in description or language. There was more focus on sensuality without explicitness, since there was a successful attempt to make it all romantic. And it was. Finally, Jean-Claude and Corinne were likeable characters, so it was fun watching them find love.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Hunted: An Erotic Retelling of Beauty and the Beast: An Adult Fairy Tale Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 23 mins)
    • By Cerys du Lys
    • Narrated By Yael Maritz
    Overall
    (6)
    Performance
    (6)
    Story
    (6)

    Hidden in the woods sits a mansion. Rumors say it's commanded by a beast-cursed man who crossed a witch nearly a century ago. Danya has no time for rumors and fantasies, though. Abandoned by her mother at an early age, now trapped by her father's constant debt, she struggles just to care for her family. She's shamed herself, sold her body, all to make some coin and ward the debtors away for a little while longer.

    Kd says: "Feeble adult make-believe redo"
    "Feeble adult make-believe redo"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This story is more like a 2.5. I liked that the story was, essentially, about 2 sisters, Danya (the oldest) and Alana (age 18), who were 2 of 3 sisters. Felice was age 16. All of them lived with their father; their mother left years ago. And the story was also about a cursed beast-man, Everett. So the listener sees all of them change. The side characters, Beatrice, the immortal witch who cursed Everett, Everett’s brother, Dante, Horatio, the butler/the timekeeper. Matilda (Mattie), the arch witch. Unfortunately, however, Danya and Alana were only ok characters, because they, irritatingly, had no sense of personal responsibility. But, alas, this is a fairy tale.

    In listening to this story, I had to constantly remind myself that it was a fairy tale. The reminder was done in order to leave behind some expectations that normally accompany listening to other fictional stories & in order to try to enjoy this tale. Even then, I struggled to get into it, since I generally like more depth, realism, & continuity in the books I enjoy. For instance, Danya was poor but had expensive undergarments. And the story is supposed to occur sometime in the past, but the language didn’t follow that. Still it’s nowhere near the worst book I have listened to, so there is that.

    And I say this even though the narrator also left a bit to be desired. She was horrible as Everett, the beast. And all of the females sounded alike. The males didn’t sound much different from the females either. As Everett, the narrator sounded like a mild-mannered, timid, young guy, when he was supposed to be the great, cursed, male beast. The narrator also often came across as nonchalant when that attitude didn’t work with what was going on.

    The fairy-tale type language was irritating at times but, possibly, in line with fairy-tales, I guess. This story is not for anyone who tires of sexual encounters; this book is chock full of them. And there are some different types, but they were relatively short and not so common as to really affect the story. For instance, the sisters, separately, had sex with magical, inanimate objects and a plant (i.e. a mannequin and a rolling pin and cloth) along with the sex they had with males, including a killing angel. All of the encounters were consensual and heterosexual, so to speak, in reference to sex with the inanimate objects. And all of the sexual encounters were, essentially intercourse, with a bit of fellatio and even less cunnilingus.

    Fortunately, the book improved a bit as it went along and as the action picked up and moved away from a focus on the sexual encounters. Sex was still at the center of everything, in some way, but less explicitly as the story neared the end, about 2 hours until the close of the story. Then the focus became more on talk about sex and less doing of sex.

    The pursuit to grow and change differs among the main characters. And all of them do it in a way that’s relatable. Everett pursues humanity in more than one way, love and acceptance and relationship maturity primarily. And Danya and Alana seek love and romance through sex. Danya also uses sex to keep her family afloat, which is also not farfetched. Though her father owned a shop, she was really the family of four’s breadwinner. So it’s the small degree of complexity surrounding the characters in this adult fairytale that make it bearable. I can’t actually call it good, but I can’t call it bad either.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Carnal Compromise

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Robin L. Rotham
    • Narrated By CJ Bloom
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (3)

    Joe Remke has just one qualification for his lovers: he wants them gone before sunrise, which makes his new bunkmate, AJ, about as safe as a woman can be around him. It also makes his determination to sleep with his boss downright stupid because if Brent ever gives in, he'll be looking for a new job.

