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G. Wolfe

Growing up in the Pacific Northwest I am enamored with trees, rain, and floor to ceiling greenery. I've always been an avid reader, but have found I really enjoy the multitasking potential of audio books. I can enjoy walking around in the woods with my puppy while absorbing a book at the same time! The books I enjoy most tend to be narrative non-fiction, science fiction, and historical fiction/non-fiction.

Seattle, WA USA

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HELPFUL VOTES
  • 2 reviews
  • 4 ratings
  • 1 titles in library
  • 1 purchased in 2014
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  • The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 57 mins)
    • By Charles Duhigg
    • Narrated By Mike Chamberlain
    Overall
    (4535)
    Performance
    (3830)
    Story
    (3800)

    At its core, The Power of Habit contains an exhilarating argument: The key to exercising regularly, losing weight, raising exceptional children, becoming more productive, building revolutionary companies and social movements, and achieving success is understanding how habits work. Habits aren’t destiny. As Charles Duhigg shows, by harnessing this new science, we can transform our businesses, our communities, and our lives.

    Mehra says: "Nice! A guide on how to change"
    "Despite all my rage I am still...."
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    There are a lot of books in the narrative non-fiction genre, "The Power of Habit" is one of the best! Duhigg does an amazing job keeping his audience fascinated with various stories and anecdotes. He even manages to provide a few cliff hangers (something that is relatively rare in narrative non-fiction) by splitting some of his stories into segments that leave you eagerly turning the pages in anticipation.

    The layout of the book is very easy to follow, as well. The book is is delivered in three parts, splitting Duhigg's concepts into individuals, organizations, and societies. You are taken on a habit journey in which the main premise transforms and expands in a truly "one size fits all" fashion. My absolute favorite part of the book was reading specific examples of companies that developed marketing schemes based around existing habits or generating new habits in society to market a product. I now understand how tooth brushing became a national habit!


    What did you like best about this story?

    The anecdotes were engaging and entertaining, which made grasping the premise of the book very easy.


    Have you listened to any of Mike Chamberlain’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    This was a great performance! This guy really knows how to speak clearly but with excitement in his inflection.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    For sure! I definitely never got bored of it. And when I did put it down, I found myself thinking about everything I'd heard until the next time I popped in my headphones.


    Any additional comments?

    Definitely a great read in audio format!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Eric Klinenberg
    • Narrated By Patrick Lawlor
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (71)
    Performance
    (61)
    Story
    (59)

    A revelatory examination of the most significant demographic shift since the baby boom—the sharp increase in the number of people who live alone—that offers surprising insights on the benefits of this epochal change. With eye-opening statistics, original data, and vivid portraits of people who go solo, Klinenberg upends the conventional wisdom to deliver the definitive take on how the rise of living alone is transforming the American experience.

    Joanie C says: "Interesting content"
    "Wall of Statistics Hits You for 30,000,000 Damage"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    What would have made Going Solo better?

    "Going Solo" is similar to the narrative non-fiction of books like "Freakonomics" or Malcolm Gladwell's "The Tipping Point". "Going Solo" could have been an amazingly fascinating read, but it runs into a little trouble in the statistics department. Specifically, there are too many, too much, way way overkill. "Going Solo" doesn't just give you facts and data, it pretty much molds them into a mallet and smacks you upside the face with them....repeatedly...until you can not even remember once having had cheekbones.

    If you are the sort of person who enjoys reading spreadsheets, company profiles, quarterly earnings statements, and maybe a few medical dictionaries, then this book is for you! If you like a little story with your data, then skip this one, it's a hardcore snoozer.

    If you can overlook 90% of the book and still retain the basic underlying message, then it's a pretty interesting read! Even so....STILL A SNOOZER.


    Would you ever listen to anything by Eric Klinenberg again?

    The narrator did an awesome job adding tone and inflection to a very data oriented read. I'd definitely listen to this fella again.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    The scene where I was listening to "Going Solo" on my headphones, fell asleep for an hour, woke up and realized the narrator was still on the same set of statistics!!! Talk about soap opera for analysts!


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    The statistics the book has collected paint a very enlightening picture of the ways in which world views are changing to destigmatize a life without marriage. It's a story that could be told in one chapter with the remaining 272 pages being an appendix of supporting statistics...but it's still an interesting message.


    Any additional comments?

    Think about getting this book in some sort of written format, it's probably easier to skim over the endless pages of statistics to get to the good parts.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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