You no longer follow Kathleen

You will no longer see updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can re-follow a user if you change your mind.

OK

You now follow Kathleen

You will receive updates from this user when they write new reviews, or suggestions based on their library or recommendations.

You can unfollow a user if you change your mind.

OK

Kathleen

Minneapolis, MN, USA | Member Since 2005

282
HELPFUL VOTES
  • 129 reviews
  • 149 ratings
  • 0 titles in library
  • 293 purchased in 2014
FOLLOWING
0
FOLLOWERS
34

  • Love Is the Cure: On Life, Loss, and the End of AIDS

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 6 mins)
    • By Elton John
    • Narrated By Elton John
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (75)
    Performance
    (69)
    Story
    (68)

    In the 1980s, Elton John saw friend after friend, loved one after loved one, perish needlessly from AIDS. In the midst of the plague, he befriended Ryan White, a young Indiana boy ostracized by his town and his school because of the HIV infection he had contracted from a blood transfusion. Ryan's inspiring life and devastating death led Elton to two realizations: His own life was a mess. And he had to do something to help stop the AIDS crisis. Since then, Elton has dedicated himself to overcoming the plague.

    jeff says: "Inspiring book"
    "Elton John's moving story of his life."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Elton John gives us a candid look at his life full of cocaine and booze from 1974 until 1990. In that time period, he meets Ryan White and befriends him and his mother through Ryan’s harassment in Kokomo, Indiana where he contracts AIDS through a blood transfusion, and is treated badly by the town due to fear about, and misunderstanding of, AIDS in the 1980’s. When Ryan died, Elton John decides to get help for himself, but still needs the intervention of his lover who has gone to get help himself. Elton goes through rehab, kicks his habits, and finds he is fortunate not to have contracted the HIV virus. From 1990 to the present, he has worked to combat the spread of AIDS. He believes that if everyone who was HIV positive was offered the drugs that exist today, they could live AIDS-free for 20-30 years, and also cites a study that through the use of such drugs, the HIV virus is much less likely to be transferred to a partner. So he argues that by making medication available to anyone in the world who is HIV positive, and combining it with better support for people world-wide who are already sick, we could stop AIDS in its tracks even without finding a cure for the disease. It is an interesting book and it is clear that Elton John passionately believes his theory of love being the ultimate cure. Here is a book that couldn’t be narrated better by anyone but Elton John himself.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Smoky Joe's Cafe

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 11 mins)
    • By Bryce Courtenay
    • Narrated By Humphrey Bower
    Overall
    (129)
    Performance
    (58)
    Story
    (56)

    Thommo returns from Vietnam to an Australia that regards him as a mercenary guilty of war crimes. He begins to develop all kinds of physical and mental problems, and thinks it must only be him until he finds he is not alone. Ten mates, all who remain of his platoon who fought and died in the Battle of Long Tan, are affected the same way.

    Kathleen says: "Australian Vietnam vet with Agent Orange"
    "Australian Vietnam vet with Agent Orange"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    book is set, I believe in the 1980’s. The vet is suffering from Agent Orange exposure, but it is before either the U.S. or Australia are admitting that Agent Orange is the cause of so much damage. So in this book, a group of Vietnam vets who served together decide to grow hashish and sell it in has honey to earn enough to help vets who have been harmed and who aren’t getting help from the government. It’s totally illegal, but they have this enterprise for a year, raise a lot of money and help a lot of people. It’s a very interesting book with the vet and his wife coming back together after having almost been separated by the events of the war because he can’t talk about them. Also, some interesting contrasts between experiences of Australian Vietnam vets and American Vietnam vets.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • The Casual Vacancy

    • UNABRIDGED (17 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By J. K. Rowling
    • Narrated By Tom Hollander
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (2969)
    Performance
    (2608)
    Story
    (2634)

    When Barry Fairweather dies unexpectedly in his early 40s, the little town of Pagford is left in shock. Pagford is, seemingly, an English idyll, with a cobbled market square and an ancient abbey, but what lies behind the pretty façade is a town at war. Rich at war with poor, teenagers at war with their parents, wives at war with their husbands, teachers at war with their pupils.... Pagford is not what it at first seems. And the empty seat left by Barry on the town's council soon becomes the catalyst for the biggest war the town has yet seen.

