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Rich Seeley

From 1980 to 1994, I was a local columnist for The Outlook, the daily newspaper in Santa Monica.

Tulsa, OK, United States | Member Since 2009

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  • Ending the Pursuit of Happiness: A Zen Guide

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 28 mins)
    • By Barry Magid
    • Narrated By Joe O'Neill
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (19)
    Performance
    (15)
    Story
    (14)

    This new book from Zen teacher, psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, and critical favorite, Barry Magid, inspires us to outgrow the impossible pursuit of happiness, and instead make peace with the perfection of the way things are. Including ourselves! Using wryly gentle prose, Magid invites readers to consider the notion that our certainty that we are broken may be turning our pursuit of happiness into a source of more suffering.

    Richard Seeley says: "Disappointing"
    "Disappointing"
    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    I was disappointed in this book. To begin with the title is misleading. A Zen critique of the popular culture's obsession with finding a happy solution to every human problem might have been interesting. But this is a very egocentric book about the author's experience working as a psychoanalyst and a Zen teacher. The stories he tells about his own special experiences fail to demonstrate that he has gained self awareness from his practice of either discipline. He is quick to point out the foibles and failures of past and present Zen teachers and practitioners but it sounds like church gossip. Far from bringing any new perspective to Zen or psychoanalysis the author supports the hierarchical structure that is common to most religions and academies. If I thought the author's views were all there was to Zen, I would want no more to do with it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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