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Tyler

Tylerjms7

HARTFORD, MI, United States | Member Since 2011

5
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 4 reviews
  • 59 ratings
  • 174 titles in library
  • 28 purchased in 2014
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  • The Talent Code: Unlocking the Secret of Skill in Sports, Art, Music, Math, and Just About Anything

    • UNABRIDGED (6 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Daniel Coyle
    • Narrated By John Farrell
    Overall
    (733)
    Performance
    (367)
    Story
    (367)

    New research has revealed that myelin, once considered an inert form of insulation for brain cells, may be the holy grail of acquiring skill. Journalist Daniel Coyle spent years investigating talent hotbeds, interviewing world-class practitioners (top soccer players, violinists, fighter, pilots, artists, and bank robbers) and neuroscientists. In clear, accessible language, he presents a solid strategy for skill acquisition.

    Stephen says: "Anecdotes presented as data"
    "Daddy...Where does talent come from?"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    In essence this is what Coyle seeks to answer. In our day talent is a sort of frustrating "catch all" phrase. Why are people good at certain activities? Talent. Why do some excel and others fail? Talent. What determines what I do with my life? Talent. Maybe you're like me and deep inside you never felt this answer was really right.

    Does it seem right that the genetic lottery determines my whole life? If I'm good at something I will be rich and famous and if I'm not (have no talent) then I will be a meaningless plebeian with no purpose or mark on the world? I never accepted this reasoning and so reading this book was like fresh air for my thinking.

    First off the author shows how many people who we would consider talent-less outperform others who have all of the talent. Second, he shows the process whereby this ability and skill is formed and how you can have it too.

    As a teacher of guitar, as well as other things light bulbs were going off in my head as I read of how people around the world are turning normal people into major talents.

    If you are a coach you will love this book, it has great example throughout much evidence and science to back up each careful conclusion and much to say about how to achieve skill at any kind of task.

    The only drawback is the reader. Not the best, but the material so interesting you won't even notice.

    Bottom Line: EVERYONE should listen to this book!

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Walking with God through Pain and Suffering

    • UNABRIDGED (13 hrs and 10 mins)
    • By Timothy Keller
    • Narrated By Lloyd James
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (54)
    Performance
    (47)
    Story
    (46)

    Walking with God through Pain and Suffering is the definitive Christian book on why bad things happen and how we should respond to them. The question of why there is pain and suffering in the world has confounded every generation; yet there has not been a major book from a Christian perspective exploring why they exist for many years.

    Paul says: "The best book on this topic. Wonderful."
    "Best book on suffering g I've ever read"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Keller deals with almost every angle when it comes to the truth of suffering. He discusses both the personal and philosophical ideas in an unashamed and in afraid way dealing with the big questions that all suffers face. He doesn't back down from the sticky stuff and answers each in a satisfactory way.

    Keller also does a great job at showing the historical views of suffering being nuanced enough to show all the views of suffering from scripture. This isn't a one size fits all type if advice. In fact Keller states clearly that there are many Tyler's of suffering and each must be dealt with differently.

    However, my favorite part was the stories of real people at the end of each chapter. Hearing how they dealt with suffering was incredibly inspirational.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Transformational Church: Creating a New Scorecard for Congregations

    • UNABRIDGED (7 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Thom Rainer, Ed Stetzer
    • Narrated By John Lescault
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (20)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (8)

    Churches committed to following Christ's example want this world changed for the sake of eternity. While the supernatural piece of making that happen goes without saying, how does a body of believers do its part to be in that "sweet spot" where true spiritual transformation occurs?

    Kevin says: "Valuable Information: Buy The Hardcopy"
    "A Book than can change how you do church"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book will change how you do church. But as stated in a previous review the points the authors make are based upon their survey data on the issues. They rarely if ever present points to prove their data. In paper form that would be fine. In audio form it is a little harder.

    I kept wanting them to throw in some proof points to show WHY the data says what is says. Since I already agreed with the points of this book it didn't give me a lot of new information. However, one section that is very helpful are the real life examples.

    For each point examples of a specific church are given to show what it looks like in action. But to me most people who read this book will already have their own thoughts on how churches will be successful. Will surveys alone convince them to change their minds on these issues? I think no.

    Maybe you are a person who is new to church or a student looking to start to build your knowledge of church ministry and philosophy to me this is where the book shines. This would be an excellent book for a class on church growth or church philosophy where the ideas could be dissected and discussed. Do these ideas work? Yes, according to the data. But another Audible book I read about change, tells me data alone does mean change will happen.

    I would also echo that the reader is very bad, almost hard to listen to. The content is life changing the performance is painstaking.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Dust and Shadow: An Account of the Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By Lyndsay Faye
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1362)
    Performance
    (1022)
    Story
    (1017)

    Breathless and painstakingly researched, this is a stunning debut mystery in which Sherlock Holmes unmasks Jack the Ripper. Lyndsay Faye perfectly captures all the color and syntax of Conan Doyle’s distinctive nineteenth-century London.

    connie says: "the best of both Holmes"
    "How would Sherlock face a Serial Killer?"
    Overall
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    Story

    If you enjoy the old Sherlock Holmes stories at all you will find this book engaging and fascinating. As I understand it the author intended a very logical purpose; to put Sherlock Holmes on the case of one of the most notorious serial killers in history. Even more interesting this one was during the "Holmes" period making it even more believable.

    Everything that you love about Sherlock you'll find in this book however, the author portrays some rather difficult material. First; how would this time period deal with a serial killer? Something the author portrays as foreign to the time.

    Second; how would Holmes and Watson deal with such an evil man. Most of their suspects while evil are not on the level of a serial killer making this a unique story in the Holmes universe. Whether you enjoy this story or not will probably come down to how you feel the author handled this second question.

    I finished the book feeling a bit frustrated, for one part Holmes seems to miss some obvious things, and for another part the emotions of the case for Holmes caught me off guard. He is not particularly known for being an emotional man, but maybe he would be if faced with such a killer? Either way I enjoyed the book even if I wasn't all too satisfied with the ending.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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