    cristina says: "I was surprised by how much I liked it"
    "The latest Rowling book, not like Harry Potter."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    We have all been waiting for the Rowling book that would come after the Harry Potter series. What has finally appeared, five years later, is well written with well developed characters, but the book itself was disappointing to me. The plot revolves around a man on the Perish Council, (for U.S. it would be town council, I think). The man who is the catalyst for the book takes his wife out for an anniversary dinner in the first chapter and drops dead on the restaurant parking lot from what they assume is an aneurism. But his death starts a whole series of events. There is a perish council election coming up, because of his death, to fill “the casual vacancy.” Whoever is elected will determine what happens next with the money in the perish. The man who died, named Barry, wants them to put more money into a drug rehabilitation program and provide more money for services for those who are poor. But most of the council does not want to even keep the program open. They want to cut back on providing any services to “these people who don’t work” and shut down the rehabilitation methadone program. So this is the backdrop for all the things that happen. We are introduced to amyriad of characters, most of them very unpleasant, with their children, equally unpleasant. The book reminds me of Elizabeth George’s “what happened before he shot her” but it is much more relentless with the most sympathetic character being the ungovernable teenage daughter of a drug addict. It’s also quite long. And if it hadn’t been Rowling, and if I hadn’t liked Harry Potter so much, I probably wouldn’t have finished it. The Harry Potter books were dark, but she managed to put some lightness in them here and there, and the reader liked several of the characters. That isn’t true here. So my final conclusion: the book is interesting but disappointing to me.

    13 of 25 people found this review helpful
  • The Taken

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 12 mins)
    • By Inger Ash Wolfe
    • Narrated By Bernadette Dunne
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (22)
    Performance
    (11)
    Story
    (11)

    Investigator Hazel Micallef is still recovering from back surgery when a report comes in that a body has been found in a nearby lake, snagged under several feet of water. But the whole thing is way too eerie. The first installment of a story has just been published in the local paper: a passage that describes in detail just such a discovery. Real life is far too close to fiction for coincidence.

    Bob says: "Excellent, fun read!"
    "Thriller, 2nd in the Hazel Makallef series."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is the second Hazel Micallef mystery taking place in rural Ontario. Hazel is still recovering from the injuries she got in “The Calling”, first book, and from back surgery. She and her 87-year-old mother can’t take care of themselves and live alone during this recovery, so they move in with Hazel’s ex-husband and his new wife. Some awkward moments caused mostly by Hazel, the second wife is very nice to her. Hazel is still working, however, and she is called in on a new case. While fishing, some tourists came upon what appeared to be a body. When the body was dragged up, it turned out to be a headless manikin. Eerily, there is a story being run in the local paper, and as the details unfold, the issue seems to be about a girl who was killed some time ago where the case had been closed. Then someone seems to be using a live computer camera coverage to show a man being held, tied in a chair with a hand missing, and Hazel is sent the hand in a box. More bizarre things happen and it’s clear that Hazel and her officers are being led along in a game being perpetrated by someone who feels the girl’s case was closed too early and the murderer not found. Excellent story. A thriller with Hazel performing some improbable stunts, but I find this series very entertaining. The narrator is perfect. Hazel is always coming up with weird questions that lead to clues, and the narrator poses those questions with just the kind of vagueness and stubbornness you would expect Hazel to exhibit in the circumstances. Very good.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Assignment to Hell: The War Against Nazi Germany with Correspondents Walter Cronkite, Andy Rooney, A.J. Liebling, Homer Bigart, and Hal Boyle

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Timothy M. Gay
    • Narrated By Walter Dixon
    Overall
    (15)
    Performance
    (14)
    Story
    (14)

    In February 1943, a group of journalists - including a young wire service correspondent named Walter Cronkite and cub reporter Andy Rooney - clamored to fly along on a bombing raid over Nazi Germany. Seven of the 64 bombers that attacked a U-boat base that day never made it back to England. A fellow survivor, Homer Bigart of the New York Herald Tribune, asked Cronkite if he’d thought through a lede. "I think I’m going to say," mused Cronkite, “that I’ve just returned from an assignment to hell."