    Kd says: "Mature Erotica - Luv, luv"
    "Mature Erotica - Luv, luv"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I have a new author to add to my very brief favorite author list. It was quite enjoyable to listen to this book because it focused on 3 middle-age (mid 30s to around age 50) characters (Joe, A.J./Ariel Jane, Brent) with various life experiences, good and bad. They were traveling farm workers; Brent was a boss farm worker. And the story shared the view of all 3. The story is about all 3 of them getting together, of course. So there was plenty of sex and many uses of the word “c*nt.” So if you have a problem with that, this is so not the book for you. Though this is erotica, I think the explicitness of the sex scenes were somewhere in the mid-range. I’ve heard much rawer (if that’s a word), much more detailed sex scenes. As such, the author did a good job of providing a story with the sex. It’s not a sex-focused or sex-only story. That’s part of what made this a more mature erotica story along with focusing on more mature people & their experiences. Yes, they want to have sex and seek opportunities to do that, but there are more thoughtful reasons for this, which are elucidated. And all of this was told well. Though the story wasn’t new, exactly, it’s telling didn’t seem old-hat or repetitive. There was also no inventiveness in the sex, but the journey to their sexual encounters was a different and more thoughtful journey and struggle, to some degree. The sex scenes include m/m and m/m/f. And details were not circumscribed for those who might be uncomfortable with this form of sex and love. I hope that more books by this author will become available on Audible.

    The narrator did a good job, though there was little difference in the male voices. Still, it didn’t detract from the storytelling at all.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Reaper's Legacy: Reaper's MC, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Joanna Wylde
    • Narrated By Tatiana Sokolov, Todd Haberkorn
    Overall
    (813)
    Performance
    (755)
    Story
    (760)

    Eight years ago, Sophie gave her heart - and her virginity - to Zach Barrett on a night that couldn't have been less romantic or more embarrassing. Zach's stepbrother, a steely-muscled, tattooed biker named Ruger, caught them in the act, getting a peep show of Sophie he's never forgotten. She may have lost her dignity that fateful night, but Sophie also gained something precious - her son Noah. Unfortunately, Zach's a deadbeat dad, leaving Ruger as Noah's only male role model. When he discovers Sophie and his nephew living in near poverty, Ruger takes matters into his own hands.

    Barb says: "Another hot biker!"
    "Ho-hum"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    As a whole, I think this story is just not for me. I have quickly grown overly-tired with stories that overuse the words “hot,” “kickass” and “totally” by the primary characters. Stories where these words are primary terms in the characters’ vocabulary are not for me. It all comes across as immature and very superficial. It didn’t take any time for me to get tired of hearing “Got me” and every other word being “f*ck,” a word I have no problem with, generally. But it was soooooo overdone in this book, continuously used as proof of biker mentality and behavior. I didn’t buy it; it came across more as a caricature of a biker and inauthentic.

    The main characters are Sophie, Noah, Ruger/Jesse Gray, a member of the Reaper biker club & brother of Sophie’s son’s ineffectual & uninvolved dad, Zach. The story is primarily about Sophie, and, as a result about Sophie and Ruger fighting their lust for each other. There’s stuff about biker club problems with the Devil’s Jack biker group too. Unfortunately, Ruger’s attitude towards Sophie, his wanting her sexually ONLY while also not “permitting” her to be with anyone else, has been done and done again. So that was tiresome too. More overdone aspects included Ruger being characterized as the stereotypical white, male biker with the piercings, the violence, the language (e.g. “brother,” “got me,” “f*ck,” “sh*t”), including plenty of sexist language and attitude, &, of course, constant sleeping-around. And, as is common in these types of stories, there was an excessive amount of attention to Ruger’s and Sophie’s bodies/physical attributes and little else. The one exception, gratefully, was a bit of attention given to raising Noah. The book has many yucky characters and perhaps only two likeable characters, Sophie and M. There were cutesy occurrences between the women that’s supposed to be cute and/or funny but just weren’t to me. One example is when one of the women married another biker and pinned his “brand” from her leather vest onto the butt of her traditional white wedding gown. Initially, she was going to wear the vest with the gown. Sophie and Ruger also struggled with having different social expectation views, which resulted in Sophie having some problems with the biker lifestyle and environment. There were other events in this story that were far too reminiscent of other biker stories, potentially by the same author, but I can’t recall. I also listened to Reaper’s Property, which I liked better than this one. This one ends my interest in Joanna Wylde’s books. Sophie and Ruger bounced back and forth between “let’s do it” and “let’s not do it.” With the great amount of mutual lust, I appreciated the strength Sophie showed in not going “all the way” with Ruger, initially. She didn’t b/c she knew it wouldn’t go anywhere (as Ruger quickly and easily admitted) and would change her relationship with Ruger and, as a result, possibly the care of Noah.

