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Nathie

Washington, DC, United States | Member Since 2010

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  • The Vault: An Inspector Wexford Novel

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 42 mins)
    • By Ruth Rendell
    • Narrated By Steven Crossley
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (104)
    Performance
    (85)
    Story
    (83)

    The impossible has happened. Chief Inspector Reg Wexford has retired. He and his wife now divide their time between Kingsmarkham and a coachhouse in Hampstead belonging to their actress daughter, Sheila. For all the benefits of a more relaxed way of life, Wexford misses being the law. But a chance meeting in a London street, with someone he had known briefly as a very young police constable, changes everything. Tom Ede is now a detective superintendent, and is very keen to recruit Wexford as an adviser on a difficult case.

    Norma says: "This said it is unabriged, but is it"
    "Reg still on the case"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    I like the way it brings an old Rendell story (A Sight for Sore Eyes) and the Wexford series together.


    Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

    Yes, for the same reason given above and also revealing how Wexford is adjusting, or trying to adjust to retirement. Rendell is very good at weaving various strings of a plot together, revealing just enough here and there.


    What does Steven Crossley bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    I am a long time listener to the Wexford series and always enjoyed the way Crossley portrays his characters by just a subtle change of voice, more like an attitude than an alteration of register.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    The obvious point was where Wexford and Sheila have their emotional exchange after she and her sons have taken over his house. But I find the times Rendell writes with Wexford and his grandchildren always very moving.


    Any additional comments?

    It does make me a bit nervous to now that Chief Inspector Wexford is retired, I can't imagine a time where I won't be able to look over his shoulder as he investigates. It's rather selfish of me, I know, to keep him from his well-deserved rest.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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