    Kathleen says: "WW II correspondents adventures in the war."
    "WW II correspondents adventures in the war."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Their work on the front lines made headlines. In February 1943, a group of journalists - including a young wire-service correspondent named Walter Cronkite
    and cub reporter Andy Rooney - clamored to fly along on a bombing raid over Nazi Germany. Seven of the 64 bombers that attacked a U-boat base that day
    never made it back to England. A fellow survivor, Homer Bigart of the New York Herald Tribune, asked Cronkite if he'd thought through a lede. "I think
    I'm going to say," mused Cronkite, "that I've just returned from an assignment to hell." During his esteemed career, Walter Cronkite issued millions of
    words for public consumption, but he never wrote or uttered a truer phrase. Assignment to Hell tells the powerful and poignant story of the war against
    Hitler through the eyes of five intrepid reporters. Crisscrossing battlefields, they formed a journalistic band of brothers, repeatedly placing themselves
    in harm's way to bring the war home for anxious American readers. Cronkite crashed into Holland on a glider with U.S. paratroopers. Rooney dodged mortar
    shells as he raced across the Rhine at Remagen. Behind enemy lines in Sicily, Bigart jumped into an amphibious commando raid that nearly ended in disaster.
    The New Yorker's A. J. Liebling ducked sniper fire as Allied troops liberated his beloved Paris. The Associated Press's Hal Boyle barely escaped SS storm
    troopers as he uncovered the massacre of U.S. soldiers during the Battle of the Bulge. Assignment to Hell is a stirring tribute to five of World War II's
    greatest correspondents and to the brave men and women who fought on the front lines against fascism - their generation's "assignment to hell".

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Change of Heart

    • UNABRIDGED (15 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Jodi Picoult
    • Narrated By Nicole Poole, Stafford Clark-Price, Jim Frangione, and others
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1158)
    Performance
    (382)
    Story
    (379)

    Known for tackling hot-button issues in her timely fiction, Jodi Picoult has sold millions of books. Change of Heart explores capital punishment and organized religion through the tale of death row inmate Shay Bourne. Bourne's last request is to donate his heart to his victim's ailing sister. The situation gets more complicated when Bourne begins performing miracles in full view of witnesses - including his Catholic spiritual advisor.

    Sue says: "Amazing"
    "Not as good as some of her books."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Picoult’s hot button issue for this book involves a death row inmate who wants to donate his heart to the sister of the little girl he killed, along with her step-father. The problem is that the sentence was to be carried out by lethal injection, and if that form of death was used, he could not donate his heart as it would not be functional. His civil liberties lawyer is arguing that the state hang him instead of killing him through injection. That’s the main issue in this book. The problem with the book is that it contains several other issues, some involving such things as that perhaps he can perform miracles. The main issue is well laid out, and Picoult has clearly done her usual thorough research involving the medical and legal problems surrounding death sentences and donation of body organs. But this book could have done with fewer additional issues.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Bring Up the Bodies: A Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By Hilary Mantel
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1239)
    Performance
    (1062)
    Story
    (1073)

    Though he battled for seven years to marry her, Henry is disenchanted with Anne Boleyn. She has failed to give him a son and her sharp intelligence and audacious will alienate his old friends and the noble families of England. When the discarded Katherine dies in exile from the court, Anne stands starkly exposed, the focus of gossip and malice. At a word from Henry, Thomas Cromwell is ready to bring her down.