    One positive is that there were 2 narrators. But, as is common, both narrators played both Sophie and Ruger, so there was not just one voice for each. It wasn’t too bad b/c both narrators are good. And it seemed like the female narrator played a larger part than the male narrator.

    It took me multiple times to listen to this book. I bought it on 11/27/14, starting listening to it soon after purchasing it, and had to start over a few times b/c I just couldn’t get into it. I never made it passed the first 2 section. I Gave up and then started listening again around 2/4/15. I was just happy when it was over. It felt more like listening just to get it over with, not for enjoyment. Though the book got a little bit better once the focus of the story was no longer on the lust between Sophie and Ruger. It felt a bit more serious as a result of some of the events that happened to Sophie, and her reaction, her resulting struggle felt authentic and not all about the lust. Though Sophie’s love for Ruger, it’s development, was always hard to buy. Beyond him being sexy and always being willing to help her, it was hard to know why or when she would’ve fallen in love with him b/c there seemed to be a lot more negatives to Ruger than positives. There were a few snide comments that were a little funny, which helped make this story more bearable. But those moments were very few. And the epilogue was good. Still, overall, I’m just happy it’s over.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Daddy's Little Girl

    • UNABRIDGED (30 mins)
    • By Jody Darling
    • Narrated By Sierra Kline
    Overall
    (3)
    Performance
    (3)
    Story
    (2)

    Twenty-one-year-old Kerry needs somewhere to live. Her stepfather Brad, whom she hasn't seen since she was five, offers her a place to stay. He's stunned when he realizes that this sexy, curvaceous woman is his little girl, all grown up.

    Kd says: "Good, small, tasty nibble"
    "Good, small, tasty nibble"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    For a very brief story, this author did a great job with exquisite, sexual and sensual detail. And the story is set up well to move directly into the sexual aspect, which is the point of this kind of brief erotica. It’s been 16 years since Kerry and Brad lived together while Brad was married to Kerry’s mom. In this story, Kerry is still in school, so that makes her seem a bit younger than the 21-years-old described in the Audible description. Their attraction to each other is mutually and immediate. But, appropriately, Brad struggles with his attraction to Kerry. Once they began to act on their lust, they both play an active role. So there is not a one-sided seduction. There is very little “daddy” language, once indirectly and once directly. And Brad refers to her as his baby girl & sweet girl once or twice. It’s just sex, which included separate acts of masturbation prior to the intercourse commencing. You don’t hear anything about their future or the outcome of their unprotected sex, though “breeding,” as Brad calls it, is spoken of. The only sex scene occurs on the kitchen floor, so romance is not the goal. If it were longer, I would probably give it a higher score. But it ends just when it gets going, really. And you don’t know the outcome of anything. Still, it's a good, small, tasty nibble

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Going Deep

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Roz Lee
    • Narrated By Abigail Cooper
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (30)
    Performance
    (28)
    Story
    (28)

    Keeping Carrie blindfolded and in the dark as to his identity suits Major League catcher Jason Holder just fine while he figures out if being a Dom really is his thing. With the media circling like vultures as he works to get his career back on track, the last thing he needs is a sex scandal if things don't work out. Just when he's got it all under control a new kind of scandal from an unexpected source threatens everything, and Jason soon finds out that what you don't know can hurt you.

    Kd says: "bad FSG knock off; bad narrator"
    "bad FSG knock off; bad narrator"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The story is about Jason Holder, an older professional baseball player, coming to terms with his sexual preference to dominate a woman and learning what he likes and the how-tos of that scene. His lessons began by way of his friend, Todd, introducing him to a local sex club, The Dungeon, where Jason could practice and learn about "the lifestyle." Todd connects Jason with a friend of his sub named Carrie. Carrie is a journalist focusing on a story of steroid usage in sports. She is inexperienced in BDSM too, having had 2 past sex partners and having acted as a sub only once when she joined her friend and her friend’s dom, Todd. So both Jason and Carrie were novices to “the lifestyle.”

