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Alex

Vegan, skeptic, promoter of animal rights.

Rochester, NY, United States | Member Since 2010

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  • Connectome: How the Brain's Wiring Makes Us Who We Are

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Sebastian Seung
    • Narrated By MacLeod Andrews
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (80)
    Performance
    (70)
    Story
    (66)

    Sebastian Seung, a dynamic professor at MIT, is on a quest to discover the biological basis of identity. He believes it lies in the pattern of connections between the brain’s neurons, which change slowly over time as we learn and grow. The connectome, as it’s called, is where our genetic inheritance intersects with our life experience. It’s where nature meets nurture. Seung introduces us to the dedicated researchers who are mapping the brain’s connections, neuron by neuron, synapse by synapse.

    aaron says: "A Nice Addition to Your Brain Science Library"
    "Speculative, disjointed. Not ready for prime time."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This book should have been an article. The field has not produced enough true science to justify a book-length treatment. The book MIGHT be of interest to people who know very little about neurobiology, since the basics of brain science are covered adequately. But if you have any sort of background in neuroscience, you may want to wait until connectomics has actually produced some substantial results before you a read a book about it.

    Some of the topics in the book (such as cryonics) are given too much coverage, and the overall flow of the book is not as smooth as one might hope.

    Also, the narrator uses some very questionable pronunciations of words like "genomics" and "axonal". He also mispronounces names, such as "Koch" and "Turgenev".

    Overall, I did not enjoy this book and would not recommend it.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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