    Darwin8u says: "Mantel Pulls the History out of the History"
    "Sequel to Wolf Hall. Very good."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is the sequel to Hilary Mantel’s award-winning “Wolf Hall”. Here we follow Thomas Cromwell, secretary and advisor to King Henry VIII to the beheading of Anne Boleyn. While King henry was enamoured of Anne Boleyn for seven years, which included his divorce and annulment of his 20-year marriage to Katherine of Aragon, his exiting from the Catholic church and starting his own church in England, and his ultimate marriage to Anne, he soon becomes disenchanted with her. Their marriage lasts three years; no son is born alive, and only a daughter, Elizabeth, lives. Katherine finally dies, and within a few weeks of her death, the gossip surrounding Anne grows to a climax as people perceive the king is willing to hear rumors and innuendos about her unfaithfulness to him. Again, Thomas Cromwell is the primary focus of the novel and we see events unfold through his eyes. We see a man who rose to his high office but remains, so far as nobility is concerned, a commoner. He has dedicated his life and service to King Henry VIII but with no illusions that the king and the nobility could turn on him in a moment. He retains his position through his wit, intelligence and long memory regarding the people around him. The weeks involving Anne Boleyn’s trial, and the trial of other men tried for treason for allegedly taking liberties with her, is terrifying. The actual beheading of Anne Boleyn is gut wrenching, particularly when you learn that she must kneel but will have no block to rest her head on. She must kneel perfectly still in one place so the head will come off with one stroke. Reading about this period reminds me very much of the French Revolution period of chaos. I don’t know if Mantel plans more books leading to the eventual downfall of Cromwell or if this is it. Simon Vance does his usual wonderful job of narration with each character having its own vocal expressions, Cromwell always remaining slightly remote and cool. I assume this book will get some awards as well. It is very good.

    8 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • Lesbian Pulp Fiction: The Sexually Intrepid World of Lesbian Paperback Novels, 1950-1965

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 43 mins)
    • By Katherine V. Forrest (editor)
    • Narrated By Madison Vaughn
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (21)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (19)

    In 1950, publisher Fawcett Books founded its Gold Medal imprint, inaugurating the reign of lesbian pulp fiction. These were the books that small-town lesbians and prurient men bought by the millions - cheap, easy to find in drugstores, and immediately recognizable by their lurid covers: often a hard-looking brunette standing over a scantily clad blonde, or a man gazing in tormented lust at a lovely, unobtainable lesbian. For women leading straight lives, here was confirmation that they were not alone.

    Kathleen says: "Lesbian short stories from the 1950's."
    "Lesbian short stories from the 1950's."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    The Publisher’s note explains this title as well as I can.
    Long before the rise of the modern gay movement, an unnoticed literary revolution was occurring between the covers of the cheaply produced lesbian pulp
    paperbacks of the post-World War II era. In 1950, publisher Fawcett Books founded its Gold Medal imprint, inaugurating the reign of lesbian pulp fiction.
    These were the books that small-town lesbians and prurient men bought by the millions - cheap, easy to find in drugstores, and immediately recognizable
    by their lurid covers: often a hard-looking brunette standing over a scantily clad blonde, or a man gazing in tormented lust at a lovely, unobtainable
    lesbian. For women leading straight lives, here was confirmation that they were not alone and that darkly glamorous, "gay" places like Greenwich Village
    existed. Some - especially those written by lesbians - offered sympathetic and realistic depictions of "life in the shadows", while others (no less fun
    to read now) were smutty, sensational tales of innocent girls led astray. In the overheated prose typical of the genre, this collection documents the emergence
    of a lesbian subculture in postwar America.

    These stories had one drawback. They were excerpts from full novels, so they never felt as if you got the whole story. But each one clearly described an earth-shaking event in the life of a particular woman. Ann Bannon’s introduction is very thorough and gives us a history of that period.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • 1Q84

    • UNABRIDGED (46 hrs and 50 mins)
    • By Haruki Murakami, Jay Rubin (translator), Philip Gabriel (translator)
    • Narrated By Allison Hiroto, Marc Vietor, Mark Boyett
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (4231)
    Performance
    (3695)
    Story
    (3664)

    The year is 1984 and the city is Tokyo.

    A young woman named Aomame follows a taxi driver's enigmatic suggestion and begins to notice puzzling discrepancies in the world around her. She has entered, she realizes, a parallel existence, which she calls 1Q84 - "Q" is for "question mark". A world that bears a question....