    To keep things between them limited to their dom-sub relationship after hours, all of Jason's and Carrie's first encounters occurred at The Dungeon sex club. And to keep his anonymity, Jason insisted that their first encounters occur with Carrie blindfolded. No preliminary checks for diseases occurred before they started to have sex without a condom. This was especially strange when the author then began to have Jason use a condom near the end of the story. So the author was not consistent in her portrayals. Their sub-dom relationship was uninteresting since the sex was boring to me. Jason seemed to use any excuse to “punish” her. Though, he was also attentive and caring in some ways. But since this was a bad story with a bad narrator, it didn’t matter b/c the bad outweighed any small amount of good in the story and narration. Though the story was a FSG (Fifty Shades of Grey) copy-cat, it had some different parts. One is how they made their way to actual intercourse. Another is how he wrote on her with a marker to literally “mark” her as his and some foot play. But it didn’t matter b/c I don’t know if I’ve ever been sooooo bored by sex scenes in a story. For me, that’s saying something because I have listened to a lot of romance and erotica. But, with this story, I quickly began to fast forward through the vast majority of sex action in this story, and it was a lot.

    When not having sex, the parts of their lives shown outside of “The Dungeon” were very limited and always apart from each other. So, for Jason, listeners heard about him playing baseball and, occasionally, talking to his brother and his brother’s wife, a woman both of them used to have sex with together. His brother was a baseball player too. And for Carrie, we heard about her working on her steroid story.

    This story fell into the common trap of love or something like it being said to be present way too soon. Lust and attraction, even very strong lust, makes sense in this story. But in this story, after engaging in only sexual acts—not always intercourse—4 times, both Jason and Carrie began to contemplate how much they cared about each other and how much they felt cared for by the other. By that time, they didn’t even know each other’s names or who each person was outside of The Dungeon. Neither had they been together in any way but sexually or even talked about anything outside of sex. In other words, they, in no way, even remotely knew each other.

    This story focused more on Jason, so the way the author chose to describe Jason’s vulnerability near the end of the book was disconcerting. It was so different from how Jason was shown to be prior to that point that it didn’t make any sense. The change and supposed revelation had no real basis. That seemed to be a major struggle in the book, the author’s inability to have information flow in an order that makes sense. At different points in the story, info would be dropped and the timing of it would seem strange and would’ve been better placed after or before something else already revealed.

    The story was very mediocre, but the narrator was horrible. She ruined this already mediocre story. The narrator said everything so matter-of-factly that it didn’t work well for the many sex scenes and the great amount of sex talk. It all came across as bland. But worst of all is that the narrator sounded like Marcie, from Charlie Brown, the character who says “sir” at the end of every sentence. Her narration, especially of Carrie, since she always saying “sir,” took this mediocre story to the crap pile.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Thief of Souls

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Cynthia Wicklund
    • Narrated By Veronica Giguere
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (6)
    Performance
    (6)
    Story
    (6)

    Nicholas Anthony's spirit has been corrupted. A moment of spite four hundred years in the past turned him into an immortal monster. Now he is obsessed by an unnatural hunger, feasting on the good in others while seeking the good in himself. But unlike the vampire of myth, it's not the taste of blood that draws him, but the very essence of his victims. The soul.

    Patricia says: "Romance with a hard edge"
    "2.5; unmemorable; unromantic"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This paranormal, barely-romantic tale is the story about wealthy soul-stealer, Nick, and, physician, Regina/Reggie. In large part, it’s about Nick’s internal struggle and Regina’s struggle as a result of his internal struggle, since she ends up being critical to that struggle. The story was so mediocre, passionless and ho-hum that it’s hard to put a finger on what is wrong with it. It has no foul language and has 3 or 4 neutered sex scenes, though I hesitate to even call them that. I think the idea was good but just poorly executed. It was .5 level above boring. Still, I give the author credit for not being obvious in which of the 2 choices would be the ending. And the narrator didn’t help. Her voice of Regina was bad because it was too close to a little girl’s voice.