    Dr. says: "Slow, Strange, and (ultimately) Satisfying"
    "Intriguing novel sort of a 1984 plot."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is a very long book that took me months to read, but was worth it.
    The year is 1984 and the city is Tokyo.A young woman named Aomame follows a taxi driver's enigmatic suggestion and begins to notice puzzling discrepancies
    in the world around her. She has entered, she realizes, a parallel existence, which she calls 1Q84 - "Q" is for "question mark". A world that bears a question.
    Meanwhile, an aspiring writer named Tengo takes on a suspect ghostwriting project. He becomes so wrapped up with the work and its unusual author that,
    soon, his previously placid life begins to come unraveled. As Aomame's and Tengo's narratives converge over the course of this single year, we learn of
    the profound and tangled connections that bind them ever closer: a beautiful, dyslexic teenage girl with a unique vision; a mysterious religious cult that
    instigated a shoot-out with the metropolitan police; a reclusive, wealthy dowager who runs a shelter for abused women; a hideously ugly private investigator;
    a mild-mannered yet ruthlessly efficient bodyguard; and a peculiarly insistent television-fee collector. A love story, a mystery, a fantasy, a novel of
    self-discovery, a dystopia to rival George Orwell's, 1Q84 is Haruki Murakami's most ambitious undertaking yet: an instant best seller in his native Japan,
    and a tremendous feat of imagination from one of our most revered contemporary writers. BONUS AUDIO: Audible interviews the translators of 1Q84, Jay Rubin
    and Philip Gabriel.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Dead at Daybreak

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Deon Meyer
    • Narrated By Simon Vance
    Overall
    (19)
    Performance
    (18)
    Story
    (18)

    An antiques dealer robbed and killed, and the only clues are a scrap of blank paper and the unusual weapon used. Now ex-cop Zatopek "Zed" van Heerden has 14 days in which to fill in the blanks in this dead man's past - a past which only seems to begin in 1983.

    Kathleen says: "Another Capetown police procedural, wonderful."
    "Another Capetown police procedural, wonderful."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Zed Van Heerden, a former cop and now a private eye in Capetown, is referred to a young lawyer representing the mistress of an antique furniture dealer who was murdered with an M-16 rifle and tortured first with a blow torch. There is a safe, large with shelves built into the wall, which is left open and is empty except for a piece of paper used for rolling American bills. While the woman was never married to the dealer, they’ve lived together for several years and he left a will leaving everything to her. But the will is gone, and that’s what they want Van Heerden to find. But as he becomes involved in the case, he realizes he will have to solve the murder, and solving the murder brings him into contact with all kinds of South African and American military intelligence and puts his life and that of his mother and everyone else in danger. As is usually truewith these books, there’s also a back story involving why Van Heerden left the police force. It’s very good, and as usual Simon Vance does a wonderful job with the accents and the narration in general.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Desert Run: A Lena Jones Mystery, Book 4

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 37 mins)
    • By Betty Webb
    • Narrated By Marguerite Gavin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (7)
    Performance
    (7)
    Story
    (7)

    Things are never easy for Scottsdale private eye Lena Jones. Her partner in Desert Investigations, Jimmy Sisiwan, is leaving for a moneyed wife and a job at Southwest Microsystems, and her old captain at the Scottsdale Police Department is off to his home in Brooklyn. Meanwhile, she’s doing security for Warren Quinn, director of a documentary film about the American World War II camp for German POWs at Arizona’s Papago Park, from which some prisoners once escaped.

    Kathleen says: "4th in the Lena Jones series, very good."
    "4th in the Lena Jones series, very good."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    This is the fourth in the Lena Jones series of a Scottsdale Arizona private eye. Here she is hired to provide security while a documentary is being filmed involving the escape of German POW’s from a prison camp in Arizona. The same night of the escape, a family was slaughtered in their home. The only survivor, a son, was blamed, and tried for the crime but was not convicted. However, his life was ruined because everyone, except the jury, believed he was guilty. Now, 60 years after the original event, one of the Nazis who was in that camp, who escaped that night, and who was allowed to emigrate to America because of his scientific prowess, is murdered. No one likes him. He still loudly proclaims his Nazi principles and loudly proclaims the Nazi views of minorities. There has always been a theory that he and the Germans who escaped during the war were responsible for the death of the family. And now, in addition to her job providing security, Lena is dragged into determining who killed the Nazi because his caretaker, an Ethiopian immigrant is being blamed. Then, two more persons are murdered, Lena thinks, because they know too much about the case, and Lena’s own life is in danger. Her oldest friend, a police detective, is retiring and moving away, and her best friend and business partner is getting married and moving to another company where he’ll make more money. Lena indeed has lots to deal with in this book. The book continues to provide us with Arizona scenery and interesting characters.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.