    Overall, it was just like the meal you get to give it a try for the first time, and realize, after the first bite, that it’s not good and it’s not bad. You can finish it and do, but do so by giving some to your dog and feeling relief when it’s done because you didn’t throw away food. The taste is not so bad that you can’t finish it or need something to wash the flavor away in your mouth, but you are very clear that you will never get it again.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Redemption: The Penton Legacy, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Susannah Sandlin
    • Narrated By Angela Dawe
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (525)
    Performance
    (478)
    Story
    (485)

    For vampire Aidan Murphy, life has never been so desperate. The vaccine used to treat a global pandemic has rendered human blood deadly to his kind, leaving them on the brink of starvation and civil war. In tiny Penton, Alabama, Aidan establishes a peaceful community of vampires and unvaccinated human donors. He dares to hope they can survive - until his estranged brother descends upon Penton and begins killing the humans. Determined to save his town, Aidan kidnaps an unsuspecting human.

    Robbie says: "Out of Nowhere..."
    "Very Average"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This story hit all the points of a fine story but nothing more. Overwhelmingly, it was just uninspiring and without any degree of intensity. The author tried to create angst and included aspects that would normally deliver on some intensity, but for some reason, they didn't add any bang to this story.

    This was a good paranormal, vampire story essentially about Aidan (a vampire) and Krys/Krystal (a human medical doctor) getting together as mates. But it was a bit mild, too straitlaced for my taste. There was no rough language (Aidan said s*it & hell once), very little gore or explicitness in the action, the fights, the blood feeding, and the narrator was as ho-hum as the story. I’m not sure which contributed to the blandness more—the story or the narrator. I think it was, primarily, a bad combination of the two. Some stories would work with this degree of sterility, but a story of battling vampires isn’t one of them. A vampire who enjoys draining humans and is more than willing to kill his brother would not likely be one who used pristine language. Over the 8+ hours of the story, there were two sex scenes that included some detail but only enough for you to know that sex was occurring and for you to get the gist of what was going on. I think the goal was more romance than eroticism or sensuality, and to some listeners that goal might have been attained. But it was too little to me. The passion revealed was a 4 on a 1-10 scale.

    The author did a god job of showing the relationship’s progression, even though there was immediate attraction between Aidan and Krys. And they didn’t jump to talking about love, though it was muttered w/in a month. And the characters were ok, but Krys did two dumb things near the end of the story, about 2 hours until the end, that detracted from the story and her character as a smart and strong woman. They were manufactured dramatic moments that weakened the story. And Krys accepted knowledge of vampires a bit too easily or quickly. She had questions and was curious, and there was a bit of a struggle but very little. And there was little struggle in coming to terms with her feelings for a vampire too. The author also didn't have everything in the story turn out well for everyone in the town, which added some realism to the story. That was good. But the drawn out fight between Aidan and Owen, which was a 2nd major theme in the story, didn't quite make sense. It could've been over with at their first encounter. The author tried to explain this, but the justification was a weak one and continued to weaken as their battle lengthened.

    The narrator did not do the voices as described. For instance, Owen, Aidan’s brother & enemy, was described as being about 2 months out of Dublin, Ireland. Yet, there was no obvious Irish brogue in the narrator’s depiction of Owen. And all of the males essentially sounded the same. It was impossible to distinguish among them. This was also true for the females.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Frayed: Connections Series, Book 4

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 38 mins)
    • By Kim Karr
    • Narrated By Veronica Meunch, Christian Fox
    Overall
    (40)
    Performance
    (38)
    Story
    (38)

    After losing his fiancée, Ben Covington is unsure he'll ever love again. But he's so deeply drawn to Bell Wilde that he's thrown for a loop. Maybe it's purely sexual chemistry that's igniting their spark...or maybe it's his second chance at love. Bell Wilde has just gotten her life back on track and may not be up to the challenge of Ben Covington coming back into it. However, once the spark is reignited...there's no stopping it. But even if they both manage to pull together their frayed hearts, a secret from Bell's past just might shatter them both.

    Kd says: "juvenile; poorly addressed adult themes; sex"
    "juvenile; poorly addressed adult themes; sex"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    My first impression is about feeling duped albeit unintentionally. I didn’t enjoy the female narrator and likely wouldn’t have purchased the story if her part had been in the book sample I listened to. So having the story swing between the two narrators didn’t work for me, since I didn’t experience them in the same way. Similarly, I didn’t like the split focus on both Ben and Bell, simultaneously having both characters tell their side of the same story. The author did a poor job of making it clear when the characters were in the past or in the present. I don’t always dislike this type of storytelling, but here, it didn’t work for me. And I think it was due to the female narrator. I just didn’t like her for this story. And it might have been largely due to me thinking I was getting one story, focused on one character, and getting something else.

    The story is told from the first time they met, which was during college as undergraduates. I generally avoid stories about college-age characters, and Belle acted as an immature college-age female the entire story. Even when it focused on the present, it was confusing. It seemed like Belle’s life was that of someone fresh out of college & quite young. While Ben’s life, the way he behaved and spoke, made him seem older, the age he was supposed to be, somewhere in his later 20s. Another reason I thought this story was one of older people was because the book description referred to Ben dealing with his fiance’s leaving. I was very disappointed to hear a story where that was not quite the case, Belle and Ben, especially Belle did not act older, not even as mature people in their late 20s. Matt was a much more interesting, complex and mature character than Belle. She just messed this story up for me in every way.

    Clearly, I didn’t like Belle. I may have liked the book better if the book only focused on Ben, as I initially thought it would. In the story, Belle said she was a “young, immature woman” when she first met Ben in college and has since “grown up.” I wish that mature, now grown up woman was present in this story, but she wasn’t. The Belle in this story was still the “young, immature woman" unfortunately. I quickly tired of everything being described as “amazing” by Belle and other females in the story. It was yet another indication of the adolescent flavor of this story. Then, when Belle tried to say something other than “amazing,” she failed again with a phrase like “utterly beautiful,” which is also a juvenile syntax error. She added “utter perfection” and “utter good looks”—in one sentence—to the riveting juvenile phrases. And, to describe Ben’s expensive, uniquely-designed house that juts out over the ocean, she described it to him as “super nice.” I thought that showed more immaturity coming from a woman in her 20s that had experienced some difficulty in her life and, supposedly, grew from it.

    Belle and Ben’s relationship was also uninteresting. The author’s attempt at creating unique or hot sex scenes, like a college student-professor role play, was boring and poorly done. And the reason for them trying to avoid each other was so weak. So the rest of the story, watching their struggle to avoid each other romantically, was not entertaining. And the relationship between Belle and Ben was too over the top. EVERYTHING, and I mean EVERYTHING, Ben did turned on Belle and vice versa. It was like listening to a story about adolescents and their first crush. Practically everything was about their physical attributes, as well, and how it impacted each of them physically, sexually, in turn. It was just all too juvenile for me. And the great reveal didn’t add much to me. For some reason, that is unclear to me, Belle’s secret was not surprising once she revealed it to Ben. It may have been because it happened about half way through the 11+ hour story; I’m not sure. And, unfortunately, it did very little to rejuvenate any interest in this story. In fact, the incident reinforced Belle’s degree of adolescence. And the author did a poor job of seriously handling or addressing the various issues surrounding the secret. Though its handling was very in line with the way immature Belle lived life, so maybe there should be some credit given for consistency in the story, even if the aspects that were consistent were irritating.

    After battling through more than 3 hours of the story, I literally cringed when I checked how much longer I had to endure this story and saw that it was more than 8 hours. I paid for it, so I was determined to make it through it. It was like taking bad medicine; I had to schedule taking in the parsed pieces to make listening to it more bearable. I constantly hoped that it would get better. It didn’t. So I started fast forwarding within the 6 hour range. I no longer cared about the intricacies of the story just the gist of it. Then, like the secret revealed halfway through the story, I also guessed rightly that what happened in the end was going to happen. So I was just happy when it was over.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Playing It Safe

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Barbie Bohrman
    • Narrated By Kate Rudd
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (38)
    Performance
    (35)
    Story
    (36)

    Julia Boyd has dated more than her share of jerks, and she’s done even pretending to like them. Putting her dating life on hold and focusing on her event planning career is a much safer bet for the blue-eyed blonde…until she meets her newest client. Organizing the opening for an art gallery should be a breeze for Julia, but gallery owner Alex Holt is becoming very distracting. Tall and muscular, with enough charisma and sexy dimples to make Julia swoon, Alex could be the perfect man.

    Kd says: "good story idea, poorly executed"
    "good story idea, poorly executed"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This story is fully in the chick-lit category, a category that I think I should avoid in the future. So my critique may be different from yours if chick-lit is your thing. This is a romance between two people in their 30s. Alex is 33 and the owner of an art gallery. Julia is in her 30s too, though I’m unsure if her specific age is revealed. And she owns a party planning business that was passed down to her from her dad. Dialogue in the story is constantly between Julia and other people, like her best friend, Sabrina, and Alex, her love interest, and between Julia and herself, and from Julia to us, the unknown listener/reader, with most of it being the latter, unfortunately, so it seemed.

    In many ways, this may be a fun story. Julia is a bit quirky, strong and has a potty mouth. I have no problem with the down-home, real life, unpretentious language she uses for everything, absolutely everything…except female body parts. More on that later. Julia is not a woman who uses “darn” EVER and rarely even damn. Though, I think more balance is needed there. As a professional woman from a higher economic bracket, I think it’s more plausible that she would alter her language more often than she did. So her curse word usage was a bit overdone. It didn’t bother me, it just became too much of a caricature. Some people might find the back-and-forth between her married parents funny or cute, as well, but it didn’t do much for me. Other parts of the story listeners might find fun is her commonly referencing pop culture, like a certain advertisement or male actors who look like people she knows, the back-and-forth banter between her long-married parents, her and her co-workers, and her and her younger brother, along with other aspects of her language. But they were not positive stand-outs to me.

    On these points, Julia should have refrained from so many uses of phrasings originating from urban culture and now appropriated into pop culture (“get digits,” “up in my grill,” “hell to the no”). For women like this one, with her particular multiple cultural identities, her use of these seemed to be an attempt to appear “cool” or hip but which actually weakened her character instead and, again, made her more of a caricature. Similarly, Julia’s inability to have the same degree of earthiness in talking about the female sexual parts as she does when talking about sex, male sex parts and everything else was so contradictory that and inconsistent that it greatly weakened the story and the character. It reeked of a double standard or falseness in the portrayal of Julia, again, more of a caricature. She referred to the female sex parts, with the exception of the c*it (short for clitoris) at rare points, as her “happy place,” “lady parts,” “piece of flesh,” “between your legs,” “down south,” “my entrance,” “inside me” and, about twice, a vagina. But she easily used the f-word when referring to sex and referred to Alex’s sex parts with the same explicitness she used everywhere else (i.e. c*ck & d*ck). I get another reviewer’s critique of too many references to different aspects of pop culture, especially TV & movie people. To me, like her inconsistency in her use of profane and explicit language and her overuse of culturally appropriated “urban” lingo, her reference to male actors makes her appear to be working too hard to be hip or younger or something, which is an utter failure. There was also a bit too many references to her “smelling her pits” and, in other ways, checking herself for underarm freshness; apparently Julia has a bit of a sweat and, therefore, resulting odor problem. It was disconcerting. I generally like aspects that make characters appear very realistic, but that was a bit too much. I think it might have been an attempt at humor. If so, it didn’t work for me. Finally, on her language, some listeners might be offended by the frequent use of these phrases as expressions of exasperation: “Christ,” “Jesus,” “God help me,” “Oh my God,” “I swear to Christ on a cracker.”

    There were several—about 4 I think—somewhat detailed but not explicit or erotic sex scenes. Alex requires control in the bedroom. And there was 1 butt smack episode. They never used or even referenced a condom. There first sex was phone sex; the second sex scene was at his office against a door.
    There were 3 things I liked in the book. I liked Julia admitting, earlier in their developing relationship, that she was not in love with him but “in like” and growing towards more. It was refreshing to have a character not jump to “love” so quickly while still recognizing that there are intense emotions present. Finally, I witnessed an author who recognizes that there are several other great, positive emotions that often precede romantic love and that it’s just fine to use those in a story. And it actually makes the story more plausible especially for mature characters. Also, I was in awe at her description of the Harry Potter birthday party she put together. And The final hour of the book was good, but, unfortunately, it was the only good part of the book. During that time, Julia acted maturely and dropped the horrible “cool” or “hip” façade. But I can’t say that it was worth listening to almost 8 hours to get there. I became bored and was just ready to get it over with. But it had a good ending.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.